(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Catalogue"

Kansas State Agricultural College 



CATALOGUE 



FIFTY-FIRST SESSION 
1913-1914 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1914-1915 



MANHATTAN 
The Kansas Industrialist, Vol. XL, No. 41. 

Entered at the post office, Manhattan, Kansas, as second-class matter. 

Act of July 36, 1894. 

5-1964 



KANSAS STATE PRINTING OFFICE. 

"W. C. Austin, State Printer. 

TOPEKA. 1914. 



The Board of Administration 



The Hon. ED. T. HACKNEY, President Term expires 1917 

Wellington, Sumner county. 

The Hon. E. W. HOCH Term expires 1915 

Marion, Marion county. 

The Hon. (Mrs.) CORA G. LEWIS Term expires 1917 

Kinsley, Edwards county. 

D. M. Bowen, Secretary. 

Pittsburg, Crawford county. 



Administrative Officers 



President Henry Jackson Waters 

Dean of the Division of Agriculture and 
Director of the Agricultural Experiment 
Station William M Jardine 

Acting Dean of the Division of Mechanic 
Arts and Director of the Engineering 
Experiment Station Andrey A. Potter 

Dean of the Division of General Science. . J. T. Willard 

Dean of the Division of Home Economics. . Mrs. Mary P. Van Zile 

Dean of the College Clark M. Brink 

Dean of the Division of College Extension, J. H. Miller 

Director of the Summer School E. L. Holton 

Principal of the School of Agriculture. . . H. L. Kent 

Registrar Miss Jessie McD. Machir 

Financial Secretary and Purchasing Agent, J. T. Lardner 

Librarian Arthur B. Smith 

Custodian G. F. Wagner 

(3) 



Standing Committees of the Faculty 

Admission: Jessie McD. Machir, J. V. Cortelyou, B. L. Remick, G. S. 
Lowman, W. A. Lippincott, Bessie W. Birdsall, Carl Ostrom, E. V. 
F^yd. 

Advanced Credit: College.— J. T. Willard, R. R. Price, J. W. Searson, 
Ula M. Dow, A. A. Potter, W. H. Andrews, L. E. Call. 

School of Agriculture. — H. L. Kent, E. L. Holton, Ada Rice, E. V. 
James, W. T. Stratton. 

Catalogue: J. V. Cortelyou, H. F. Roberts, J. W. Searson. 

College Rules: R. R. Price, J. E. Kammeyer, J. T. Willard, J. D. 
Walters. 

"College Studies": J. 0. Hamilton, A. A. Potter, L. E. Call, H. F. 
Roberts, A. B. Smith. 

Discipline: R. R. Price, Albert Dickens, J. W. Searson. 

Graduate Study: W. M Jardine, J. V. Cortelyou, A. A. Potter, H. F. 
Roberts, Mary P. Van Zile. 

Public Exercises: J. E. Kammeyer, J. V. Cortelyou, Olof Valley. 

Schedule of Classes: J. T. Willard, A. E. White. 

Student Affairs : J. O. Hamilton, J. W. Searson, E. L. Holton, Mary 
P. Van Zile, L. E. Conrad. 

Student Assembly: J. E. Kammeyer. 

Student Health: L. E. Conrad, L. D. Bushnell, L. W. Goss. 

(4) 



19 i 4. 


8915. 


JULY. 


JANUARY. 


JULY. 


S 


M 


T 


W 
1 


T 
2 


F 

3 


S 
4 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 
1 


S 
2 


S 


M 


T 


w 


T 

3 


F 
2 


S 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


1(5 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


2(5 


27 


28 


29 

• ■ 


30 


31 
* * 




24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


25 


26 


r. 


28 


29 


30 


31 


AUGUST. 


FEBRUARY. 


AUGUST. 














3 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


15 


)6 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 27 


28 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


28 














29 


30 


31 










30 


31 








































SEPTEMBER. 


MARCH. 


SEPTEMBER. 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 








1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


14 


15 


16 


17 


IB 


19 


20 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


19 


10 


21 


*i2 


*S 


24 


25 


27 


28 


29 


30 








28 


29 


30 


31 








26 


27 


28 


29 


30 






OCTOBER. 


APRIL. 


OCTOBER. 










\ 


2 


3 










1 


2 


3 












1 


2 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


11 


JS 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


10 


11 


12 


■3 


14 


15 


16 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


18 


19 


20 


:U 


22 


23 


24 


11 


18 


19 


20 


21 


9 2 


23 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


:iQ 


31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


NOVEMBER. 


MAY. 


NOVEMBER. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 














.1 




1 


"tt 


■3 


4 


5 


6 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


2 


3 


4 


5 


e 


7 


8 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


21 


22 


23 


21 


25 


26 


27 


29 


30 












23 
30 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


28 


29 


30 










■ DECEMBER. 


JUNE. 


DECEMBER. 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 








1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


U 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






27 


28 


29 


30 








26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 





(5) 



The College Calendar 



1914 
Sept. 14, Monday. — Faculty meeting at nine A. M. 
Sept. 14, Monday. — Meeting of assigners at ten a. m. 
Sept. 14, Monday. — Assignment of students begins at one-thirty p. m. 
Sept. 14, Monday. — Admission of new students at one-thirty p. m. 
Sept. 17, Thursday. — Assignment of students closes at five p. m. 
Sept. 17, Thursday. — Short course for housekeepers begins 
Sept. 18, Friday. — All classes meet according to schedule 
Sept. 18, Friday. — Opening convocation at ten A. m. 
Oct. 10, Saturday. — Scholarship deficiency reports due 
Oct. 31, Saturday. — Scholarship deficiency reports due 
Nov. 26 to 28, Thursday to Saturday. — Thanksgiving vacation 
Dec. 5, Saturday. — Examinations to remove conditions 
Dec. 11 to 18, Friday to Friday. — Examinations at close of term 
Dec. 18, Friday. — Fall term closes at eleven A. M. 

Dec. 14, Monday. — Assignment of students for winter term begins at 
nine a. m. 



1915 
Jan. 4, Monday. — Admission of new students at nine A. m. 
Jan. 5, Tuesday. — Assignment of students closes at five P. M. 
Jan. 5, Tuesday. — Short courses in agriculture and dairying begin 
Jan. 6, Wednesday. — All classes meet according to schedule 
Jan. 30, Saturday. — Scholarship deficiency reports due 
Feb. 20, Saturday. — Scholarship deficiency reports due 
Mar. 13, Saturday, — Examinations to remove conditions 
Mar. 17, Wednesday. — Short courses in agriculture and dairying close 
Mar. 19 to 26, Friday to Friday. — Examinations at close of term 
Mar. 26, Friday. — Winter term closes at eleven A. M. 
Mar. 22, Monday. — Assignment of students for the spring term begins 
at nine A.M. 



Mar. 29, Monday. — Admission of new students at nine A. M. 

Mar. 30, Tuesday. — Assignment of students closes at five P. M. 

Mar, 31, Wednesday. — All classes meet according to schedule 

Apr. 17, Saturday. — Scholarship deficiency reports due 

May 8, Saturday. — Scholarship deficiency reports due 

June 5, Saturday. — Examinations to remove conditions 

June 9 to 16, Wednesday to Wednesday. — Examinations at close of term 

June 13 to 17, Sunday to Thursday.- — Exercises of Commencement Week 

June 17 to July 29, Thursday to Thursday. — Summer School in session 



Sept. 13, Monday. — Assignment of students begins at one-thirty p. 
Sept. 16, Thursday. — Assignment of students closes 
Sept. 17, Friday. — All classes meet according to schedule 



Students must be present the very first day of each term or render a 
reasonable excuse. Failure to take out an assignment is not accepted 
as an excuse for absence from classes. 

(6) 



The Board of Instruction 



HENRY JACKSON WATERS, B. S. A., LL. D., 

President of the College. 

B. S. A., University of Missouri, 1886; Assistant Secretary, Missouri State Board of 
Agriculture, 1886-1888; Assistant in Agriculture to Missouri Experiment Station, 1888- 
1891; Professor of Agriculture, Pennsylvania State College, and Agriculturist, Pennsyl- 
vania Experiment Station, 1892-1895 ; Instructor in Animal Nutrition, Graduate School of 
Agriculture, University of Ohio, 1902; Director Missouri State Agricultural Exhibit, 
World's Fair, St. Louis, 1903-1904; Student at the Universities of Leipzig and Zurich, 
1904-1905; Instructor in Animal Nutrition, Graduate School of Agriculture, University of 
Illinois, 1906; President Missouri State Board of Agriculture, 1908-1909; Dean of the 
College of Agriculture, Director of the Experiment Station, and Professor of Agriculture, 
University of Missouri, 1895-1909; President, Kansas State Teachers' Association, 1911- 
1912; LL. D., New Hampshire State College, 1913; President, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, 1909 — . 

Office* A 30; Res. 2 Park Road. 

JOHN DANIEL WALTERS, D. A., 

Professor of Architecture and Drawing, 

Student, High School, Bucheggberg, Switzerland, 1860-1863; Student, College of Solo- 
thurn, Switzerland, 1863-1867; Instructor, Agricultural Experiment Station, Klingenberg,. 
Switzerland, 1865-1866; Student, University of Bern, 1868; Instructor in Industrial Art, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1876-1885; M.S., ibid.., 1883; Professor of Industrial 
Art and Design, ibid., 1885-1904; D. A., ibid., 1908; Professor of Architecture and Draw- 
ing, ibid., 1904 — . 

Office E 56; Res. 508 Bluemont Ave. 

JULIUS TERRASS WILLARD, D, Sa, 

Dean of the Division of General Science, Chemist of the Experiment 
Stations, Professor of Chemistry, 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1883 ; Assistant in Chemistry, ibid., 1883- 
1887; M.S., ibid., 1886; Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins University, 1887-1888; As- 
sistant Chemist, Kansas Experiment Station, 1888-1897; Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1890-1896; Associate Professor of Chemistry, ibid., 
1896-1897; Chemist, Kansas Experiment Station, 1897 — ; Professor of Applied Chemistry, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1897-1901; Director, Kansas Experiment Station, 1900- 
1906; Vice Director, ibid., 1907 — ; Professor of Chemistry, Kansas State Agricultural 
'College, 1901 — ; D. Sc, ibid., 1908; Dean of the Division of General Science, ibid., 1909 — ; 
Chemist, Engineering Experiment Station, ibid., 1910 — . 

Office C 30; Res. 1725 Poyntz Ave. 

BENJAMIN LUCE REMICK, Ph. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph. B., Cornell College (Iowa), 1889; Instructor, Cornell College Academy, 1889-1892- 
Ph. M., Cornell College, 1892 ; Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins University, 1892-1893 ; 
Instructor, Northwestern University Academy, 1893-1894; Graduate Student, University of 
Chicago, 1894-1895; Professor of Mathematics, University of the Pacific, 1895-1896; 
Graduate Student, University of Chicago, 1896-1898 ; Associate, Bradley Institute (Peoria, 
Illinois), 1898-1900; Professor of Mathematics, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1900 — . 

Office A 71; Res. 613 Houston St. 

* Buildings are designated by letters, as follows: 

A — Anderson Hall (Main). L — Domestic Science and Art Hall. 

Ag — Agricultural Hall. M — Auditorium. 

C — Denison Hall. N — Nichols Gymnasium. 

D — Dairy Hall. R — Farm Mechanics Hall (Old Armory). 

E — Mechanical Engineering Hall. S — Engineering Shops. 

F — Fairchild Hall (Library). V — Veterinary Hall. 

G — Agricultural Hall (Old). "W — Chemistry Annex, 

H — Horticultural Hall. X — Horticultural Laboratory. 
K — Kedzie Hall (Printing). 

(7) 



8 Kansas State Agricultural College 

HERBERT FULLER ROBERTS, M. S., 
Professor of Botany. 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1891; LL. B., Northwestern University Law School 
(Chicago), 1893; Admission to the Bar, Supreme Court of Illinois, 1893; Assistant in Law 
Offices, Kansas Citv, Missouri, 1893-1894; Graduate Student in Biology, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, 1896-1898 ; M. S., ibid., 1898 ; Graduate Student, University of Chi- 
cago, 1898-1899; Instructor in Botany, Washington University (St. Louis), 1899-1901; 
Professor of Botany, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1901 — . 

Office H 58; Res. 1920 Poyntz Ave. 

WILLIAM ARCH McKEEVER,* Ph. M., 
Professor of Philosophy. 

A. B., Camphell College, 1893; Principal, Holton Schools, 1894-1896; A.M., University 
of Kansas, 1898; Superintendent, Smith Center Public Schools, 1898-1900; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English and Philosophy, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1900-1901; Ph. M., 
Unversity of Chicago, 1904 ; Graduate Student, Harvard University Summer School, 1904 ; 
Professor of Philosophy, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1901 - October 1, 1913. 

ALBERT DICKENS, M. S., 
Professor of Horticulture. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1893 ; Foreman, Munger Orchards, Eureka, 
1895; State Teacher's Certificate, 1895; Instructor, Ellinwood High School, 1897-1898; 
Teacher's Life Certificate, 1898; Assistant in -Horticxilture, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, 1899-1901; M.S., ibid., 1901; Acting Professor of Horticxilture, ibid., 1901-1902; 
Professor of Horticulture, ibid., 1902 — . 

Office H 30; Res. 509 N. Manhattan Ave. 

CLARK MILLS BRINK, Ph. D., 

Dean of the College, Assistant to the President, Professor of English 
Literature. 

A. B., University of Rochester, 1879; Graduate, Rochester Theological Seminary, 1882; 
Pastor, First Baptist Church, Des Moines, Iowa, 1882-1887; Fellow and Graduate Student, 
New Y-ork University, 1888-1892; Instructor in Rhetoric and Oratory, Brown University, 
1892-1895; A.M., University of Rochester, 1893; Ph.D., New York University, 1894; 
Professor of English and History, Kalamazoo College, 1895-1901; Graduate Student, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, Summer, 1900; Graduate Student, Harvard University, 1901-1902; 
Professor of English, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1902-1911; Assistant to the 
President, ibid., 1908 — ; Dean of Science, ibid., 1908-1909; Dean of the College, ibid., 
1909 — ; Professor of English Literature, ibid., 1911 — . 

Office A 61; Res. 9 Park Road. 

RALPH RAY PRICE, A. M., 

Professor of History and Civics. 

A*. B., Baker University, 1896; Graduate Student, University of Kansas, 1896-1898; 
A. M., ibid., 1898; Assistant in History, ibid., 1897-1900; Graduate Student, University of 
Chicago, Summer, 1899; Instructor in History and Civics, Lawrence High School, 1898- 
1901; Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin, Summer, 1901; Instructor in History 
and Civics, Ishpeming (Michigan) High School, 1901-1902; Graduate Student, Cornell 
University, Summer, 1902; Instructor in History and Civics, and Assistant Principal, 
Rockford (Illinois) High School, 1902-1903 ; Graduate Student, University of Michigan 
Law School, Summer, 1909 ; Professor of American History and Government, University 
of Kansas, Summer, 1911; Professor of History and Civics, Kansas State Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1903 — . 

Office F 57; Res. 826 Houston St. 

JULIUS ERNEST KAMMEYER, A. M., LL. D., 

Professor of Economics. 

A. B., Central Wesleyan College, 1886; Instructor, Public Schools, 1886-1893; A.M., 
Central Wesleyan College, 1889; Instructor in History and Civics, Kansas City (Kansas) 
High School, 1893-1897; Yice Principal and Instructor in Economics, ibid., 1897-1903; 
Professor of Oratory, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1903-1904; Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, Summer, 1910; LL. D., Kansas City University, 1912; Professor of 
Economics, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1904 — . 

Office A 52; Res. 901 Bluemont Ave. 

1. Resigned. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 9 

JOHN VANZANDT CORTELYOU, Ph. D., 

Professor of German. 

A. B., University of Nebraska, 1897; Assistant Principal, Humboldt (Nebraska) High 
Sehool, 1897-1898; Principal, ibid., 1898-1899; A.M., University of Nebraska, 1901; 
Graduate Student, University of Heidelberg, Germany, 1901-1904; Research. Work, British 
Museum and Bibliotheque Nationale (Paris), Summer, 1903; Ph.D., University of Heidel- 
berg, 1904; Professor of German, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1904 — . 

Office N 59; Res. 5 Park Road. 

OLOF VALLEY, B. M., 

Professor of Music. 

Student, Teknologiska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, 1886-1888; Engineering Pro- 
fession, Chicago, 1888-1892; Pupil of Signor Carpi, 1892-1893, Albert B. Ruff, 1893-1897; 
Soloist with American Union Swedish Singers on European Concert Tour, 1897; Pupil of 
Williams Nelson Bur^itt, 1898-1900; Concert and Oratorio Artist, 1900 — ; Pupil of Max 
Heinrich, 1900-1901 ; B. M., Chicago Conservatory of Music, 1902 ; Instructor and Concert 
Artist, ibid., 1903-1904; Professor of Music, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1904 — , 

Office M 30 ; Res. 225 N. Fourteenth St. 

FRANCIS SIEGEL SCHOENLEBER, D. V. S., 

Professor of Veterinary Medicine. 

B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1885; Assistant in Agriculture, ibid., 1885-1888; M. S. A., 
ibid., 1887; Associate Editor, Orange Judd Farmer, Chicago, 1888-1890; D. V. S., Chicago 
Veterinary College, 1890; Private Veterinary Practice, 1890-1896; Dean, McKillup Vet- 
erinary College, Chicago, 1896-1899; and 1901-1905; M. D., Harvey Medical College, Chi- 
cago, 1901; M. D., National Medical University, Chicago, 1901; Private Human Practice, 
1901-1903; Professor of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1905 — . 

Office V 30; Res. 508 Houston St. 

JOHN HAROLD MILLER, A. M., 

Dean of the Division of College Extension. 

A. B., Central Normal College (Danville, Indiana), 1882; President, Campbell College, 
1882-1888; with D. C. Heath and Company, 1888-1890; Publisher Northwestern Monthly, 
Lincoln, Nebraska, 1890-1900; Principal State Normal School, Cheney, Washington, 1900- 
1902; Editor and Publisher, Holton (Kansas) Tribune, 1902-1905; Superintendent of 
Agricultural Extension, Kansas State Agricultural College,- 1905-1911; Director of College 
Extension, 'ibid., 1911-1912; Dean of the Division of College Extension, ibid., 1912 — . 

Office A 33; Res. 1610 Leavenworth St. 

JOHN ORR HAMILTON, B. S., 

Professor of Physics, in Charge of Electrical Engineering. 

Student, Monmouth College, 1888-1890 ; Superintendent, Roseville (Illinois) Public 
Schools, 1894-1898; B. S., University of Chicago, 1900; Instructor in Science, Mount Bar- 
bara Military Academy (Salina), 1900-1901; Assistant in Physics, Kansas State Agricul- 
tural College, 1901-1903; Assistant Professor in Physics, ibid., 1903-1908; Professor of 
Physics, ibid., 1908 — ; in Charge of Electrical Engineering, ibid., January 1, 1913 — . 

Office O 57; Res. 6 Park Road. 

MARY PIERCE VAN ZILE, 

Dean of the Division of Home Economics, Professor of Domestic Science. 

Instructor, Winfield (Iowa) Schools, 1888-1889; Student, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, 1889-1891; Principal, Wayland (Iowa) High School, 1891-1892; Teacher's 
Diploma, Iowa State College, 1902; Instructor in Domestic Science, ibid,, 1902-1903; Stu- 
dent, Graduate School of Domestic Science, University of Illinois, Summer, 1903; Domestic 
Science Lecturer and Demonstrator at Chautauquas, Summers of 1903-1905 ; Instructor in 
Domestic Science and Art, Township High School, Chicago, 1903-1908; Professor of 
Domestic Science, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1908 — ; Dean of Women, ibid., 1908- 
1913; Dean of the Division of Home Economics, 1913 — . 

Office L 30 ; Res. 1322 Fremont St. 



10 Kansas State Agricultural College 

LOWELL EDWIN CONRAD, M. S., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Chainman, Union Pacific Railroad Company, 1899 ; Chainman, Illinois Central Railroad 
•Company, 1900; Levelman, Vicksburg National Military Park, 1900-1901; Field Drafts- 
man, Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gulf Railroad Company, 1901; Instrument Man, Mexican 
Central Railway Company, 1902-1903; B. S., Cornell College (Iowa), 1904; Inspector and 
Instrument man on Sewer Construction, Centralia, Illinois, 1904; Assistant Engineer on 
Construction, Gulf Terminus of the Tehauntepec Route, Mexico, 1905-1906; C. E., Cornell 
College (Iowa), 1906; Instructor and Graduate Student in Civil Engineering, Lehigh 
University, 1906-1908; M. S., ibid., 1908; Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1908-1909; Professor of Civil Engineering, ibid., 1909 — . 

Office E 31; Res. 317 N. Seventeenth St. 

CHARLES ANDERSON SCOTT, B. S., 

Kansas State Forester. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1901; Forest Expert, United States Forest 
-Service, 1901-1904; Graduate Student, Yale University Forest School, 1904-1905; Forest 
Supervisor, United States Forest Service, 1905-1907; Special Lecturer on Forestry Sub- 
jects, University of Nebraska, Winters, 1906 and 1907; Professor of Forestry, Iowa State 
^College, 1908-1910; Kansas State Forester, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910 — , 

Office H 28; Res. 311 N. Eighteenth St. 

LESLIE ARTHUR FITZ, B. S. ? 
Professor of Milling Industry. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1902; Grain Investigation, United States 
Department of Agriculture, 1902-1906; Office of Grain Standardization, ibid., 1906-1910; 
in Charge of Department of Milling Industry, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910- 
1912; Professor of Milling Industry, ibid., 1912 — . 

Office Ag 39; Res. 1014 Houston St. 

EDWIN LEE HOLTON, A. B., 

Professor of Education, Director of the Summer School. 

Graduate, Indiana State Normal School, 1900; Principal, Township Consolidated 
Schools, Madison County, Indiana, 1900-1902; A. B., University of Indiana, 1904; Gradu- 
ate Student, ibid., "Winter and Spring Terms, 1904; Superintendent City Schools, Holton, 
Kansas, 1904-1906; Superintendent City Schools, Noblesville, Indiana, 1906-1908; Gradu- 
ate Student, Columbia University, 1908-1910; Supervisor Industrial Schools, New York 
City, 1909-1910; Professor of Rural Education, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910- 
1913; Director of the Summer School, ibid., 1910 — ; Professor of Education, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office A 32; Res. 217 Park Road. 

ANDREY ABRAHAM POTTER, S. B., 

Professor of Steam and Gas Engineering; Acting Dean of the Division 
of Mechanic Arts; Acting Director of Engineering Experiment 
Station. 

S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1903 ; Engineer in Experimental Steam 
Turbine Department, General Electric Company, Schenectady, New York, 1903-1905; 
O-raduate Student, Columbia University, Summer Session, 1908 ; with General Electric 
Company, Lynn, Massachusetts, Summer, 1913; Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1905-1910; Professor of Steam and Gas 
Engineering, ibid., 1910 — ; in Charge of Mechanical Engineering, ibid., 1910 — ; Acting 
Dean of the Division of Mechanic Arts, and Acting Director of Engineering Experiment 
Station, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office E 30; Res. 1328 Fremont St. 

ROY ANDREW SEATON, M. S., 

Professor of Applied Mechanics and Machine Design. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1904; Assistant in Mathematics, ibid., 1904- 
1906; Assistant Professor, ibid., 1906; Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin, 
Summer Session, 1908; Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, 1907-1909; Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, ibid., 1909-1910; 
M.S., ibid., 1910; Graduate Student, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1910-1911; 
S. B., ibid., 1911; in Turbine Drafting Department, General Electric Company, Lynn, 
Massachusetts, 1911-1912; Professor of Applied Mechanics and Hydraulics, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, 1910-1914; Professor of Applied Mechanics and Machine Design, 
ibid., 1914—. 

Office S 61; Res. 722 Humboldt St. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 11 

WILLIAM M JARDINE, B. S. A., 

Dean of the Division of Agriculture, Director of the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station. 

B. S. A., Utah Agricultural College, 1904; Instructor in Agronomy, ibid., 1904-1905; 
Manager, Utah Arid Farming Company, Utah, 1905; Assistant Professor of Agronomy, 
Utah Agricultural College, 1905 ; Student, Graduate School of Agriculture, University of 
Illinois, 1906; Professor of Agronomy, Utah Agricultural College, 1906-1907; Assistant 
Cerealist, United States Department of Agriculture, 1907-1910; Professor of Agronomy, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910-1913 ; Instructor in Field Crops, Graduate School 
of Agriculture, Michigan Agricultural College, 1912; Acting Dean of the Division of Agri- 
culture, and Acting Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station, ibid., January 1 - 
September 1, 1913; Dean of the Division of Agriculture, and Director of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office Ag 33 ; Res. 1020 Houston St. 

JAMES WILLIAM SEARSON, A. M., 

Professor of the English Language. 

Principal, Weeping Water (Nebraska) High School, 1894-1895; Instructor and Lec- 
turer in State and County Teachers' Institutes, 1895 — ; A. B., University of Nebraska, 
1896; Fellow in History, ibid., 1896-1898; A.M., ibid., 1899; Superintendent, Wahoo 
(Nebraska) Schools, 1899-1905 ; Professor of English and Rhetoric, Nebraska State 
Normal School, (Peru), 1905-1910; Associate Professor of English, Kansas State Agricul- 
tural College, 1910-1911; Professor of the English Language, ibid., 1911 — . 

Office K 37; Res. 1320 Fremont St. 

OLLIE EZEKIEL REED, M. S., 

Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

B. S., College of Agriculture, University of Missouri, 1908; Assistant in Dairy Hus- 
bandry, ibid., 1908-1909; Instructor in Milk* Production, Purdue University, 1909-1910; 
M. S., University of Missouri, 1910; Assistant Professor in Charge of Department of Dairy 
Husbandry, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910-1911; Professor of Dairy Husbandry, 
ibid., 1911—. 

Office D 30; Res. 1221 Laramie St. 

GUY SUMNER LOWMAN, B. P. E., 

Professor of Physical Education; Director of Physical Training. 

B.Di., Iowa State Normal School, 1903; B. P. E., International School of Physical 
Training, Springfield, Massachusetts, 1905; Director of Physical Training, Brookline 
(Massachusetts) High School, 1905-1907; Graduate Student, Harvard Summer School of 
Physical Education, Summer, 1907 ; Director of Physical Education, Warrensburg (Mis- 
souri) State Normal School, 1907-1908; Instructor in Physical Education, University of 
Missouri, 1908-1910; Professor of Physical Training and Director of Athletics, University 
of Alabama, 1910-1911; Professor of Physical Edueation and Director of Physical Train- 
ing, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911 — . 

Office N 37; Res. 4 Park Road. 

ARTHUR BOURNE SMITH, B. L. S., 

Librarian. 

Librarian in Charge, Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, New York, 1892-1895; Principal, 
Smithboro (New York) Public Schools, 1895-1896; Assistant in Library, Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, 1896-1900; Ph. B., Wesleyan University, 1900; Library Assistant, University of 
Illinois, 1900-1902; B. L. S., ibid., 1902; Assistant Editor, Cumulative Book Index United 
States Catalogue, and Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature, June-September, 1902 ; 
Lecturer on Bibliography, University of California, 1903; Head of Order Department of 
Library, ibid., 1903 - June, 1911; Head of Accessions Division of Library, ibid., July- 
August, 1911; Instructor in Summer School, ibid., 1906 and 1907; Librarian, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1911 — . 

Office F 32 ; Res. 1020 Poyntz Ave. 

WILLIAM ADAMS LIPPINCOTT, B. S., 

Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

A. B., Illinois College, 1903; Secretary, Young Men's Christian Association, Chicago; 
1903-1904; Student, Chicago Theological Seminary, 1904-1906; Poultry Farming, 1906; 
Graduate Student, Cornell University, 1906-1907; Superintendent of Poultry Farm, Iowa 
State College, 1907-1908; Student Assistant in Poultry, ibid., 1908-1910; Student, Gradu- 
ate School of Agriculture, Ames, Iowa, Summer, 1910 ; Assistant in Charge of Poultry, 
Iowa State College, 1910-1911; B. S., ibid., 1911; Assistant Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry in Charge of Poultry, ibid., 1911; Professor of Poultry Husbandry, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office Ag 101; Res. 710 Humboldt St. 



12 Kansas State Agricultural College 

WILBER ANDREW COCHEL, A. B., B. S., 

Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

A. B., University of Missouri, 1897; Assistant in Agronomy Department, St. Louis 
World's Pair, 1903; in Charge of Holsteins in Dairy Test, ibid., 1904; B. S„ University of 
Missouri, 1905 ; Fellow in Animal Husbandry, ibid., 1905-1906 ; Assistant in Animal Hus- 
bandry, Purdue University, 1906-1907; Associate in Animal Husbandry, ibid., 1907-1909; 
Professor of Animal Husbandry, Pennsylvania State College, 1909-1912; Professor of 
Animal Husbandry, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office Ag 8; Res. 209 N. Fourteenth St. 

LELAND DAVID BUSHNELL, B. S., 
Professor of Bacteriology. 

B. S., Michigan Agricultural College, 1905 ; Assistant in Bacteriology, ibid., 1906-1907 ; 
Expert in Dairy Bacteriology, Bureau of Animal Industry, University of Wisconsin, 1908- 
1909; Assistant in Bacteriology, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909-1910; Instructor 
in Bacteriology, ibid., 1910-1911; Assistant Professor in Charge of Department of Bac- 
teriology, ibid., 1911-1912; Professor of Bacteriology, ibid., 1912 — . 

Office V 54.; Res. 1414 Humboldt St. 

BESSIE WEBB BIRDSALL, 
Professor of Domestic Art. 

Student, Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1900-1901; Instructor in Do- 
mestic Art, Hill School, Florence, Massachusetts, 1901-1902; Graduate, Normal Domestic 
Art Course, Drexel Institute, 1903 ; Head of Department of Domestic Art, Winthrop State 
Normal and Industrial College, Rock Hill, South Carolina, 1903-1912; Instructor in Do- 
mestic Art, Vacation School, Buffalo, New York, Summer, 1906; Graduate Student, 
Teachers' College, Columbia University, Summers, 1911, 1912; Professor of Domestic Art, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office L 55; Res. 113 S. Eighth St. 

ROY ALISON HILL, Second Lieutenant, Seventh United States Infantry, 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics; Commandant of Cadets. 

Cadet, United States Military Academy, 1904-1908 ; Second Lieutenant, Seventh United 
States Infantry, 1908 — ; Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Commandant of 
Cadets, Kansas State Agricultural College, February 15, 1913 — . 

Office N 29 ; Res. 113 S, Eighth St. 

LELAND EVERETT CALL, M. S., 

Professor of Agronomy. 

B. S. (Agr.), Ohio State University, 1906; Teaching Fellow, ibid., 1906-1907; Assist- 
ant in Agronomy, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1907-1908; Assistant Professor of 
Soils, ibid., 1908-1911; Associate Professor of Soils, ibid., 1911-1913; Graduate Student, 
Ohio State University, 1912; M.S., ibid., 1912; Professor of Agronomy, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, 1913- — . 

Office Ag 58; Res. 609 N. Ninth St. 

GEORGE ADAM DEAN, M. S., 
Professor of Entomology. 

B. B. } Kansas State Agricultural College, 1895; State Teacher's Certificate, 1898; Prin- 
cipal, Highland Park (Topeka) Public School, 1898-1902; Assistant in Entomology, Kan- 
sas State Agricultural College, 1902-1905 ; M. S., ibid., 1905 ; Instructor in Entomology, 
ibid., 1905-1907; Assistant Professor of Entomology, ibid., 1907-1912; Associate Professor 
of Entomology, ibid., 1912-1913; Professor of Entomology, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office F 52; Res. 511 Juliette Ave. 

ROBERT KIRKLAND NABOURS, Ph. D., 

Professor of Zoology; Curator of the Natural History Museum. 

Ed. B., School of Education, University of Chicago, 1905 ; Teacher of Natural History, 
and Assistant Curator of the Museum, ibid., 1905-1909; Graduate Student in Zoology, 
University of Chicago, 1907-1910; Assistant in Zoology, ibid., 1909-1910; Instructor in 
Zoology, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910-1911; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 
1911; Assistant Professor of Zoology, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911-1913; Pro- 
fessor of Zoology, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office F 54; Res. 714 Poyntz Ave. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 13 

LEONARD WHITTLESEY GOSS, D. V. M., 

Professor of Pathology. 

D. V. M., Ohio State University, 1905; Assistant in Veterinary Science, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, 1905-1907; Graduate Student, University of Michigan, Summer, 1906; 
Instructor in Veterinary Science, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1907-1909; Graduate 
Student, Tieraerztliche Hochschule, Berlin, Germany, 1911-1912; Graduate Student, Uni- 
versity of Berlin, 1912 ; Assistant Professor of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, 1909-1913; Professor of Pathology, ibid., December 1, 1913 — . 

Office V 56 ; Res. 723 Houston St. 

RALPH RALPH DYKSTRA, D. V. M., 

Professor of Surgery. 

Registered Pharmacist in Iowa, 1900; D. V, M., Iowa State College, 1905; Assistant 
Professor of Anatomy, Obstetrics, and Clinics, ibid., 1905-1907; Associate Professor of 
Anatomy, Obstetrics, and Clinics, ibid., 1907-1909; Professor of Anatomy, Obstetrics, and 
Clinics, ibid., 1909-1911; Veterinary Inspector, United -States Bureau of Animal Industry, 
Summer, 1911; Assistant Professor of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, 1911-1913; Professor of Surgery, ibid., December 1, 1913 — . 

Office V 31; Res. 714 Houston St. 

WALTER SCOTT GEARHART, B. S. in C. E., 

Professor of Highway Engineering^ ; State Highway Engineer, Division 
of College Extension. 

Student, Bucknell University, 1899-1902; Chainman, United States Coal and Coke 
Company (West Virginia) ; Transitman, Pennsylvania Railroad Company (Pennsylvania) 
and Pere Marquette Railroad Company (Michigan) ; Assistant Engineer, Chicago and 
Alton Railroad Company (Missouri); Assistant State Highway Engineer, Illinois State 
Highway Commission; B. S. in C. E., University of Missouri, 1907; Highway Engineer, 
Division of College Extension, Kansas State Agricultural College, 190,9-1911; State Engi- 
neer, ibid., 1911 — ; Professor of Highway Engineering, ibid., 1914 — . 

Office A 36; Res. 1010 Vattier St. 



Professor of Electrical Engineering. 



Professor of Heating and Sanitation. 

ULA MAY DOW, B. S., A. M., 

Associate Professor in Charge of Domestic Science. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1905; Teacher's Diploma, Massachusetts 
State Normal School, 1906; Assistant in Domestic Science, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, 1906; Instructor in Domestic Science, ibid., 1906-1909; Assistant Professor of 
Domestic Science, ibid., 1909-1913; A.M. in Education, Columbia University, 1913; 
Associate Professor in Charge of Domestic Science, Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1913—. 

Office L 30; Res. R. R. No. 1. 

MICHAEL FRANCIS AHEARN, M. S., 

Associate Professor of Horticulture. 

B. S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1904; Assistant in Horticulture, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1904-1909; Head Coach in Athletics, ibid., 1905-1911; In- 
structor in Horticulture, ibid., 1909-1911; M.S., ibid., 1913; Assistant Professor, of 
floriculture, ibid., 1911-1913; Associate Professor of Horticulture, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office H 32; Res. 507 Laramie St. 

6. Effective September 1, 1914. 



14 Kansas State Agricultural College 

HARRY LLEWELLYN KENT, B. S., 

Principal of School of Agriculture; Associate Professor of Education. 

Graduate, Kansas State Normal School, 1904; Assistant, Science Department, ibid., 
1902-1904; Instructor in Science and Geography, "Western State Normal School, 1904- 
1909; Student, University of Chicago, Summer, 1908; Special Student, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, Summer, 1909; Instructor in Nature Study and Elementary Agri- 
culture, New Hampshire State Normal School, 1909-1911; Student, Cornell University, 
Summer, 1910; Director of Instruction by Correspondence, Division of College Extension, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911-1913; A. B. ; Kansas State Normal School, 1912; 
B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 ; Principal of School of Agriculture, and 
Associate Professor of Education, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office G 29 and 30; Res. 321 Delaware Ave. 

WILLIAM HIDDLESON ANDREWS, A. B., 

Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Principal, Beloit High School, 1897-1898; A. B., University of Chicago, 1900; Superin- 
tendent, Blue Rapids City Schools, 1901-1905; Instructor in Mathematics, Leavenworth 
High School, 1905-1906; Assistant in Mathematics, Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1906-1907; Graduate Student, University of Chicago, Summer, 1911; Assistant Professor 
of Mathematics, ibid., 1907 - December 1, 1913; Principal of Subfreshman Department, 
ibid., 1910-1913; Associate Professor of Mathematics, ibid., December 1, 1913 — . 

Office A 64; Res. 630 Moro St. 

HARRY BRUCE WALKER, B. S. in C. E., 

Associate Prof essor of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering 6 ; Drainage 
Engineer, College of Extension. 

Student, Iowa State College, 1906-1910; Topographer, Chicago, Burlington and Quincy 
Railroad Company, 1906-1907; Student Assistant, Iowa State College, 1909-1910; Drafts- 
man, Great Northern Railway Company, 1910; Drainage Engineer, Humboldt, Iowa, 1909- 
1910; B. S. in C. E., Iowa State College, 1910; Drainage Engineer, Division of College 
Extension, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910 — ; Associate Professor of Irrigation 
and Drainage Engineering, ibid., 1914 — . 

Office A 36; Res. 712 Poyntz Ave. 

WALTER WILLIAM CARLSON, B. S., 

Associate Professor of Shop Practice 6 ; Superintendent of Shops. 

Apprentice in Machine Shops, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1903-1904; B. S., 
ibid., 1908; Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, Montana State College, 1908-1909; 
Graduate Student, Armour Institute, Summer, 1909; Assistant Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering, Montana State College, 1909-1910; Assistant in Machine Tool "Work, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1910-1911; Instructor in Machine Tool Work, ibid., 1911-1912; 
Foreman of Machine Shop, ibid., 1910-1912; Superintendent of Shops, ibid., 1912 — ; 
Assistant Professor of Shop Methods and Practice, ibid., 1912-1914; Associate Professor 
of Shop Practice, ibid., 1914 — . 

Office S 62; Res. 1130 Bluemont Ave. 

GEORGE KELLER HELDER, 

Superintendent, Fort Hays Branch Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Student, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1888-1890; Clerk, First National Bank, 
Manhattan, 1891-1901; Cashier, ibid., 1901-1904; Bookkeeper, Fort Hays Branch Experi- 
ment Station, 1904-1906; Secretary, ibid., 1907-1908; Assistant Superintendent and Sec- 
retary, ibid., 1909 -January 1, 1913 ; Superintendent, ibid., January 1, 1913 — . 

Office and Res. Hays, Kansas. 

GEORGE SHERWOOD HINE, B. S. A., 

State Dairy Commissioner. 

B. S. A., University of Wisconsin, 1907; Student Instructor in Farm Engineering, 
ibid., 1907; Assistant in Feed and Fertilizer Inspection and Dairy Tests, ibid., 1907-1908; 
Principal, Marinette (Wisconsin) County School of Agriculture and Domestic Economy, 
1909; Lecturer on Dairying, Department of College Extension, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, 1910-1912; State Dairy Commissioner, 1912 — . 

Office X 26; Res. 501 Laramie St. 

6. Effective September 1, 1914. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 15 

JACOB LUND, M. S., 
. Superintendent of Heat and Power. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1883 ; Steam Fitter and Instructor in Black- 
smithing, ibid., 1883-1886; M. S. f ibid., 1886; Machinist, Santa Fe Railroad Shops, Topeka, 
1886-1888; with Las Vegas Hot Springs Company, Las "Vegas Hot Springs, New Mexico, 
1888-1891; General Repairer, Sidney (Washington) Shingle Mill, 1891-1892; Engineer 
and Fireman, Capital Iron Works, Topeka, 1892-1893; Steam Fitter and Fireman, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1893-1898; Engineer, ibid., 1898-1901; Superintendent, Heat 
and Power Department, ibid., 1901-1912; Superintendent of Heat, Water, and Gas Dis- 
tribution, ibid., 1912-1914; Superintendent of Heat and Power, ibid., 19 K' ■*. 

Office S 34; Res. 1420 Fairchild Ave. 

ROBERT HENRY BROWN, B. M., 

Assistant Professor of Music. 

B. M., Kansas Conservatory of Music, 1893 ; B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1898; Special Student, Chicago Musical College, 1898-1900; Instructor in Violin and Band 
Instruments, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1900-1905; Assistant Professor of Music 
and Director of Orchestra, ibid., 1905 — . 

Office M 27; Res. 331 N. Seventeenth St. 

PLEASANT CRABTREE, 

Lecturer on Farm Management^ Division of College Extension. 

Student, Fort Scott Normal Institute, 1885; Student, Lamar (Missouri) Normal In- 
stitute, 1885-1889 ; Instructor, Missouri Public Schools, 1886-1889 ; Student, Denver Busi- 
ness College, 1897; Editor, Agricultural and Live Stock Herald, Denver, 1897-1900; Lec- 
turer, Missouri Farmers' Institutes, 1900-1904; Lecturer on Farm Management, Division 
of College Extension, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1908 — . 

Office A 36; Res. 931 Moro St. 

HERBERT HIRAM KING, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry; Assistant Chemist in Engineering 
Experiment Station. 

A. B., Swing College, 1904; Professor of Chemistry, Manchester College, 1904-1906; 
A. M., Ewing College, 1906 ; Assistant in Chemistry, Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1906-1908; Instructor in Chemistry, ibid., 1908-1909; Graduate Student in Physical 
Chemistry, University of Chicago, Summer Session, 1909; Assistant Professor of Chem- 
istry, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909 — ; Assistant Chemist, Engineering Experi- 
ment Station, ibid., 1910 — . 

Office C 56; Res. 916 Humboldt St. 

CHARLES OSCAR SW ANSON, M. Agr., 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Chemistry ; Assistant Chemist in 
Agricultural Experiment Station. 

A. B., Carlton College, 1899; Principal, Jackson (Minnesota) High School, 1899-1900; 
Instructor, Cannon Falls (Minnesota) High School, 1900-1903 ; M. Agr., University of 
Minnesota, 1905; Instructor in Agricultural Chemistry and Assistant Chemist in Experi- 
ment Station, Purdue University, 1905-1906 ; Assistant Chemist in Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1906 — ; Assistant Professor of Agri- 
cultural Chemistry, ibid., 1909 — . 

Office C 6; Res. 931 Bluemont Ave. 

GEORGE EBEN BRAY, M. E., 

Industrial Engineer, Division of College Extension. 

M. E., University of Minnesota, 1894; Instructor in Manual Training, Logan High 
School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1897-1898; Supervisor of Manual Training, Superior 
(Wisconsin) Public Schools, 1900-1903; Graduate Student, Columbia University, Summer, 
1902 ; Graduate Student, University of Minnesota, Summer, 1903 ; Director of Mechanical 
Drawing and Manual Arts, New Trier Township High School, Kenilworth, Illinois, 1903- 
1909; Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1909-1910; Superintendent of Shops, ibid., 1909 — ; Assistant Professor of Shop Methods 
and Practice, ibid., 1910-1912; Industrial Engineer, Division of College Extension, ibid., 
1912—. 

Office A 34; Res. 817 Osage St. 



16 Kansas State Agricultural College 

WILMER ESLA DAVIS, A. B., 

Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Graduate, Ohio Normal University. 1894; Public School Work, 1894-1900; A. B., Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1903; Principal, Rossville (Illinois) High School, 1903-1904; Instructor, 
Great Falls (Montana) High School, 1904-1905; Instructor in Science, Urbana (Illinois) 
High School, 1905-1908; Graduate Student in Botany, University of Chicago, 1908-1909, 
and Summers, 1908, 1909, and 1910; Assistant Professor of Botany, Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, 1909 — . 

Office H 57; Res. 831 Leavenworth St. 

FRANCES LANGDON BROWN, B. S., 

Lecturer on Domestic Science, Division of College Extension. 

Graduate, Kansas State Normal School, 1898 and 1906 ; Instructor, Madison (Kansas) 
City Schools, 1899-1900; Instructor, Shorey Public Schools, 1901-1902; Instructor, Topeka 
City Schools, 1902-190S; Student, State Manual Training Normal School, 1908; B. S., 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909; A. B., Kansas State Normal School, 1913; 
Lecturer on Domestic Science, Division of College Extension, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, 1909—. 

Office A 35; Res. 519 Houston St. 

JAMES HENRY BURT, D. V. M., 

Assistant Professor of Veterinary Medicine. 

V. S., Ontario Veterinary College, 1895; Private Practice, 1895-1903; D. V. M., Ohio 
State University, 1905; Veterinary Inspector, United States Bureau of Animal Industry, 
1905-1909; Assistant in Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909- 
1910; Graduate Student, University of Michigan, Summer, 1910; Assistant Professor of 
Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910 — . 

Office V 27; Res, 811 Poyntz Ave. 

ARTHUR HENRY LEIDIGH,* B. S., 

Assistant Professor of Crops. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1902 ; Farm Hand, 1902-1903 ; with Office of 
Grain Investigations, United States Department of Agriculture, as Superintendent of 
Experiment Station, Channing, Texas, 1903-1905; Superintendent Experiment Station, 
Amarillo, Texas, 1905-1908; Farmer, Hutchinson, Kansas, 1908-1911; Collaborator, 
United States Department of Agriculture, 1908-1911; Assistant Professor of Crops, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1911 - October 1, 1913. 

EVERETT PARKER JOHNSTON, A. B., 

Assistant Professor in Charge of Public Speaking. 

A. B., Oberlin College, 1897; Graduate, Emerson College of Oratory, 1899; Instructor 
in Public Speaking, University of North Dakota, 1899-1902 ; Graduate Student, University 
o/ Chicago, Summer, 1901; Reader under Management Chicago Lyceum Bureau, 1907- 
1909; Assistant in Public Speaking, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909-1910; In- 
structor in Public Speaking, ibid., 1910-1911; Assistant Professor in Charge of Public 
Speaking, 1911 — . 

Office F 3 ; Res. 608 Bluemont Ave. 

ALFRED EVERETT WHITE, M. S., 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

B. S., Purdue University, 1904; Principal, Lapel (Indiana) High School, 1904-1906; 
Instructor, Shortridge High School, Indianapolis, 1906-1907; Principal, Connersville 
(Indiana) High School, 1907-1909; Assistant in Mathematics, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, 1909-1910; Instructor in Mathematics, ibid., 1910-1912; Assistant Professor of 
Mathematics, ibid., 1912 — . 

Office A 72; Res. 712 Poyntz Ave. 

CHARLES WILBUR McCAMPBELL, B. S., D. V. M., 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

B. S.. Kansas State Agricultural College, 1906; Graduate Student, ibid., 1906-1907; 
D. V. M., ibid., 1910; Assistant in Animal Husbandry, ibid., 1910-1912; Secretary, Kansas 
State Live Stock Registry Board, 1912 — ; Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry, Kan- 
sas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office Ag 5; Res. 801 Laramie St. 

1. . Resigned. 



Fifty- first Annual Catalogue 17 

GEORGE OGDEN GREENE, M. S., 

Lecturer on Horticulture, Division of College Extension. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1900; Assistant in Horticulture, ibid., 1901- 
1903 ; M. S., ibid., 1902 ; Assistant in Horticulture, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
1903-1905; with Worley and Greene, Merchants, 1905-1910; Lecturer on Horticulture, 
Division of College Extension, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office A 36; Res. 915 Fremont St. 

EDWARD CARL JOHNSON, A. M., 

Superintendent of Farmers' Institutes and Demonstrations, Division of 
College Extension, 

Student Assistant in Botany, University of Minnesota, 1905-1906; A. B., ibid., 1906; 
Instructor in Botany, ibid., 1906-1907; A.M., ibid., 1907; Assistant Plant Patholgoist, 
United States Department of Agriculture, 1907 ; Plant Pathologist, in Charge of Cereal 
Disease Work, ibid., 1898-1912; Graduate Student, George "Washington University, 1910- 
1911; Superintendent of Farmers' Institutes and Demonstrations, Division of College 
Extension, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office A 37; Res. 1130 Houston St. 

CARL OSTRUM, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of the English Language. 

A. B., Bethany College, 1904; A. B., Yale University, 1905; Graduate Student, ibid., 
1905-1907; A.M., ibid., 1906; Instructor in English, Gustavus Adolphus College, 1907- 
1908; Principal, Bunkerhill (Kansas) High School, 1908-1910; Acting Professor of 
English, Tabor College, 1910-1911; Instructor in English, Oklahoma College of Agriculture 
and Mechanic Arts, 1911-1912; Assistant Professor of the English Language, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office A 69; Res. 815 Poyntz Ave. 

ALVIN SCOTT NEALE, B. S. A., 

Assistant Superintendent of Farmers 7 Institutes and Lecturer on Dairy 
Husbandry, Division of College Extension. 

Superintendent of Farm, Ohio State University, 1903-1904; B. S. A., ibid., 1904; Agri- 
cultural Correspondent, Scripps-McRea League of Newspapers, 1904-1907; Dairy Lecturer, 
Agricultural Extension Department, Ohio State University, 1908-1913; Lecturer on Dairy 
Husbandry, Division of College Extension, Kansas State Agricultural College, January 1, 
1913 — ; Assistant Superintendent of Farmers' Institutes, Division of College Extension, 
ibid., 1913—. 

Office A 36; Res. 1 Park Road. 

PORTER JOSEPH NEWMAN, M. S., 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B. S., Franklin College, 1908; Assistant in Chemistry, ibid., 1907-1908; Assistant 
Chemist, Indianapolis Board of Health, 1907-1908; Graduate Student, University of Chi- 
cago, Summer, 1909; Assistant in Chemistry, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909- 
1910; M.S., Franklin College, 1910; Instructor in Chemistry, ibid., 1910-1913; Assistant 
Professor of Chemistry, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office C 64; Res. 914 Leavenworth St. 

WILLIAM CARL LANE, B. S., 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1905; Student Apprentice with Allis-Chalmers 
Company, 1905-1906; Electrical Tester with Allis-Chalmers Company, 1906-1907; Assist- 
ant in Physics, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1907-1908; Assistant in Electrical Engi- 
neering, ibid., 1908-^1913; Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office C 33; Res. 1031 Humboldt St. 

NELSON ANTRIM CRAWFORD, Jr., A. M., 

Assistant Professor of the English Language. 

Newspaper Writer, Iowa City and Council Bluffs (Iowa), 1906-1909; Undergraduate 
Assistant in English, State University of Iowa, 1909-1910; A. B., ibid., 1910; Instructor, 
Kansas Teachers' Institutes, 1912 — ; Graduate Student, University of Kansas, 1913-1914; 
A.M., ibid., 1914; Assistant in English, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910-1911; 
Assistant in the English Language, ibid., 1911-1912 ; Instructor in the English Language, 
ibid., 1912-1913; President, Kansas Association of Teachers of English, 1913 — ; Assistant 
Professor of the English Language, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office A 53; Res. 221 3ST. Juliette Ave. 



18 Kansas State Agricultural College 

JOSIAH SIMSON HUGHES, M. S., 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B. S., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1908; Instructor, ibid., 1908-1909; M.S., ibid., 
1909; Fellow, Ohio State University, 1909-1910; A.M., ibid., 1910; Assistant in Chem- 
istry, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910-1912; Instructor in Chemistry, ibid, 1912- 
1913; Assistant Professor of Chemistry, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office C 41; Res. 607 Vattier St. 

GRACE EMILY DERBY, A. B., 

Assistant Librarian. 

A. B., Western College for Women, Oxford, Ohio, 1905 ; Graduate Student, Illinois 
State Library School, 1905-1906 ; Reference Assistant in Library, University of Illinois, 
1906-1907; Librarian, Western College for Women, 1907-1911; Reference Librarian, Kan- 
sas State Agricultural College, 1911-1913; Assistant Librarian, ibid., 1913 — 

Office F 32 ; Res. 1633 Fairchild Ave. 

RAY IAMS THROCKMORTON, B. S., 
Assistant Professor of Soils. 

B. S., Pennsylvania State College, 1911; Assistant in Soils, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, February, 1912-1913; Assistant Professor of Soils, 1913 — . 

Office Ag 60; Res. 815 Poyntz Ave. 

JAMES EDWARD ACKERT, Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Zoology; Parasitologist in Agricultural Experi- 
■ ment Station. 

Graduate, Northern Illinois State Normal School, 1903; Principal, Algonquin (Illinois) 
High School, 1903-1907; A. B., University of Illinois, 1909; Graduate Assistant in 
Zoology, ibid., 1909-1911; A.M., ibid., 1911; Fellow in Zoology, ibid., 1911-1913; Gradu- 
ate Student, University of Illinois, Summer, 1910; Graduate Student, Biological Station of 
University of Colorado, Tolland, Colorado, Summer, 1910; Graduate Student (Collector), 
Marine Biological Station, San Diego, California, Summer, 1911; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois, 1913 ; Professor of "Vertebrate Zoology and Physiology, Illinois State Normal Uni- 
versity, Summer, 1913; Instructor in Zoology, University of Washington (one month), 
1913 ; Assistant Professor of Zoology and Parasitologist in Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office F 62; Res. 901 Laramie St. 

HOWARD W BRUBAKER, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B. S., Carleton College, 1899; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1904; Professor of 
Chemistry, Whitman College, 1904-1911; Honorary Fellow, Cornell University, 1911-1912; 
Instructor in Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Carnegie Institute of Technology, 
1912-1913 ; Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office W 27; Res. 1116 Fremont St. 

JOHN WALTER GOOD, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of English Literature. 

A. B., Erskine College, Duewest, South Carolina, 1902; A.M., ibid., 1904; Graduate, 
Erskine Theological Seminary, 1904; Graduate, Pittsburg (Pennsylvania) Theological 
Seminary, 1905; Pastor, First United Presbyterian Church, Corsicana, Texas, 1905-1906; 
Pastor, United Presbyterian Church, Birmingham, Michigan, 1906-1908; Superintendent 
of Public Schools, Albion, Illinois, 1908-1910; Scholar and Fellow in Graduate School, 
University of Illinois, 1910-1913; Ph.D., ibid., 1913; Assistant Professor of English Lit- 
erature, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office A 58; Res. 807 Osage St. 

JOHN C WERNER, A. M„ 

Director of Instruction by Correspondence, Division of College Ex- 
tension. 

Graduate, Tri-State Normal School, Angola, Indiana, 1899; Principal, Perry Town- 
ship Consolidated Schools, Miami County, Indiana, 1899-1904; A. B., University of Indi- 
ana, 1905; Instructor in Mathematics, West Side High School, Lafayette, Indiana 1905- 
1906; County Superintendent of Schools, Fulton County, Indiana, 1906-1911; President, 
Rochester (Indiana) Normal University, 1911-1912; Graduate Student, University of 
Chicago, 1912-1913 ; A. M., ibid., 1913 ; Director of Instruction by Correspondence, Kan- 
sas State Agricultural College, September 25, 1913 — . 

Office A 34; Res. 1000 Kearney St. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 19 

SAMUEL CECIL SALMON, B. S., 

Assistant Professor of Farm Crops. 

B. S., South Dakota Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1907; Special Agent, United 
States Department of Agriculture, 1908-1910; Plant Physiologist, ibid., 1911-1913; Assist- 
ant Professor of Farm Crops, Kansas State Agricultural College, October 1, 1913 — . 

Office Ag 82; Res. 1638 Leavenworth St. 

EDWARD HARTMAN REISNER, Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Education. 

B. E., Cumberland Valley State Normal School, Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, 1901; 
A. B., Yale University, 1908; Larned Fellow, ibid., 1908-1909; A.M., ibid., 1909; 
Graduate Student, Columbia University, 1909-1911; Ph.D., ibid., 1914; Secretary, Na- 
tional Society for the Promotion of Industrial Education, 1910-1911; Professor of Phi- 
losophy and Education, Washburn College, 1911 - November 1, 1913 ; Assistant Professor 
of Education, Kansas State Agricultural College, November 1, 1913 — . 

Office A 66; Res. 1636 Osage St. 

EDWARD DONALD BAKER, A. M., 
Assistant Professor of Rural Economics. 

A. B., University of Chicago, 1903; Graduate Student in Economics, ibid., 1903-1904; 
Principal, Accomac (Virginia) High School, 1904-1905; Instructor in Economics and 
Civics, Superior (Wisconsin) High School, 1905-1908; Instructor in Economics and Civics, 
West High School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1908-1911; A.M., Columbia University, 1912 
Graduate Student in Economics and Political Science, University of Chicago, 1912-1913 , 
Lecturer on Economics, Walton School of Accountancy, and Chicago School of Civics and 
Philanthropy, Chicago, 1913; Assistant Professor of Rural Economics, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, January 1, 1914 — . 

Office A 54; Res. 412 Poyntz Ave. 

CHARLES HENRY TAYLOR, B. S. A., 

Lecturer on Animal Husbandry, Division of College Extension. 

B. S. A., University of Missouri, 1908; Stock and Fruit Farmer, Shubert, Nebraska, 
March, 1909 - December, 1913; Lecturer on Animal Husbandry, Division of College Ex- 
tension, Kansas State Agricultural College, January 1, 1914 — . 

Office A 36; Res. 1021 Osage St. 

HARRISON ELEAZER PORTER, B. S., 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Q 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1907; with Engineering Department, Santa 
Fe Railway, Summer, 1907; Graduate Student, Harvard University, Summer, 1910; 
Graduate Student, Columbia University, Summer, 1911; Assistant in Mathematics, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1908-1912; Instructor in Mathematics, ibid., 1912-1914; 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics, ibid., 1914 — . 

Office A 70; Res. 1024 Houston St. 

WILLIAM TIMOTHY STRATTON, A.M., 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Q 

A. B., University of Indiana, 1906; Superintendent, Oneida (Illinois) Public Schools* 
1906-1907; Principal, McCray-Dewey Academy, Troy, Illinois, 1907-1910; Graduate Stu- 
dent, University of Indiana, Summers, 1910 and 1911; Instructor, Kansas Teaehers' In- 
stitutes, 1911-1913; Assistant in Mathematics, Kansas State Agricriltural College, 1910- 
1912; A.M., University of Indiana, 1913; Instructor in Mathematics, Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, 1912-1914; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, ibid., 1914 — . 

Office A 54; Res. 1020 Yattier St. 

ADA RICE, M. S., 

Assistant Principal of School of Agriculture; Instructor in the English 
' Language. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1895 ; Assistant in English, ibid., 1889-1905 ; 
Life Teacher's Certificate for Kansas, 1900; Graduate Student, University of Chicago, 
1902; Graduate Student, Harvard University Summer School, 1905; Instructor in English,. 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1905-1911; M. S., ibid., 1912; Instructor in the English 
Language, ibid., 1911 — ; Assistant Principal of the School of Agriculture, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office G 28; Res. 917 Osage St. 

6. Effective September 1, 1914. 



20 Kansas State Agricultural College 

DAISY DOROTHY ZEININGER, A. B., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

A. B., Fairmount College, 1900; Instructor, Ellsworth High Sehoal, 1900-1904; Gradu- 
ate Student, University of Chicago, Summer, 1909 ; Assistant in Mathematics, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, 1904-1907; Instructor in Mathematics, ibid., 1907 — . 

Office G 28; Res. 601 Humboldt St. 

BURTON RAY ROGERS,* D. V. M., . 
Instructor in Veterinary Medicine. 

D. V. M., Iowa State College, 1899 ; Graduate Student, McKillip Veterinary College, 
Chicago, 1899-1900; House Physician and Demonstrator of Anatomy in Veterinary De- 
partment, Iowa State College, 1900; Inspector in Bureau of Animal Industry, United 
States Department of Agriculture, 1900-1905; Student, Dearborn Night Medical College, 
Chicago, 1905-1906; Assistant in Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1906-1908; Instructor in Veterinary Medicine, ibid., 1908 - March 1, 1914. 

Office V 32; Res. 1111 Houston St. 

INA FOOTE COWLES, B. S., 

Instructor in Domestic Art, 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1901 ; Graduate Student, Teachers' College, 
Columbia University, 1905-1906; Assistant in Domestic Art, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, 1902-1905 and 1906-1909; Graduate Student, Stout Institute, Menomonie, Wis- 
consin, Summer, 1913 ; Instructor in Domestic Art, Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1909 — . 

Office L 56 \ Res. 1026 Houston St. 

ANNETTE LEONARD, A. B., 

Instructor in the English Language. 

Student, Wellesley College, 1897-1900; Instructor, Topeka City Schools, 1903-1904; 
Reference Library Assistant, University of Kaasas, 1904-1905; A. B., ibid., 1906; Gradu- 
ate Student, ibid., 1906; Assistant in English, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1907- 
1909; Graduate Student, University of Chicago, Summer, 1910; Instructor in English, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909-1911; Instructor in the English Language, ibid., 
1911—. 

Office G 28; Res. 910 Fremont St. 

WILLIAM LEONARD HOUSE, 

Instructor in Woodwork; Foreman of Carpenter Shop. 

Apprentice with J. Adams and Sons Company, Amherst, Massachusetts, 1863-1868; 
with the Newton Wagon Works, Batavia, Illinois; Foreman, Carpenter Shop, Atchison, 
Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad Company, Las Vegas, New Mexico, 1880-1883; Cabinet- 
maker, with The Howell Company, Sioux City, Iowa, 1883-1888; Foreman of Carpenter 
Shop, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1888 — ; Instructor in Woodwork, ibid., 1909 — . 

Office S 28; Res. 608 Moro St. 

JEREMIAH HAFFER HOLLAR,* 

Instructor in Forging; Foreman of Blacks?nith Shop. 

xipprentice in Blacksmithing, Greenspring, Pennsylvania; Foreman, Lake Shore and 
Michigan Southern Railway Shops, White Pigeon, Michigan; with Miller Machine and Iron 
Company, Muskegon, Michigan, 1880-1 S82 • with Novelty Iron Works, ibid., 1882-1885; 
with Rogers Iron Wcrk?, ibid., 1885-1.8 -7; in General Blacksmithing, 1887-1903; In- 
structor, Illinois Manuul Training School, Clenwood, Illinois, 1903-1908; with Ornamental 
Iron Works, Chicago, 1908-1909; Instructor in Forging, Foreman of Blacksmith Shop, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909 — . 

Office S 38; Res. 519 N. Juliette Ave. 

RAYMOND GARFIELD TAYLOR, A. B., 

Instructor in History and Civics. 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1907; Principal and Instructor in History, Hiawatha 
High School, 1907-1910; Graduate Student, University of Kansas, Summer, 1909; Gradu- 
ate Student, University of Chicago, Summer, 1911; Instructor in History and Civics, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910 — . 

Office F 58: Res. 1819 Humboldt St. 

1. Resigned. 

2. Absent on leave after October 1, 1913. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 21 

ESTELLA MAY BOOT, A. M., 

Instructor in the English Language. 

Teacher in Public Schools, Hartley, Iowa, 1897-1898; A. B., University of South Da- 
kota, 1901; Assistant in English and Latin, Cherokee (Iowa) High School, 1901-1906; 
Principal, ibid., 1906-1908; Graduate Student, State University of Iowa, Summer, 1905; 
Instructor in Summer School and Institute, Cherokee County, Iowa, 1907-1908; A.M., 
Northwestern University, 1909; Assistant in English, Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1909-1911; Graduate Student, Columbia University, Summers, 1912 and 1913; Instructor 
in the English Language, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911 — . 

Office K 58 ; Res. Park Place. 

JAMES RUSSELL JENNESS, B. S., 

Instructor in Physics. 

B. S., Denison University, 1906; Professor of Natural Science, Lenox College, 1906- 
1908; Assistant in Physics, University of Kentucky, 1908-1909; Assistant in Physics, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909-1911; Graduate Student, University of Chicago, 
Summers, 1911 and 1912; Instructor in Physics, Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1911-—. 

Office C 61; Res. 1405 Anderson Ave. 

FRANK CLYDE HARRIS,* B. S., 

Instructor in Architecture and Drawing. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1908; City Engineer, Manhattan, Kansas, 
1907-1909; Supervising Engineer, W. K. Palmer Company, 1909; Assistant in Architec- 
ture and Drawing, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909-1911; Graduate Student, 
Chicago Art Institute, Summer, 1910; Student, Italy, Germany, and France, Summer, 
1911; Instructor in Architecture and Drawing, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911 — . 

Office A 66; Res. 630 Bluemont Ave. 

EDWIN CYRUS MILLER, Ph. D., 

Instructor in Botany. 

A. B., Lebanon College, 1906; A. B., Yale University, 1907; Graduate Student, ibid., 
1907-1910; Ph.D., ibid., 1910; Assistant in Botany, Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1910-1911; Instructor in Botany, ibid., 1911 — . 

Office H 56; Res. 514 N. Juliette Ave. 

CHARLES HENRY CLEVENGER, M. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

B. S., Ohio State University, 1902 ; Acting Professor of Mathematics and Physics, 
Drury College, 1903-1904; Instructor in Mathematics, Sheboygan ("Wisconsin) High 
School, 1906-1908; Professor -pro tern, of Pure and Applied Mathematics, Tarkio College, 
Spring Term, 1909; M. S., University of Chicago, 1910; Assistant in Mathematics, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1910-1911; Instructor in Mathematics, ibid., 1911 — . 

Office A 71; Res. 831 Laramie St. 

EUSTACE VIVIAN FLOYD, B. S., 

Instructor in Physics. 

B. S., Earlham College, 1903; Instructor in Chemistry, Westtown School, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, 1903-1905; Professor of Physics, Guilford College, 1905-1909; Graduate 
Student and Assistant in Physics, University of Chicago, 1909-1911; Instructor in Physics, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911 — . 

Office C 57 ; Res. 8 Park Road. 

IVOR VICTOR ILES, A. M., 
Instructor in History and Civics. 

Graduate, Eastern Illinois State Normal School, 1901; A. B., University of Kansas, 
1905; Fellow in European History, ibid., 1904-1905; A.M., ibid., 1905; Graduate Student 
•and Assistant in History, University of Colorado, 1905-1906; Graduate Student and As- 
sistant in European History, University of Wisconsin, 1906-1907; Instructor in History, 
Politics, and Economics, Princeton University, 1907-1908; Harrison Fellow in American 
History, University of Pennsylvania, 1908-1909; Instructor in History, Anaconda (Mon- 
tana) High School, 1909-1910; Instructor in History, Yale University, 1910-1911; In- 
structor in History and Civics, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911 — . 

Office F 58; Res. 712 Poyntz Ave. 

2. Absent on leave after October 1, 1913. 



22 Kansas State Agricultural College 

ERNEST ALEXANDER HEILMAN,* A. M., 
Instructor in German. 

A. B., Northwestern College, 1905; A. B., University of Minnesota, 1906; Instructor, 
Antigo (Wisconsin) High School, 1906-1907; Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin, 
1907-1911; A.M., ibid., 1908; Assistant in German, ibid., 1908-1911; Graduate Student, 
Universities of Berlin and Munich, 1911-1912 ; Instructor in German, Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, 1911 - February 1, 1914. 

JAMES BURGESS FITCH, B. S., 

Instructor in Dairy Husbandry. 

B. S., Purdue University School of Agriculture, 1910; in Charge of Milk Supply, 
Children's Aid Association, Indianapolis, Indiana, Summer, 1910; Assistant in Dairy 
Husbandry, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910-1912; Instructor in Dairy Husbandry, 
ibid., 1912—. 

Office D 30; Res. 1605 Humboldt St. 

THORNTON HAYES, 

Instructor in Machine Tool Work; Foreman of Machine Shop. 

Apprentice, Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company, 1904-1908; Machinist, 
Kansas Natural Gas Company, Scipio and Independence, 1908-1909; Foreman of Machine 
Shop, ibid., 1909-1910; Assistant in Machine Shop, Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1910-1912; Instructor in Machine Tool Work, Foreman of Machine Shop, ibid., 1912 — . 

Office S 31; Res. 1118 Houston St. 

EDWIN GEORGE SCHAFER,* M. S., 

Instructor in Farm Crops. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1907; Assistant in Agronomy, ibid., 1907- 
1909; Graduate Student, University of Illinois, 1909-1910; M. S., ibid., 1910; Assistant in 
Farm Crops, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910-1912; Instructor in Farm Crops, 
ibid., 1912-September 15, 1913. 

OLIVER WILLIAM HUNTER, M. S., 

Instructor in Bacteriology. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909; Student Assistant and Graduate Stu- 
dent in Bacteriology, ibid., 1909-1910; M. S., University of Wisconsin, 1911;. Assistant in 
Bacteriology, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911-1912; Instructor in Bacteriology, 
ibid., 1912 — . 

Office V 52 ; Res. 1100 Bluemont Ave. 

EDWARD GRANT, 

Instructor in Molding; Foreman of Foundry. 

Apprentice, with More and Dargie, Engineers, Millwrights, Iron and Brass Founders, 
Brechin, Forfarshire, Scotland, 1880-1886; with the Chicago Tire and Spring Company, 
Melrose Park, Illinois, 1887-1890 ; Foreman of Foundry, R. Beaumont and Son, Kankakee, 
Illinois, 1890-1897; with the David Bradley Manufacturing Company, Bradley, Illinois, 
1897-1900; Foreman of Foundry Burrell Manufacturing Company, * ibid., 1900-1905; 
Foreman, North Star Iron Works, Hammond, Indiana, 1905-1908; Foreman, Burrell Man- 
ufacturing Company, Bradley, Illinois, 1908-1913; Instructor in Molding, Foreman of 
Foundry, Kansas State Agricultural College, January 7, 1913 — . 

Office S 42; Res. 1217 Kearney St. 

MARY THERESA HARMAN, Ph. D., 

Instructor in Zoology. 

Student Assistant in Botany and Zoology, Indiana State Normal School, 1903-1904; 
Graduate, ibid., 1904; Teaching Fellow, Biological Station, University of Indiana, Sum- 
mer, 1905 ; Instructor in Embryology and Histology, ibid., Summers, 1906-1909, 1911, 
1912; A. B., ibid., 1907; Instructor in Zoology, Pennsylvania State College, 1907-1910; 
A. M., University of Indiana, 1909; Teaching Fellow in Zoology, ibid., 1910-1912; Ph.D., 
ibid., 1912; Instructor in Zoology, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office F 54; Ees. 1415 Fairchild Ave. 

1. Resigned. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 23 



ELDEN VALORIUS JAMES, A. M., 

Instructor in History and Civics. 

Principal, Caywood (Ohio) Public Schools, 1895-1897 and 1901-1902; A. B., Marietta 
College, 1901; Assistant Principal, Williamstown (West Yirginia) High School, 1902- 
1904; A. B., University of Michigan, 1905; Head of Department of History, Monmouth 
"(Illinois) High School, 1905-1906; Principal, West Palm Beach (Florida) High School, 
1906-1908; A.M., Marietta College, 1908; Instructor in History, ibid., Summers, 1902, 
1903, 1908, 1910; Professor of History and Economics, West Virginia Wesleyan College, 
1908-1909; Head of Department of History, Wichita High School, 1909-1911; Vice Prin- 
cipal, ibid., 1911-1912; Instructor, Barber County Normal Institute, 1912; Instructor in 
History and Civics, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office F 1; Res. 621 Humboldt St. 

JOSEPH HENRY MERRILL, B. S., 

Instructor in Entomology ; Assistant Entomologist. 

B. S., Dartmouth College, 1905 ; on Insect Pest Suppression Work, Massachusetts, 
1905-1908; Graduate Student in Entomology, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909- 
1911; Deputy State Nursery Inspector, Massachusetts, 1910-1911; Instructor in Ento- 
mology, Assistant Entomologist, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office F 55. 

MAURICE COLE TANQUARY,3 Ph. D., 

Instructor in Entomology; Assistant Entomologist. 

A. B., University of Illinois, 1907; Assistant to Illinois State Entomologist, 1907-1909; 
Assistant in Entomology and Zoology, University of Illinois, 1907-1909; A. M., ibid., 1908; 
Assistant in Entomology, ibid., 1909-1912; Graduate Student, Bussey Institution, Harvard 
University, Summer, 1910; Assistant to Minnesota State Entomologist, Summer, 1911; 
Ph.D., University of Illinois^ 1912; Instructor in Entomology and Assistant Entomologist, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

CLAUDE M VESTAL, B. S. A., 
Instructor in Animal Husbandry. 

B. S. A., Purdue University, 1911; Assistant in Agricultural Extension, ibid., 1911- 
1912; Instructor in Animal Husbandry, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office Ag 13; Res. 815 Poyntz Ave. 

ADALINE MAITLAND BAKER, B. L. S., 
Head Cataloguer in Library. 

B. L. S., University of Illinois, 1902 ; Head Cataloguer in Library, Northwestern Uni- 
versity, 1902 - May 1, 1913 ; Head Cataloguer in Library, Kansas State Agricultural Col- 
lege, May 1, 1913 — . 

Office F 27; Res. 909 Fremont St. 

HARLAN DAVID SMITH, B. S., 

Instructor in Charge of Industrial Journalism. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911; Assistant in Industrial Journalism, 
ibid., 1911-1913; Instructor in Charge of Industrial Journalism, ibid., 1913 — . 
Office K 52; Res. 626 Moro St. 

JENNIE ELIZABETH CATON, B. S., 

Instructor in Domestic Science. 

Student, School of Science, Simmons College, 1904-1908; Student, School of Household 
Economics, ibid., 1910-1911; B. S., ibid., 1911; Assistant in Domestic Science, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1911-1913; Instructor in Domestic Science, ibid, 1913 — . 

Office L 35 ; Res. 609 N. Ninth St. 

CARLOTTA MARKS FORD, A. B., 

Instructor in Domestic Science. 

Instructor, Geneva (Illinois) Schools, 1903-1904; Student, Northern Illinois State 
Normal School, Summer, 1904; Instructor, North Aurora (Illinois) School, 1906-1907; 
A. B., University of Illinois, 1911; Assistant in Domestic Science, Kansas State Agricul 
tural College, 1911-1913; Instructor in Domestic Science, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office L 34; Res. 909 Fremont St. 

3. Absent on leave. 



24 Kansas State Agricultural College 

CLARA LOUISE COITH NELSON, B. P., 
Instructor in Drawing. 

B. P., Illinois State Normal University, 1906 ; Supervisor of Drawing, Riverside (Illi- 
nois) Public Schools, 1906-1908; Graduate Student, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York, 
1909-1910; Principal, Greenleaf (Kansas) High School, 1911-1912; Assistant in Drawing, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912-1913; Instructor in Drawing, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office A 6S; Res. 815 Fremont St. 

VIRGINIA LEE MEADE, B. S., 

Instructor in Domestic Science. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909 ; Lecturer and Demonstrator in Domestic 
Science, Chautauqua Assemblies, Summer, 1909; Substitute Assistant in Domestic Scienee, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, Fall Term, 1909; Instnictor in Manual Training, 
Topeka Public Schools, 1910; Graduate Student, Teachers' College, Columbia University, 
Summer, 1910; Instructor in Domestic Science, Topeka High School, 1910-1912; Assistant 
in Domestic Science, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912-1913; Instructor in Domestic 
Science, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office L 35; Res. 810 Pierre St. 

IDA ETHEL RIGNEY, B. S-, 

Instructor in Domestic Science. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909; Dietitian, Ensworth Hospital, St. 
Joseph, Missouri, 1909-1910; Instructor, "Wichita (Kansas) High School, 1910-1912; 
Assistant in Domestic Science, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912-1913; Instructor 
in Domestic Science, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office L 35 ; Res. 1207 Poyntz Ave. 

HALLAM WALKER DAVIS, A. M., 
Instructor in the English Language. 

A. B., University of Indiana, 1909; Principal, Poseyville (Indiana) High School, 1905- 
1907; Superintendent, Port Branch (Indiana) Public Schools, 1909-1913; Graduate Stu- 
dent, Columbia University, Summers, 1910-1913; A.M., ibid., 1913; Instructor in the 
English Language, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office A 53; Res. 1221 Laramie St. 

BERTHA GERICKE, 

Research Assistant in Library. 

Graduate, Hoehere Toechterschule, Berlin, Germany, 1894; Private Pupil in Vocal 
Music, with Prau Dr. Levysohn, Berlin, 1894-1898; Instructor in German, Private 
Schools, "Washington, D. C, 1907-1912: Private Pupil in Library Science, ibid., 1911* 
1912; Assistant in Library, Bureau of Plant Industry, United States Department of Agri- 
culture, May, 1912 - February, 1913; Special Work in Library, ibid., August, 1913; 
Research Assistant in Library, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office F 27; Res. 1415 Fairchild Ave. 

CHARLES WESLEY HOBBS, D. V. S., 
Instructor in Veterinary Medicine. 

D. V. S., Western Veterinary College, Kansas City, Missouri, 1901; Private Practice, 
Kensington, 1901-1904; Private Practice, Smith Center, 1904-1913; Instructor in Vet 
erinary Medicine, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office V 27; Res. 512 Houston St. 

CARL JOHN MERNER, B. P. E., 
Instructor in Physical Education. 

B. P. B., International Young Men's Christian Association College, Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, 1912 ; Student, Iowa State Teachers' College, 1904-1906, 1907 - January 1, 1908, 
1909-1910; Director of Physical Education, Gary (Indiana) Public Schools, 1912-1913; 
Instructor in Physical Education, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office N 37; Res. 907 Osage St. 

ELTA VIRGINIA SAVAGE, A. B., 

Assistant Reference Librarian. 

A.B., University of Missouri, 1911; Assistant Cataloguer and in Charge of Order 
Section, University of Missouri Library, 1911-1912; Certificate, New York State Library 
School, 1913 ; Assistant Reference Librarian, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — - 

Office F 30 ; Res. 203 N. Fourteenth St. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 25 

EUNICE GEORGANNE SELLNER,* 

Instructor in Physical Training for Women. 

Graduate, Sargent's Normal School for Physical Training, 1912; Student, Harvard 
Summer School of Physical Education, Summers, 1910 and 1911; Student in Polk and 
Character Dances, Munich, Germany Summer, 1912; Instructor in Physical Education 
and Athletics for Women, Washburn College, 1912-1913; Instructor in Physical Education 
for Women, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 - February 7, 1914. 

Office N 3 ; Res. 923 Vattier St. 

CONSTANCE MIRIAM SYFORD, A.M., 

Instructor in the English Language. 

A. B., University of Nebraska, 1909 ; Reader and Assistant in English Language and 
Literature, ibid., 1908-1910; Scholar in English Language and Literature, ibid., 1909- 
1910; Fellow in English Language and Literature, ibid., 1910-1911; A.M., ibid., 1911; 
Graduate Student and Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1911-1913; Instructor in 
the English Language, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office G 32; Res. 721 Poyntz Ave. 

PAUL SMITH WELCH, Ph. D., 

Instructor in Entomology; Assistant Entomologist, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station. 

A. B., James Millikin University, 1910; Assistant in Biology, ibid., 1909-1910; As- 
sistant Curator, William Barnes Lepidoptera Collection, 1906-1910; A.M., University of 
Illinois, 1911; Fellow in Zoology ibid., 1911-1913; Instructor in Entomology, University 
of Michigan Biological Station, Summers, 1911, 1912, and 1913; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois, 1913; Instructor in Entomology, and Assistant Entomologist in Agricultural 
Experiment Station, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office F 64; Res. 901 Laramie St. 

BERTRAM WHITTIER WELLS, A. B., 
Instructor in Botany. 

A. B., Ohio State University, 1911 ; Instructor in Biology, Knox College, 1911-1912; 
Graduate Student, University of Chicago, Summer, 1912; Substitute in Charge of Depart- 
ment of Botany, Connecticut Agricultural College, 1912-1913 ; Instructor in Botany, Kan- 
sas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office H 56; Res. 426 Leavenworth St. 

FRED CHARLES WINSHIP, A. M., 

Instructor in the English Language. 

Student, University of Denver, 1898-1902; B. L., Nebraska Wesleyan University, 1904; 
B. O., Ott School of Expression, Chicago, Illinois, 1905; Private Instructor in Elocution, 
Nebraska and Colorado, 1908-1910; A.M., University of Denver, 1910; Instructor in the 
Instructor in the English Language, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office A 53; Res. 929 Colorado St. 

PAGE BLEDSOE, M. S., 

* Instructor in Farm Crops. 

A. B., Washington and Lee University, 1908; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1913; 
Instructor in Farm Crops, Kansas State Agricultural College, September 6, 1913 — . 

Office Ag 79; Res. 714 Poyntz Ave. 

GLENN ARTHUR GILBERT, B. S., 
Instructor in Dairy Husbandry. 

B. S., Michigan Agricultural College, 1909 ; Instructor in Dairying, Dunn County 
(Wisconsin) School of Agriculture, 1909-1911: Instructor in Dairying, Colorado Agricul- 
tural College, 1911-1913; Student, Graduate School of Agriculture, Iowa State College, 
Summer, 1910, and Michigan Agricultural College, Summer, 1912; Instructor in Dairy 
Husbandry, Kansas State Agricultural College, September 20, 1913 — . 

Office D 30: Bes. 915 Bluemont Ave. 

1. Resigned. 



26 Kansas State Agricultural College 

GEORGE ELDON THOMPSON, B. S., 

Field Superintendent of Substations. * 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910; Scientific Assistant, Division of Forage 
Crop Investigations, United States Department of Agriculture, 1910-1911; Superintendent 
of United States Experiment Station, Chillicothe, Texas, 1912 ; District Demonstration 
Agent for Southwest Kansas, 19134 Field Superintendent of Substations, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, October 1, 1913 — . 

Office Ag 60; Res. 609 Leavenworth St. 

ARTHUR ROY FEHN, Ph. B., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Ph. B., Baldwin Wallace College, Berea, Ohio, 1903 ; Instructor in Mathematics, Park 
College Academy, 1904-1905; Assistant in Biology and Botany, Park College, 1905-1906; 
Principal, Argos (Indiana) High School, 1907-1908; Principal, Walnut (Illinois) High 
School, 1908; Assistant Superintendent, ibid., 1909-1910; Graduate Student, University 
of Chicago, Summer and Fall, 1908, and Summers, 1909, 1910, and 1913 ; Assistant in 
Mathematics, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910-1913; Instructor in Mathematics, 
ibid., December 1, 1913 — . 

Office A 70; Res. 821 Humboldt St. 

JOHN GROVER JACKLEY, D. V. M., 

Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Research Assistant in Bacteriological Laboratory of Pennsylvania State Live Stock 
Sanitary Board, Philadelphia, 1908-1909; D. "V. M., University of Pennsylvania, 1910; 
Demonstrator and Instructor in Pathological Histology, ibid., 1910-1911; Assistant in 
Bacteriology, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911-1913; Instructor in Bacteriology, 
ibid., December 1, 1913 — . 

Office V 52; Res. 617 Houston St. 

LOUIS HENRY LIMPER, A. M., 

Instructor in German. 

A. B., Baldwin Wallace College, Berea, Ohio, 1907; Instructor in German, Berea 
(Ohio) High School, 1907-1908; Instructor in English, Robert College, Constantinople, 
1908-1911; Scholar in Modern Languages, Princeton University, 1911-1912; Graduate 
Student, University of Chicago, Summer, 1912 ; Assistant in German and French, Uni- 
versity of Denver, 1912-1913; Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin, Summer, 
1913; Graduate Student and Assistant in German, ibid., 1913 - February 1, 1914; A.M., 
ibid., January, 1914; Instructor in German, Kansas State Agricultural College, Febru- 
ary 1, 1914 — . 

Office N 61; Res. Ill S. Ninth St. 

PERRY JOHN FREEMAN, B. S., 
Instructor in Applied Mechanics. 

B. S. in M. E., University of Illinois, 1907; Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, 
University of Pennsylvania, 1907-1910; Instructor in Machine Construction, and in Charge 
of Mechanical Engineering Department Shop Laboratories, University of Illinois, 1910- 
1912; Foreman and Assistant Manager in the Regulator Department, H. Mueller Manu- 
facturing Company, Decatur, Illinois, 1912 ; Erector of Locomotive Cranes, Browning 
Engineering Company, Cleveland, Ohio, 1912; Mechanical Engineer, Gullett Cotton Gin 
Company, Amite, Lousiana, 1913-1914; Instructor in Mechanics, Kansas State Agricul- 
tural College, February 1, 1914 — . 

Office E 32; Res. 831 Leavenworth St. 

SIEBERT LUKE SIMMERING, M. S., 
Instructor in Steam and Gas Engineering. 

B. S., University of Colorado, 1910 ; Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, ibid.,, 
1910-1912; Graduate Fellow in Mechanical Engineering, University of Illinois, 1912- 
1913; Instructor in Industrial Engineering, Pennsylvania State College, 1913-1914; 
Instructor in Steam and Gas Engineering, Kansas State Agricultural College, March 11. 
1914—. 

Office S 65 ; Res. . 



Fifty -first Annual Catalogue 27 

FORREST FAYE FRAZIER, C. E., 

Instructor in Civil Engineering.® 

Student, Liberal Arts, Miami University, 1905-1907; Student, Engineering Course, Ohio 
State University, 1907-1910; C. E., ibid., 1910; Assistant in Engineering Corps, Cincin- 
nati, Hamilton and Dayton Railway, Summer, 1909 ; Inspector of Concrete Bridges, ibid., 
1910; Assistant Superintendent on Excavation and Fill, with Railroad Contractors, 1910- 
1911; Assistant Engineer on Construction, Pennsylvania Railway, 1911; Assistant in Civil 
Engineering, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911-1914; Instructor in Civil Engineer- 
ing, ibid., 1914 — . 

Office E 32; Res. 718 Vattier St. 

MYRON RALPH BOWERMAN, B. S., 

Instructor in Mechanical Drawing and Machine Design.® 

B. S., Michigan Agricultural College, 1909 ; Draftsman, Western Electric Company, 
Summer, 1909; Assistant in Mechanical Engineering, Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1909-1910; Draftsman, Capital Iron "Works, Topeka, 1910-1911; Draftsman, Phillips, 
Long and Company, Chicago, Illinois, 1911 ; Draftsman, Hanke Iron Works, ibid., 1911- 
1912; Assistant in Mechanical Drawing and Machine Design, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, 1912-1914; Instructor in Mechanical Drawing and Machine Design, ibid., 1914 — . 

Office S 63 ; Res. 1105 Vattier St. 

GRAYSON BELL McNAIR, B. S., 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering.^ 

B. S., Purdue University, 1908; Assistant to Consulting Engineer, Louisville* Ken- 
tucky, 1908-1909; in Charge of Transformer Testing Department, Wagner Electric Manu- 
facturing Company, St. Louis, Missouri, 1909-1913; Assistant in Mathematics, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, May 1 - July 1, 1913 ; Assistant in Electrical Engineering, ibid., 
July 1, 1913-1914; Instructor in Electrical Enginering, ibid., 1914 — . 

Office C 33 ; Res. 1324 Laramie St. 

INA EMMA HOLROYD, B. S., 

Assistant in Mathematics. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1897; Graduate, Kansas State Normal School, 
1899; Graduate Student, Harvard University, Summer School, 1905; Graduate Student, 
Cornell University, Summer School, 1911; Assistant in Mathematics, Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, 1900 — . 

Office G 28; Res. 1001 Moro St. 

CHARLES YOST, 

Assistant in Machine Shop. 

Assistant in Heat and Power Department, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1902- 
1903; Operating Engineer for Lee Electric Light Company, Superior, Nebraska, 1904; 
Assistant in Heat and Power Department, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1905-1910; 
Foreman of Boiler Room, ibid., 1910-1912; Assistant in Machine Shop, ibid., 1912 — . 

Office S 32; Res. 1230 Laramie St. 

JOHN THOMPSON PARKER, 
Assistant in Woodwork. 

Student, Lakin High School, 1897; Graduate, Apprentice Course in Woodwork, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1902; Carpenter, 1902-1904'-; Farmer, 1904-1905; Assistant in 
Woodwork, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1906 — . 

Office S 26; Res. 926 Vattier St. 

HUGH OLIVER, 

Assistant in Heat and Power Distribution. 

Apprentice, Heat and Power Department, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1902- 
1903; Assistant in Heat and Power Department, ibid., 1906-1912; Assistant in Heat, 
Water and Gas Distribution, ibid., 1912-1914; Assistant in Heat and Power Distribution, 
ibid., 1914 — . 

Office S 34; Res. 1126 Kearney St. 

6. Effective September 1, 1914. 



28 Kansas State Agricultural College 

JESSIE ANNABERTA REYNOLDS, A. B., 
Assistant in History and Civics. 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1905; B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1906; 
Graduate Student, University of Kansas, Summers, 1905 and 1906; Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago; Summers, 1907 and 1910; Travel-study in Europe, Summers, 1909 
and 1912; Assistant in History and Civics, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1906 — . 

Office G- 32 ; Ees. 1205 Bluemont Ave. 

CHESTER ALLEN ARTHUR UTT, M. S., 
Assistant in Food Analysis. 

B. S., Cornell College, 1903; Graduate Student, State University of Iowa, 1903-1904; 
Instructor, Keokuk (Iowa) High School, 1904-1907; Graduate Student, State University 
of Iowa, Summer, 1907; M.S., Cornell College, 1909; Graduate Student, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, 1913-1914; Assistant in Food Analysis, ibid., 1907 — ; Assistant 
Chemist, Kansas State Board of Health, 1907 — ; Assistant Chemist, Kansas State Dairy 
Commission, 1907 — . 

Office W 30; Res. 1209 Vattier St. 

CLAUDE CARROLL CUNNINGHAM, B. S., 

Assistant in Cooperative Experiments. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1903; Graduate Student, ibid., 1904; Gradu- 
ate Student, Cornell University, 1906; Special Assistant in Agronomy, Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, 1907-1908; Assistant in Agronomy, Fort Hays Branch Experiment Sta- 
tion, 1908-1911; Assistant in Cooperative Experiments, Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1912 — . 

Office Ag 59 ; Bes. 1018 Laramie St. 

BURTON SYLVESTER ORR,* B. S., 

Assistant in Power and Experimental Engineering; Superintendent of 
Power Plant. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1907 ; in Enginering Department, Swift and 
Company, St. Joseph, Missouri, 1907-1908; Assistant in Mechanical Engineering, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1908-1910; Assistant in Power and Experimental Engineering, 
ibid., 1910 — ; Superintendent of Power Plant, ibid., 1912 - November 1, 1913. 

ELMER JOHNSON,! B. S., 

Assistant in Power and Experimental Engineering. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1908 ; Assistant in Mechanical Engineering, 
ibid., 1908-1910; Assistant in Power and Experimental Engineering, ibid., 1910 -February 
1,. 1914. 

RAYMOND CLIFFORD WILEY, B. S., 

Assistant Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station. 

B. S., Oklahoma College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 1905 ; Assistant Chemist, 
Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, 1905-1908; Assistant Chemist, Agricultural 
Experiment Station, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1908 — . 

Office W 30 ; Res. 711 Humboldt St. 

THOMAS POWELL HASLAM, B. S., 

Assistant in Veterinary Medicine, Agricultural Experiment Station. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1908; Assistant Instructor in Chemistry, Oni- 
versity of Kansas, 1908-1909; M. S., ibid., 1910; Assistant in Veterinary Medicine, Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909 — . 

Office V 2 ; Res. 623 N. Manhattan Ave. 

AMY ALENA ALLEN, B. S., 
Assistant in Printing. 

Apprentice in Department of Printing, Kansas State Agricultural College, Summer, 
1900; Student Assistant, ibid., 1901-1904; B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1904; 
Proof-reader, Department of Printing, ibid., 1904-1909; Assistant in Printing, ibid., 
1909—. 

Office K 28; Res. 1452 Fairchild Ave. 

1. Resigned. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 2& 

JESSIE GULICK, 

Assistant Cataloguer in Library. 

Instructor, Kansas Public Schools, 1899-1901 and 1903-1905; Instructor, Virginia 
Public Schools, 1901-1903; Chief Clerk, Division of College Extension, Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, 1907-1909; Assistant in Library, ibid., 1909-1911; Assistant Cataloguer 
in Library, ibid., 1911 — . 

Office P 28 ; Res. 1622 Osage St. 

ADA MARIE BAUM, 

Assistant in Music. 

Student, Chicago Musical College, 1899 and 1903-1904; Assistant in Music, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1909 — . 
Office M 29 ; Res. 822 Poyntz Ave. 

ETHEL KATE MAY PING, 1 

Assistant in Music: 

Graduate, Sherwood Music School, Chicago, 1909; Assistant in Music, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, 1909 - January 1, 1914. 

JOHN WILLARD CALVIN,* B. S., 

Assistant Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1906; Graduate Student and Student As- 
sistant in Department of Chemistry, ibid., 1906-1908; Assistant Expert in Animal Nutri- 
tion, United States Department of Agriculture, and Assistant in Animal Nutrition, Penn- 
sylvania State College, 1908-1910; Assistant Chemist (Animal Nutrition), Agricultural 
Experiment Station, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910 - February 1, 1914. 

ALANSON LOLA HALLSTED, B. S., 

Assistant in Dry Farming, in Cooperation with United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

B.S.j Kansas State Agricultural College, 1903; -in General Farming and Cooperative 
Work -with Agronomy Department, Kansas State Agricultural Experiment Station, 1904- 
1909; Special Agent, Bureau of Plant Industry, United States Department of Agriculture, 
1909-1910; Assistant in Dry Farming in Cooperation with United States Department of 
Agriculture, Fort Hays Branch Agricultural Experiment Station, 1910 — . 

Office and Bes., Hays, Kansas. 

CLARE LAVON BIDDISON, B. S., 

Assistant in Vocal Music. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1907 ; Graduate Student in Music, ibid., 
1907-1908; Student Assistant in Vocal Music, ibid., 1908-1909; Graduate Student, Cos- 
mopolitan School of Music, Chicago, Summers, 1910 and 1912; Assistant in Vocal Music, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910 — . 

Office M 30; Res. 1001 Humboldt St. 

ELLERY FRANKLIN CHILCOTT,* B. S., 

Superintendent Garden City Branch Agricultural Experiment Station, 
B. S., South Dakota State College, 1906; Assistant in Dry Land Agriculture, United 
States Department of Agriculture, Edgeley (North Dakota), Amarillo (Texas), and Gar- 
den City (Kansas), 1906-1911; Superintendent, Garden City Branch Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, 1911 -March 1, 1914. 

ARTHUR LYNN HARRIS, 

Assistant in Power Plant. 

Fireman, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1908-1909; Student, ibid., 1909-1910; As- 
sistant in Heat and Power, ibid., 1910-1914; Assistant in Power Plant, ibid., 1914 — . 
Office E 27 ; Res. 514 N. Manhattan Ave. 

1. Resigned. 



30 Kansas State Agricultural College 

ALBERT RICHARD LOSH, B. S., 

Assistant State Engineer, Division of College Extension. 

Instructor in Bureau of Education, Philippine Islands, 1904-1907; Student, Philippine 
School of Arts and Trades, 1906; B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910; Graduate 
Student, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1914; Assistant State Engineer, Division 
of College Extension, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910 — . 

Office A 5; Res. 800 Fremont St. 

CHARLES ERNEST MILLAR, M. S., 

Assistant in Soils. 

B. S., University of Illinois, 1909; Assistant in Chemistry, ibid., 1909-1910; Assistant 
Chemist, Illinois State Water Survey, 1910; Assistant in Chemistry, Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, 1910; M.S., University of Illinois, 1911; Assistant Chemist (Soil An- 
alysis), Agricultural Experiment Station, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911 -July 1, 
1913; Assistant in Soils, ibid., July 1, 1913 — . 

Office Ag. 60 ; Res. 1215 Vattier St. 

GEORGE ELLSWORTH RABURN, M. S., 

Assistant in Physics. 

Graduate, Kansas State Normal School, 1905; A. B., University of Michigan, 1907; 
Graduate Student, ibid., 1912-1913 ; M. S., ibid., 1913 ; Assistant in Physics, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1910 — . 

Office C 61 ; Res. 1800 Poyntz Ave. 

FRANK CARL GUTSCHE, B. S., 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

B. S., University of Minnesota, 1910; Night Chemist, Carver County Sugar Company, 
Chaska, Minnesota, Campaign of 1910; Assistant in Chemistry, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, 1911 — . 

Office C 64; Res. 815 Poyntz Ave. 

BRUCE STEINHOFF WILSON, B. S., 

Assistant in Cooperative Experiments. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1908 ; Farm Foreman, Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, 1910-1911; Assistant in Agronomy and Foreman of Experimental Farm, 
ibid., 1911-1912; Assistant in Cooperative Experiments, ibid., 1912 — . 

Office Ag 59 ; Res. 520 N. Manhattan Ave. 

DAVID ERNEST LEWIS, B. S., 

Assistant in Horticulture. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910; Graduate Student, ibid., 1910-1911; 
Assistant in Horticulture, ibid., 1911 — . 

Office H 32; Res. 1020 Osage St. 

BURR HOWEY OZMENT, 
Band Leader. 

Band-master, Baker University, 1900-1903 ; Band-master, University of Missouri, 1904- 
1910; Band Leader, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911 — . 
Office N 54; Res. 913 Laramie St. 

WARREN LALE BLIZZARD, B. S., 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910; Manager of Stock Farm, 1910-1911; 
Assistant in Animal Husbandry, Kansas State Agricultural College, October, 1911 — . 
Office Ag 13 ; Res. 930 Laramie St. 

ASHER EULESTA LANGWORTHY, Ph. C, 

State Feeding-Stuffs Inspector, Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Ph. C, University of Kansas, 1901; in Commercial Work, 1901-1912; State Feeding- 
stuffs Inspector, Agricultural Experiment Station, Kansas State Agricultural College, 
August 15, 1912 — . 

Office Ag 28; Res. 815 Poyntz Ave. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 31 

WALTER GOLDSBERRY ALLEE, B. S., 

Assistant in Physics. 

B. S., Earlham College, 1903; Instructor, Parke County (Indiana) Public Schools, 
1903-1905; Principal of Ward School and Director of Athletics, Rockville (Indiana) City- 
Schools, 1905-1907; Instructor and Director of Athletics, Hammond (Indiana) High 
School, 1908-1911; Graduate Student, University of Chicago, Summers, 1911 and 1912; 
Instructor and Director of Athletics, Sioux City (Iowa) High School, 1911-1912; Assist- 
ant in Physics, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office C 36; Res. 1612 Laramie St. 

LEILA DUNTON, M. S., 

Assistant in Milling Industry. 

B. S., "Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910; M. S., ibid., 1912; Assistant in Milling 
Industry, ibid., 1912 — . 

Office Ag 40 ; Res. 804 Moro St. 

LOUISE FEWELL, 

Assistant in Domestic Art. 

Student, Winthrop Normal and Industrial College, Rock Hill, South Carolina, 1907- 
1911; Student, Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1911-1912; Assistant in Domestic 
Art, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office L 65 ; Res. 1021 Houston St. 

OLIVER MORRIS FRANKLIN, D. V. M., 

Assistant in Veterinary Medicine. 

D.Y. M., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912; Assistant in Veterinary Medicine, 
ibid., 1912 — . 

Office V 2; Res. 1630 Houston St. 

HELEN LOUISE GREEN, 

Assistant in Domestic Science. 

Graduate Student in Household Economics, Simmons College, 1910-1912; Instructor of 
Evening Classes, North Bennett Street Industrial School, Boston, Massachusetts, 1911- 
1912; Graduate Student, Teachers' College, Columbia University, Summer, 1912; Assist- 
ant in Domestic Science, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 
Office L 42; Res. 910 Fremont St. 

CHARLES FRANKLIN HOLLADAY, 

Assistant in Physical Education. 

Graduate, Commercial College, Baker University, 1908; Student, Academic Depart- 
ment, ibid., 1908-1910; Student Assistant in Gymnasium, ibid., 1907-1910; Student, 
Normal School of Physical Training, Battle Creek, Michigan, Summer, 1913 ; Assistant in 
Physical Education, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office N 37; Res. 171 Anderson Ave. 

WALTER JACOB KING, B. S., 

Assistant Engineer, Division of College Extension. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909; Superintendent of Trades School, Kan- 
sas State Industrial Reformatory, Hutchinson, 1909-1912; Fellow in Engineering, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1912-1913; Assistant Engineer, Division of College Extension, 
ibid., 1913 — . 

Office A 5; Res. 1616 Fairchild Ave.- 

ADAH LEWIS,i M. S., 

Lecturer on Home Economics, Division of College Extension. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1907; M. S., ibid., 1909; Temporary Assistant 
in Chemistry, 1907-1911; Dietitian, Ottumwa (Iowa) City Hospital, Fall, 1911; in Charge 
of Girls' Home Economics Clubs, Division of College Extension, Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, 1912-1913 ; Lecturer on Home Economics, Division of College Extension, 
ibid., 1913 -March 1, 1914. 

Office A 35 ; Res. 1018 Laramie St. 

1. Resigned. 



32 Kansas State Agricultural College 

JOHN D LEWIS, B. S., 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

Student, Edinboro (Pennsylvania) State Normal School, 1906; Instructor, Pennsyl- 
vania Public Schools, 1906-1907; B. S., Pennsylvania State College, 1912; Assistant in 
Animal Husbandry, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office Ag 13; Res. 815 Poyntz Ave. 

JAMES WALKER McCOLLOCH, B. S., 

Assistant in Entomology. 

Special Field Agent, Department of Entomology, Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1910-1912; B. S., ibid., 1912; Assistant in Entomology, ibid., 1912—. 

Office F 55; Res. 1201 Bluemont Ave. 

ADOLPH HENRY MEYER,* B. S., 

Assistant in Mathematics. 

B. S., Columbia University, 1911; Assistant in Mathematics, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, 1912 - September 15, 1913. 

WILLIAM HENRY SANDERS, B. S., 
Assistant in Farm Motors. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1890 ; Carpenter, Lake Worth, Florida, 1890- 
1893; Engineer and Contractor, Reclamation Work, Palm Beach, Florida, 1893-1895, 
1900-1902; Marine Steam and Gas Engineer, Lake Worth, Florida, 1895-1900; Foreman 
of Construction Work, West Palm Beach, Florida, 1902-1905; Marine Gas Engineer, Rail- 
way Extension, Miami, Florida, 1905-1906; in Dredging Work and Canal Construction, 
Florida, 1907-1912 ; Assistant in Power and Experimental Engineering, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, 1912-1914; Assistant in Farm Motors, ibid., 1914 — . 

Office E 3; Res. 826 Osage St. 

FLORENCE SNELL, B. S., 

Lecturer on Domestic Science, Division of College Extension. 

Instructor, Kansas Public Schools, 1905-1908; B. S., Kansas State Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1911; Instructor in Domestic Science and Art, Atchison County High School, 1911- 
1912; Lecturer on Domestic Science, Division of College Extension, Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, 1912 — . 

Office A 35; Res. 1018 Laramie St. 

ANNA WALLER WILLIAMS, A. M., 
Assistant in Domestic Science. 

A. B., University of Illinois, 1907; A.M., ibid., 1912; Assistant in Domestic Science, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 — . 

Office L 42; Res. 502 Osage St. 

WILLIAM ARMFIELD BOYS, B. S., 

District Demonstration Agent, West Central Kansas, Division of Col- 
lege Extension. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1904; Farmer, Lee's Summit, Missouri, 1904- 
1906; Farmer, Goodland, Kansas, 1906-1911; Assistant Cerealist, University of Cali- 
fornia, 1911-1912; District Demonstration Agent, West Central Kansas, Division of Col- 
lege Extension, Kansas State Agricultural College, October, 1912 — . 

HARLEY JAMES BOWER,* B. S., A. M., 

District Demonstration Agent, Southeastern Kansas, Division of Col- 
lege Extension. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910; Graduate Student and Assistant in 
Soils, Ohio State University, 1910-1912; A.M., ibid., 1912; Agronomist, Connecticut Ex- 
periment Station, 1912-1913; District Demonstration Agent, Southeastern Kansas, Division 
of College Extension, Kansas State Agricultural College, February, 1913 — . 

1. Resigned. 

4. In cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 33 

GEORGE SELICK KNAPP, 

Assistant in Steam and Gas Engineering. 

Assistant in Machine Shops, Highland Park College, 1908-1910; Instructor in Steam 
and Gas Engines, ibid., 1910-1913; Assistant in Gas Engineering, Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, February 15, 1913-1914; Assistant in Steam and Gas Engineering, ibid., 
1914—. 

Office E 3; Res. 815 Poyntz Ave. 

ROLLA WOODS MILLER, A. B., 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

A. B., Wabash College, 1913; Assistant in Chemistry, ibid., 1911-1913; Assistant in 
Chemistry, Kansas State Agricultural College, February 25, 1913 — . 

Office W 26; Res. 815 Poyntz Ave, 

OLIVER CARLTON MILLER, 
Deputy Feeding-Stuffs Inspector. 

With Operating and Auditing Departments, Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad 
Company, 1892-1913 ; Deputy Feeding-stuffs Inspector, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, June 1, 1913 — . 

Office Ag 28; Res. 407 Leavenworth St. 

KARL BRYANT MUSSER,* B. S., 
Deputy State Dairy Commissioner. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 ; Deputy State Dairy Commissioner, 
June 10 - September 10, 1913. 

ROBERT KLINE BONNETT, B. S., 

Assistant in Farm Crops. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913; Assistant in Farm Crops, ibid., July 1. 
1913—. 

Office Ag 77 ; Res. 1001 Moro St. 

FREDERICK ALFRED WIRT, B. S., 
Assistant in Farm Mechanics. 

B. S., University of Nebraska, 1913 ; Student Assistant in Applied Mechanics, ibid., 
1912-1913; Assistant in Farm Mechanics, Kansas State Agricultural College, July 1, 
1913—. 

Office R 27; Res. 815 Poyntz Ave. 

JAMES PLUMMER POOLE, B. S., 

Assistant in Botany. 

B. S., University of Maine, 1912; Instructor in Botany, Washburn College, 1912-1913; 
Assistant in Botany, Kansas State Agricultural College, August 1, 1913 — . 
Office H 51; Res. 109 N. Ninth St. 

FRED SAWYER MERRILL, B. S., 

Assistant in Horticulture. 

B. S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912 ; Assistant in Horticulture, Extension 
Department, ibid., 1911-1912 ; Assistant to State Entomologist, Kansas State Entomological 
Commission, 1912-1913; Horticulturalist, Division of College Extension, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, March 1 - May 15, 1913 ; Assistant in Horticulture, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office H 32; Res. 913 Osage St. 

ELSIE ADAMS, B. S., 
Assistant in Library. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913; Assistant in Library, ibid., 1913 — . 
Office F 32; Res. 1527 Leavenworth St. • 

1. Resigned. 
—2 



34 Kansas State Agricultural College 

EDITH ALLEN, A. B., 

Lecturer on Home Economics, Division of College Extension. 

A, B., University of Illinois, 1913 ; Institute Lecturer for Illinois Farmers' Institutes, 
1907-1913; Graduate Student, University of Illinois, 1913; Lecturer on Home Economics, 
Division of College Extension, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office A 35; Res. Park Place. 

GRACE CUSHING AVERILL, 

Assistant in Drawing. 

Graduate, Wisconsin State Normal School, 1906; Graduate Student of Manual Arts, 
ibid., 1909-1910; Graduate Student and Student Assistant in Mechanical Drawing, Bradley- 
Polytechnic Institute, Peoria, Illinois, 1910-1912; Instructor in Manual Arts, Anaheim 
(California) Public Schools, 1912-1913; Assistant in Drawing, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, 1913 — . 

Office A 80; Res. 203 N. Fourteenth St. 

EDNA MAY BAIRD, 

Assistant in Music. 

Student, Bethany College, Lindsborg, Kansas, 1911-1912; Student, Moody Institute, 
Chicago, Illinois, 1912; Graduate, American Conservatory of Music, Chicago, 1913; As- 
sistant in Music, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office M 53; Res. 1021 Houston St. 

WILLIAM HENRY BALL, 

Assistant in Woodwork. 

Student, Salt City Business College, Winters, 1904-1906; Apprentice Carpenter, 1902- 
1907; with Gauze and Minor, HavHand, Kansas, 1907-1909; with H. N. Duckworth, 
Pratt, Kansas, 1909-1911; Instructor in Manual Training, Pratt High School, 1911-1913; 
Assistant in Woodwork, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office S 26; Res. 1006 Bluemont St. 

HAROLD ROSS BRAKEMAN, 
Assistant in Woodwork. 

Student, Northwestern State Normal School, Edinboro, Pennsylvania, 1906-1908; 
Carpenter Apprentice, Franklin, Pennsylvania, 1908-1910; Assistant Foreman of Con- 
struction, Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railway, 1910-1911; Building Contractor, 
1911-1912; Manager, Longbeach (Mississippi) Sawmill Company, 1912-1913; Assistant 
in Woodwork, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office S 26 ; Res. 1201 Bluemont Ave. 

BERTHA EDITH BUXTON, B. S., 

Assistant in Domestic Art. 

B. S., Ohio State University, 1913 ; Student Assistant in Domestic Science and Art, 
ibid., 1912-1913 ; Assistant in Domestic Art, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office L 64 ; Res. 414 N. Juliette Ave. 

ROBERT VERNON CHRISTIAN, D. V. M., 

Superintendent of Serum Production. 

D. V. M., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911; Assistant in Serum Work, ibid., 
1911-1912; Superintendent of Serum Production, ibid., 1913 — . 
Office V 27; Res. 617 Houston St. 

JENNIE LYNN COX, B. S., . 
Assistant in Domestic Science. 

A. B.,- Fairmount College, 1903 ; Graduate Student, University of Chicago, Summer, 
1903; Instructor, Fairmount College, 1903-1911; B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1913; Assistant in Domestic Science, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office L 42 ; Res. 724 Houston St. 

MAYMIE DAVIS, B. S., 
. Assistant in Domestic Science. 

B. S., Ohio State University, 1913 ; Assistant in Domestic Science, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office L 42; Res. 723 Houston St. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 35 

HARRY ELKINS DODGE, B. S., 

Assistant in Dairying, Fort Hays Branch Agricultural Experiment 

Station. 
B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 ; Assistant in Dairying, Fort Hays 
Branch Agricultural Experiment Station, 1913 — . 
Office and Res. Hays, Kansas. 

EMMA FLORA FECHT, 

Assistant in Domestic Art. 

Student, Kansas State Manual Training Normal School, Summers, 1905-1907 ; Student, 
Stout Institute, Summers, 1908-1910; Graduate, Bradley Polytechnic Institute, 1912; 
Assistant in Domestic Art, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office L 65 ; Res. 1415 Fan-child Ave. 

CLEMENS INKS FELPS, B. S., 

Assistant in Highway Engineering, Division of College Extension. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 ; Assistant in Highway Engineering, 
Division of College Extension, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office A 5 ; Res. 1006 Fremont St. 

GRACE AGNES FERREE, B. S., 

Assistant in Domestic Art. 

B. S., Ohio State University, 1911; Assistant in Domestic Art, ibid., 1911-1912; As- 
sistant in Domestic Art, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 
Office L 65 ; Res. 723 Houston St. 

RAY GATEWOOD, B. S., 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1913 ; Assistant in Animal Husbandry, Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, 1913 — . 

Office Ag 13 ; Res. 714 Poyntz Ave. 

ROBERT GETTY, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Forage Crops* Fort Hays Branch Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 
B. S. A., University of Nebraska, 1913 ; Assistant in Forage Crops, Fort Hays Branch 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 1913 — . 
Office and Res., Hays, Kansas. 

GRACE GLASGOW, M. S., 

Assistant in Bacteriology. 

B. S., University of Illinois, 1912; M.S., ibid., 1912; G-raduate Student, ibid., 1912- 
1913; Assistant in Bacteriology, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 
Office V 54; Res. 203 Park Road. 

EDITH ELIZABETH HAGUE, A. B., 

Assistant in Library. 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1910; Graduate Student, Illinois Library School, 1912- 
1913; Assistant in Library, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office F 28; Res. 515 Laramie St. 

MELVA DELIA HARKER, B. S., 

Assistant in Domestic Science. 

B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1913; Assistant in Domestic Science, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office L 42 ; Res. Humboldt St. 

4. In cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. 



36 Kansas State Agricultural College 

ERWIN WILLIAM HENRYS 
Assistant in Blacksmithing. 

Apprentice to General Blacksmith, 1908-1913; Blacksmith, Blue Rapids Machine Shop, 
1913; Assistant in Blacksmithing, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 
Office S 38; Res. 1414 Houston St. 

ARAMINTA HOLMAN, 

Assistant in Drawing \ 

Graduate, Kansas State Normal School, 1890; Instructor, Leavenworth Public Schools, 
1891-1904; Principal, ibid., 1904-1909; Art Instructor, Leavenworth County Institute, 
1901, 1904; Graduate, New York School of Fine and Applied Art, 1910; Instructor, ibid., 
1910-1911; Instructor in Art, Kansas State Normal School, Summer, 1910, and Spring 
Term, 1913 ; Instructor in Art, State-Wide Institute, ibid., 1913 ; Assistant in Drawing, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office A 67 ; Res. 1005 Humboldt St. 

GARNET LEONE HUTTO, 

Assistant in Physical Education for Women. 

Student, Harvard Summer School, 1913; Assistant in Physical Training for Women, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 
Office N 3; Res. 923 Vattier St. 

ETHEL HANNAH JONES, B. S., 

Assistant in Domestic Art. 

Student, Smith College, 1906-1908; Graduate, Pratt Institute, 1910; Instructor, Scran- 
ton (Pennsylvania) Evening Technical High School, 1911-1912; B. S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1913; Graduate, Teachers' College, ibid., 1913; Assistant in Domestic Art, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office L 64; Res. 1415 Pairchild Ave. 

FREDERIC ARTHUR KIENE, B. S., 

Assistant in Cereal Crops* Fort Bays Branch Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1906; Newspaper Work and General Farm- 
ing, 1906-1912; Assistant in Cereal Crops, Fort Hays Branch Agricultural Experiment 
Station, 1912 — . 

Office and Res., Hays, Kansas. 

JOSEPH IRL KIRKPATRICK, D. V. M., 

Assistant in Hog-Cholera Serum Production. 

D. V. M., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 ; Instructor, Sedgwick County 
Schools, 1908-1909, 1911-1912; Assistant in Hog-cholera Serum Production, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office V 30; Res. . 

WILLIAM ALBERT LATHROP, 

Assistant in Blacksmithing. 

Student of Mechanical Engineering, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910-1913; 
Assistant in Blacksmithing, ibid., 1913 — . 
Office S 38 ; Res. 601 Vattier St. 

ERWIN JONES MONTAGUE, B. S., 

Assistant to Superintendent, Fort Hays Branch Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 

B. S., Oregon Agricultural College, 1913 ; Assistant to Superintendent, Fort Hays 
Branch Agricultural Experiment Station, 1913 — . 
Office and Res. Hays, Kansas. 

4. In cooperation with the United States Department of xlgriculture. 

5. Temporary appointment. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 37 

FRED WTNFIELD MOSSMAN, 

Assistant in Power Plant 

Foreman of Boiler Boom, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911-1913; Assistant in 
Heat and Power, ibid., 1913-1914; Assistant in Power Plant, ibid., 1914 — . 
Office E 3; Res. 519 N. Manhattan Ave. 

RAY V MURPHY, B. S., 

Assistant in Chemistry, 

B. S., Illinois Wesleyan University, 1912 ; Undergraduate Instructor in Chemistry, 
ibid., 1910-1911; Soil, Water and Fertilizer Analyst, ibid., 1910-1912; Instructor in 
Science, Genesee (Illinois) Collegiate Institute, Summer, 1912; Instructor in Science, 
Genoa (Illinois) High School, 1912 - February, 1913; Principal, Marengo (Illinois) High 
School, February to June, 1913 ; Assistant in Chemistry, Kansas State Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1913—. 

Office W 26; Res. 520 Poyntz Ave. 

FRED FARWELL PIPER, B. S., 
Assistant in Physics. 

B. S., Tufts College, 1908; Professor of Physics and Engineering, St. Francis Xavier's 
College, Antigonish Nova Scotia, 1908-1909; Student Engineer, General Electric Com- 
pany, 1909-1913 ; Assistant in Physics, Kansas State Agricultural College, .1913 — . 

Office C 39; Res. 811 Poyntz Ave. 

ALICE EDNA SKINNER, B. S., 

Assistant in Domestic Science. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909 ; Assistant in Home Ee@nom.ies, Depart- 
ment of College Extension, ibid., 1910-1911; Instructor in Domestic Science, Fairbury 
(Nebraska) High School, 1911-1912; Graduate Student, Teachers' College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1912-1913; Assistant in Domestic Scienee, Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1913—. 

Office L 44; Res. 1203 Laramie St. 

JOHN CLIFFORD SUMMERS, B. S., 

Assistant Chemist, Agricultural. Experiment Station. 

B. S., Clemson Agricultural College, Clemson College, South Carolina, 1906 ; Assistant 
Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station, Louisiana State University, 1906-1909; Gradu- 
ate Student, ibid., 1908-1909; Assistant Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Purdue University, 1909-1910; Assistant Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station, Cob' 
rado Agricultural College, 1910-1911; Chief Chemist, the Hally Sugar Company, Denver, 
Colorado, 1911-1913 ; Assistant Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station, Texas College 
of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, February to September, 1913; Assistant Chemist, 
Agricultural Experiment Station, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office C 3; Res. 1630 Leavenworth St. 

PEARLE EBERDINE THOMAS, B. S., 

Assistant in Domestic Art. 

B. S., University of Missouri, 1911; Student Assistant in Botany, ibid., 1909-1911; 
Graduate Student, ibid., 1911-1912; Instructor, St. Joseph (Missouri) Central High 
School, 1912-1913; Assistant in Domestic Art, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office L 64; Res. 1001 Humboldt St. 

WALTER EDWIN TOMSON, B. S., 
Assistant in Dairy Husbandry. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 ; with Department of Dairy Hus- 
bandry, ibid., 1912-1913; Assistant in Dairy Husbandry, ibid., 1913 — . 
Office D 30; Res. 904 Bluemont Ave. 

WALTER AMOS TURNBULL, 

Assistant in Blacksmithing. 

Apprentice to General Blacksmith, 1897-1901; General Blacksmith, 1903-1906; Jour- 
neyman Blacksmith, Denver Electric and Gas Company, 1908-1909; Blacksmith with 
Denver and Rio Grande Railway Company, 1909-1910; Foreman of Blacksmith Shop, 
Telluride (Colorado) Transfer Company, 1910-1911; Tool Temperer, Liberty Bell Mining 
Company, Colorado, 1911-1912; General Blacksmith, 1912-1913; Assistant in Black- 
smithing, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office S 38; Res. 916 Pierre St. 



38 Kansas State Agricultural College 

CAROLINE ULRICH, 

Assistant in Domestic Art. 

Graduate, Normal Domestic Art Course, Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
1912; Instructor of Evening Classes, Saginaw (Michigan) Manual Training School, 1912- 
1913; Assistant in Domestic Art, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office Ij 64; Res. 910 Fremont St. 

CHESTER LEE WOODINGTON, 

Assistant in Power Plant. 

With Heat and Light Department, School for the Deaf, Olathe, 1903-1905; with Re- 
frigeration Department, Armour Packing Company, Kansas City, 1905-1910; Steam Fitter 
with Department of Heat and Power, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910-1913; 
Assistant in Heat and Power, ibid., 1913-1914; Assistant in Power Plant, ibid., 1914 — . 

Office E 3; Res. 1126 Moro St. 

HARRY BARCLAY YOCOM, A. B., 

Assistant in Zoology. 

A. B., Oberlin College, 1912 ; Instructor in Zoology, Wabash College, 1912-1913 ; Stu- 
dent, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, Summer, 1913 ; Assistant 
m Zoology, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office F 62 ; Res. 714 Poyntz Ave. 

LEE HAM GOULD, B. S., 

District Demonstration Agent, Southwest Kansas, Division of College 
Extension. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912; Farm Manager and Grain Buyer for 
W. H. Gould and Sons, 1912-1913; District Demonstration Agent, Southwest Kansas, 
Division of College Extension, Kansas State Agricultural College, October 1, 1913 — . 

Office and Res. Dodge City, Kansas. 

LEO EDWARD MELCHERS, M. S., 

Assistant Plant Pathologist, Agricultural Experiment Station. 

B. S., Ohio State University, 1912; Student Assistant in Horticultural Extension 
Schools, ibid., 1911-1912; M.S., ibid., 1913; Assistant Plant Pathologist, Agricultural 
Experiment Station, Kansas State Agricultural College, October 1, 1913 — . 

Office H 56; Res. 900 Leavenworth St. 

ANDREW MINIE PATERSON, B. S., 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 ; Graduate, School of Agriculture, Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1910; Assistant in Animal Husbandry, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, October 1, 1913 — . 

Office Ag 13 ; Res. 121 N. Eighth St. 

STANLEY ALBERT SMITH, B. S., 

Assistant in Drawing. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 ; Assistant in Drawing, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, October 1, 1913 — . 
Office A 55; Res. 611 Poyntz Ave. 

EDITH ELLEN JONES, B. S., 

Assistant to the Dean of the Division of Agriculture. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909 ; Secretary to Department of Agronomy, 
ibid., 1909 - October 15, 1913 ; Assistant to the Dean of the Division of Agriculture, 
ibid., October 15, 1913 — . 

Office Ag 31; Res. 1224 Fremont St. 

LEWELLYN GAINES HEPWORTH, B. S., 
'Deputy Feeding-Stuffs Inspector. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1897; Deputy Feeding-stuffs Inspector, Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, ibid., October 27, 1913 — . 
Res. 1420 Buchanan St., Topeka, Kansas. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 39 



FRANK BAXTER LAWTON,* B. S., 

Assistant in Farm Mechanics. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912; Farm Foreman, ibid., 1912-1913; A»- 
sistant in Farm Mechanics, ibid., November 1, 1913 - March 1, 1914. 

HAROLD MORTON JONES, B. S., 

Deputy State Dairy Commissioner. 

B. S., Purdue University, 1908; Manager of Indiana Creameries, 1908-1913; Deputy 
State Dairy Commissioner, November, 1913 — . 
Office X; Res. 512 Houston St, 

WILLIAM GRISWOLD BEACH, A. B., 

Assistant in Public Speaking. 

A. B., Harvard University, 1911; Instructor, Manter Hall, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
1909-1910; Private Teaching and Settlement Work, 1911-1913; Concert and Lyceum 
Work with International Musical Bureau, New York City, 1911-1913 ; Assistant in Public 
Speaking, Kansas State Agricultural College, January 1, 1914 — . 

Office F 3 ; Bes. 1031 Bluemont Ave. 

VINTON VIRGIL DETWILER, B. S., 

Assistant in Industrial Journalism. 

Instructor in Manual Training, Dickinson County High School, 1911-1912; B. S., 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913; Assistant in Industrial Journalism, ibid., 
January 1, 1914 — . 

Office K 51 ; Res. 613 N". Manhattan Ave. 

RALPH KENNEY, B. S. A., 
Assistant in Farm Crops. 

B. S. A., Ohio State University, 1912 ; Assistant in Agronomy, Kentucky State College 
of Agriculture, and Experiment Station, 1912 - December 31, 1913 ; Assistant in Farm 
Crops, Kansas State Agricultural College, January 1, 1914= — . 

Office Ag 82; Bes. 617 Houston St. 

FANCHON IDOLINE EASTER, 

Assistant in Music. 

Pupil of Raphael Navos, 1909-1913; Diploma, Institute of Musical Art, Wichita, 1911; 
Instructor in Piano, Institute of Musical Art, Wellington, 1912-1913; Concert Artiit and 
Instructor in Music, 1913 ; Assistant in Music, Kansas State Agricultural College, Janu- 
ary 20, 1914 — . 

Office M 52; Res. 611 Humboldt St. 

RUFUS TERRY KENNEDY, D.V.M., 

Assistant in Veterinary Medicine. 

D. V. M., Ohio State University, 1911; Assistant in Laboratories and Assistant 
Bacteriologist, Ohio State Board of Health, July, 1911 - January, 1913 ; Private Veterinary 
Practice, Bucyrus, Ohio, July, 1912 - February 1, 1914; Assistant in "Veterinary Medi- 
cine, Kansas State Agricultural College, February 1, 1914 — . 

Office. V — ; Res. — . 

LEWIS LEROY LEEPER, 

Miller, Department of Milling Industry. 

Assistant Miller, Kaw Mills, Topeka, 1907 and 1908 ; Head Miller, Dwight Mills, G-race- 
ville, Minnesota, 1909; Head Miller, Cozad Roller Mills, Cozad, Nebraska, 1910 and 1911; 
Head Miller and Superintendent, Denton Milling Company, Denton, Texas, 1912; Head 
Miller and Superintendent, Royal Milling Company, Milliken, Colorado, 1913; Miller, 
Department of Milling Industry, Kansas State Agricultural College, February 23, 1914 — . 

STANLEY PENRHYN CLARK, B. S., 

Superintendent, Colby Branch Agricultural Experiment Station. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912; Instructor, Nashwauk (Minnesota) 
High School, 1912 - March 1, 1914 ; Superintendent, Colby Branch Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, March l, 1914 — . 

Office and Res., Colby, Kansas. 

1. Resigned. 



40 Kansas State Agricultural College 

MALCOLM SEWELL, M. S., 

Superintendent, Garden City Branch Agricultural Experiment Station. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 ; M. S., Ohio State University, January 
1, 1914; Superintendent, Garden City Branch Agricultural Experiment Station, March 
1, 1914—. 

Office and Res., Garden City, Kansas. 

PRESTON ESSEX McNALL, B. S., 
Fellow in Soils. 

B. S. in E. E., Kansas State Agrieultural College, 1909 ; with Pacific Electric Company 
and Edison Electric Company, Los Angeles, California, 1909-1911 ; Instructor, Minneapolis 
High School, 1911-1912 ; B. S. in Ag., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 ; Fellow in 
Soils, ibid., 1913 — . 

Office Ag 60 ; Res. T. M. C. A. 

EDWIN HENRY HUNGERFORD, B. S., 
Fellow in Chemistry. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912; Graduate Student, ibid., 1912-1913; 
Fellow in Chemistry, ibid., 1913 — . 
Office C 3 ; Res. 518 Bluemont Ave. 

LYMAN DALTON LaTOURETTE, B. S., 
Fellow in Farm Crops. 

B. S. A., University of Arizona, 1913 ; Fellow in Farm Crops, Kansas State Agricultural 
College, 1913 — . 

Office Ag 79; Res. 710 N. Manhattan Ave. 

FLOYD PATTISON, 

Fellow in Steam and Gas Engineering. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1912 ; Employee of Smith Gas Power Com- 
pany, Lexington, Ohio, 1912-1913; Fellow in Steam and Gas Engineering, Kansas State 
Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office E 31; Res. 927 Leavenworth St. 

JOHN BEARDSLEY SIEGLINGER, B. S., 

Fellow in Soils. 

B. S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1913 ; Fellow in Soils, Kansas 
State Agrieultural College, 1913 — . 

Office Ag 61 ; Res. 904 Bluemont Ave. 



JAMES THOMAS LARDNER, 

Financial Secretary and Purchasing Agent. 

Student, Kansas Normal College, Fort Scott, 1891-1893; Instructor, Kansas Public 
Schools, 1893-1896; Student, Kansas State Normal School, 1896-18©7; Bookkeeper, Assist- 
ant Bank Cashier, and Bank Cashier, 1898-1913 ; Financial Secretary and Purchasing 
Agent, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 

Office A 27; Res. 608 Osage St. 

jessie Mcdowell machir, 

Registrar. 

Assistant Registrar, University of Kansas, August, 1910-1913; Registrar, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, 1913 — . 
Office A 29; Res. 1224 Fremont St. 

BERZELIUS LESLIE STROTHER, 

Superintendent of Printing. 

Master Printer, Raleigh, North Carolina, 1876-1877; Printer and Publisher, 1877- 
1912; Superintendent of Printing, Kansas State Agricultural College, July 15, 1913- — . 
Office K 28; Res. 1214 Bluemont Ave. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 41 

ROSCOE TOWNLEY NICHOLS, B. S., M. D., 

College Physician. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1899: M. D., Northwestern University 
Medical School, 1902; Private Practice of Medicine. Liberal, Kansas, 1902 - February 1, 
1914; College Physician, Kansas State Agricultural College, February 1, 1914 — . 

Office A 65: Res. 1025 Humboldt St. 

ROSE THOMPSON, R. N., 
College Nurse. 

Graduate, Parkview Hospital Training School, Manhattan, June, 1913; R. N., State 
of Kansas, June, 1913; Hospital and Private Nursing, June, 1913 - January 20, 1914; 
College Nurse, Kansas State Agricultural College, January 20. 1914 — . 

Office A 65; Res. 1307 Poyntz Ave. 

WILLIAM BILE Y LEWIS,i 

Custodian. 

Head Janitor, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1899-1908; Custodian, ibid., 1908- 
January 15, 1914. 

GEORGE FRANKLIN WAGNER, B. S., 

Custodian. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1899; Custodian, ibid., January 15, 1914 — . 
Office A 47; Res. College Campus. 

GUY DAVID NOEL, B. S., 

Foreman in Charge, Dodge City Branch Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909; Assistant, South Dakota Agricultural 
Experiment Station, 1909; Instructor, Olathe High Sahool, 1909-1910; Instructor in 
Science, Dickinson County High School, 1910 - April, 1911 ; Foreman in Charge, Dodge 
City Branch Agricultural Experiment Station, April 1, 1911 — . 

Office and Res., Dodge City, Kansas. 

FRANCIS JOHN TURNER, 
• Foreman, Ogallah Branch Agricultural Experiment Station. 

With Dillon Nursery Company, McLouth, Kansas, 1902-1904; Farmer and Fruit 
Grower, 1904-1908; Student, Kansas 'State Agricultural College, 1908-1909; Foreman, 
Ogallah Branch Agricultural Experiment Station, 1909 — . 

Office and Res., Ogallah, Kansas. 

CHARLES ELMER CASSEL, B. S., 

Foreman, Tribune Branch Agricultural Experiment Station. 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1910 ; Foreman, Tribune Branch Agricultural 
Experiment Station, 1912 — . 

Office and Res., Tribune Kansas. 

GEORGE RICHARD PAULING, 

Engineer of Power Plant. 

Oiler in Power Plant, Metropolitan Street Railway, Kansas City, Missouri, 1900-1901;' 
Switchboard Operator, ibid., 1901-1903; Construction Work, General Electric Company, 
1903-1904; Student in Night School, Finley Engineering College, 1905-1906; Assistant 
Engineer of Power Plant, Metropolitan Street Railway, Kansas City Missouri, 1904-1908; 
Night Engineer, Missouri River Power Plant, ibid., 1908-1911; Chief Engineer, ibid., 
1911-1913; Engineer of > Power Plant, Kansas State Agricultural College, November 1, 
1913—-. 

Office E 3 ; Res. 625 Leavenworth St. 

EDWARD CLAEREN, Commissary Sergeant U. S. A. (Retired), 

Assistant to the Commandant. 

Commissary Sergeant, U. S. A. (Retired) ; Assistant to the Commandant, Kansas Statf 
Agricultural College, 1910 — . 

Office N 29; Res. 1125 Poyntz Ave. 

1. Resigned. 



42 Kansas State Agricultural College 

WALDO ERNEST GRIMES, B. S., 
Farm Foreman. 

B. S-, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913; Farm Foreman, ibid., 1913 — . 
Office and Res., R. R. 8. 

CYRUS EARL BUCHANAN, 
Dairy Herdsman. 

NORTON LEWIS HARRIS, 
Superintendent of Poultry. 

LESLIE ROSS, 
Herdsman. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 



Agricultural Experiment Station 



Officers of the Station 

H. J. WATERS, President of the College. 
ADMINISTRATION— 

W. M Jardine, Director. 

J. T. Willard, Vice Director. 

G. E. Thompson, General Superintendent of Substations. 

J. T. Lardner, Financial Secretary. 

E. E. Jones, Executive Clerk. 

AGRONOMY— 

L. E. Call, in Charge. 

Cecil Salmon, Assistant in Crops. 

C. C. Cunningham, Assistant in Cooperative Experiments. 

B. S. Wilson, Assistant in Cooperative Experiments. 
R. I. Throckmorton, Assistant in Soils. 

C. E. Millar, Assistant in Soils. 
R. K. Bonnett, Assistant in Crops. 
Ralph Kenney, Assistant in Crops. 
W. E. Grimes, Farm Superintendent. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY— 

W. A. Cochel, in Charge. 

C. W. McCampbell, Assistant in Horse-Feeding Investigations* 

C. M Vestal, Assistant in Animal Nutrition. 

J. D. Lewis, Assistant in Beef Cattle. 

W. L. Blizzard, Assistant in Hogs. 

Ray Gatewood, Assistant in Beef Cattle. 

Leslie Ross, Herdsman. 

BACTERIOLOGY— 

L. D. Bushnell, in Charge. 

0. W. Hunter, Assistant in Dairy Bacteriology. 

J. G. Jackley, Assistant in Poultry Disease Investigations. 

Grace Glasgow, Assistant in General Bacteriology. 

BOTANY— 

H. F. Roberts, in Charge. 
E. C. Miller, Assistant in Plant Physiology. 
J. P. Poole, Assistant in Seed Control and Plant Breeding. 
. L. E. Melchers, Assistant in Plant Pathology. 

CHEMISTRY— 

J. T. Willard, in Charge. 

C. 0. Swanson, Assistant in General Investigations. 

R. C. Wiley, Assistant in Feeding Stuffs and Fertilizers. 

J. W. Calvin,* Assistant in Animal Nutrition. 

J. C. Summers, Assistant in Soil Analysis. 

* Resigned February 1, 1914. 



44 Kansas State Agricultural College 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY— 

0. E. Reed, in Charge. 

J. B. Fitch, Assistant in Dairy Production. 

W. E. Tomson, Assistant in Dairy Manufactures. 

G. A. Gilbert, Assistant in Dairy Manufactures. 

G. S. Hine, State Dairy Commissioner. 

H. M. Jones, Deputy State Dairy Commissioner. 

C, E. Buchanan, Herdsman. 

ENTOMOLOGY— 

G. A. Dean, in Charge. 

J. H. Merrill, Assistant in Fruit Insect Investigations. 

P. S. Welch, Assistant in Staple Crop Insect Investigations. 

J. W. McColloch, Assistant in Staple Crop Insect Investigations. 

FORESTRY— 

C. A. Scott, in Charge. 

horticulture- 
Albert Dickens, in Charge. 
M. F. Ahearn, Assistant in Vegetables and Forcing Crops. 

D. E. Lewis, Assistant in Diseases of Fruits and Vegetables. 

F. S. Merrill, Assistant in Cultural Methods and Fertilizer Investi- 
gations. 

MILLING INDUSTRY— 

L. A. Fitz, in Charge. 

A. E. Langworthy, Assistant in Feed Control. 

Leila Dunton, Assistant in Wheat and Flour Investigations. 

0. C. Miller, Assistant in Feed Control. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY— 

W. A. Lippincott, in Charge. 

N. L. Harris, Superintendent of Poultry Plant. 

VETERINARY MEDICINE— 

F. S. Schoenleber, in Charge. 

L. W. Goss, Assistant in Histology and Pathology. 

T. P. Haslam, Assistant in Pathology. 

R. V. Christian, Assistant in Hog Cholera Serum Manufacture. 

0. M. Franklin, Assistant in Veterinary Medicine. 

J. I. Kirkpatrick, Assistant in Hog Cholera Serum Manufacture. 

C. W. Hobbs, Field Veterinarian. 

ZOOLOGY— 

R. K. Nabours, in Charge. 

J. E. Ackert, Assistant in Parasitology. 

H. B. Yocum, Assistant in Injurious Mammals Investigations. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 45 



Port Hays Branch Station 

George K. Helder, Superintendent. 

A. L. Hallsted, 4 Assistant in Dry Farming. 

F. A. Kiene, 4 Assistant in Cereal Investigations. 

Robert E. Getty, 4 Assistant in Forage Crop Investigations. 



Garden City Branch Station 

M. C. Sewell, Superintendent. 

J. G. Lill, 4 Assistant in Dry Farming. 

4 Assistant in Irrigation Investigations. 



Dodge City Forestry Station 

F. J. Turner, Foreman. 



Tribune Branch Station 

C. E. Cassel, Foreman. 



Colby Branch Station 

-, Foreman. 



4. In cooperation with tke United States Department of Agriculture. 



46 Kansas State Agricultural College 



Engineering Experiment Station 



Officers of the Station 

H. J. WATERS, President of the College. 
ADMINISTRATION— 

A. A. Potter, Acting Director. 
Fanny Dale, Secretary. 

APPLIED MECHANICS AND MACHINE DESIGN— 

R. A. Seaton, in Charge. 
P. J. Freeman, Assistant. 
M. R. Bowerman, Assistant. 

ARCHITECTURE— 

J. D. Walters, in Charge. 
F. C. Harris, Assistant. 

CHEMISTRY— 

J. T. Willard, in Charge. 
H. H. King, Assistant. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING— 

L. E. Conrad, in Charge. 

F. F. Frazier, Assistant. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING— 

J. 0. Hamilton, in Charge. 
W. C. Lane, Assistant. 

HIGHWAY AND IRRIGATION ENGINEERING— 

W. S. Gearhart, in Charge of Highway Engineering. 
H. B. Walker, in Charge of Irrigation Engineering. 

PHYSICS— 

J. 0. Hamilton, in Charge. 

G. E. Raburn, Assistant. 

SHOP PRACTICE— 

W. W. Carlson, in Charge. 

STEAM AND GAS ENGINEERING— 

A. A. Potter, in Charge. 
S. L. Simmering, Assistant. 
W. H. Sanders, Assistant. 
G. S. Knapp, Assistant. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 47 



The College Cadet Corps 



Commissioned and Noncommissioned Officers. 

COMMANDANT OF CADETS, 

Second Lieutenant ROY ALISON HILL, Seventh U. S. Infantry, 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Assistant to the Commandant, 
Commissary Sergeant Edward Claeren, U. S. A. (Retired). 

Band Leader, 
Burr Howey Ozment. 

CORPS ORGANIZATION. 

Lieutenant Colonel O. E. Smith. 

Major, First Battalion P. E. Jackson. 

Major, Second Battalion A. P. Immenschuh. 

Captain and Adjutant R. R. Lancaster. 

Captain and Quartermaster T. K. Vincent. 

Lieutenant and Battalion Adjutant J. P. Rathbun. 

Sergeant Major J. S. Hagan. 

Quartermaster Sergeant E. V. Plush. 

Color Sergeant L. M. Mason. 

Color Sergeant Fred Stephenson. 

Battalion Sergeant Major E. W. Skinner. 

Battalion Sergeant Major , 

Chief Trumpeter John W. Musil. 

COMPANY A. COMPANY B. 

Captain : Captain : 

J. W. Linn. G. A. Russell. 

Lieutenant: Lieutenant: 

L. A. Moury. C. A. Hooker. 

First Sergeant: First Sergeant: 

H. R. Summer. J. B. Elliot. 

Quartermaster Sergeant: Quartermaster Sergeant: 

W. R. Hervey. D. E. Hull. 

Sergeants : Sergeants : 

C. A. Fickel. R. M. St. John. 

W. D. Adair. R. F. Mirick. 

C. L. Swenson. J. N. Wilmer. 

Corporals : Corporals : 

H. S. Winn. E. B., Goldsmith. 

C. R. Jaccard. W. S. Lay. 

G. C. Smith. J. M. Aye. 

G. M. Shick. A. J. Mangelsdorf. 

E. R. Martin. A. Walker. 

E. F. Wilson. J. E. Denman. 



48 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



COMPANY C. 

Captain.: 

L. A. Richards. 
Lieutenant: 

E. E. Thompson. 
First Sergeant: 

R. H. Kidd. 
Quartermaster Sergeant: 

G. L. Siefkin. 
Sergeants: 

A. N. Johnson. 
H. Tyrell. 

O. 0. Browning. 

Corporals-: 

P. B. Gwin. 
G. H. Mulford. 

F. A. Unruh. 

B. H. Rexroad. 

D. D. Bird. 
F. N. Jordan. 

COMPANY E. 
Captain: 

O. B. Burtis. 
Lieutenant*: 

F. R. Rawson. 
First Sergeant: 

A. E. Hopkins. 
Quartermaster Sergeant : 

G. M. Arnold. 
Sergeants : 

E. Ranney. 
A. E. Hylton. 
E. J. Otto. 

Corporals : 

P. D. Buchanan. 

0. 0. Mawry. 

1. R. Abel. 
J. R. Neale. 
H. Miller. 

L. N. Henderson. 



COMPANY D. 
Captain: 

T. F. Boise. 
Lieutenant : 

0. R. Walters. 
First Sergeants 

A. C. Christopherson. 
Quartermaster Sergeant: 

J. M. Arnold. 
Sergeants : 

T. R. Logan. 

W. E. Deal. 

E. J. Morris. 

Corporals : 

C. T. Bischoff. 
J. H. Cushman. 
G. L. Usselman. 
R. R. Neiswender. 

C. F. Lasswell. 
W. C. Lyness. 

COMPANY F. 

Captain: 

P. L. Mize. 
Lieutenant*: 

R. 0. Deming. 
First Sergeant: 

R. J. Montgomery. 
Quartermaster Sergeant: 

R. Ramsey. 
Sergeants : 

G. W. FitzGerald. 

W. L. Wilhoite. 

E. F. Shaw. 

Corporals : 

P. Carnahan. 
H. W. Lunnow. 
H. Green. 

D. C. Scott. 

F. M. Pickerell. 
C. B. Howe. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 



49 



COMPANY G. 

Captain : 

G. L. Farmer. 
LieutenanP: 

V. E. Bundy. 
First Sergeant: 

H. B. Linscott. 
Quartermaster Sergeant : 

C. H. Zimmerman. 
Sergeants : 

D. McLeod. 

C. B. Williams. 
John Linn. 

Corporals : 

W. LobdelL 
I. J. Jaques. 
J. R. Little. 
Thos. Jester. 



COMPANY H. 

Captain: 

C. W. Gartrell. 
Lieutenant : 

H. R. Joslin. 
First Sergeant: 

J. V. Guigley. 
Quartermaster Sergeant: 

J. B. Collister. 
Sergeants : 

0. W. Broberg. 

J. R. Mason. 

L. C. Mosier. 

Corporals : 

D. F. Fleming. 
W. T. White. 

D. C. Tate. 

A. G. Van Horn. 
R. N. Walker. 

E. L. T. Shimm. 



RECRUIT COMPANY. 



Lieutenant : 

H. B. Dudley. 

First Sergeant: 

P. C. McGilliard. 



Corporals : 

W. F. Pickett. 
A. J. Huffman. 
T. R. Knowles. 
C. Schultless. 



50 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



College Band 



band leader, 
Burr Howey Ozment. 



Drum Major 

Principal Musician 

Sergeants: 

J. T. Riney. 
G. E. Paiton. 
F. H. Robinson. 

Corporals : 

F. W. Albro. 
W. F. Heppe. 
A. W. McCarter. 
R. E. Stewer. 
F. B. Cromer. 

Privates: 

F. Borst. 
A. J. Dyatt. 
P. Falconer. 
L. M. Hanna. 
J. Maninger. 
J. A. Myers. 

G. F. Pallem. 
0. K Rumbel. 

F. L. Shelly. 
T. G. Spring. 
A. R. Tanner. 
L. R. Varcoe. 
L. 0. Wagner. 

G. S. McNamara. 



K. M. Murphy. 
E. W. Falconer. 



Sergeants : 

W. F. Smith. 
W. B. Smith. 

Corporals : 

A. M. Butcher. 
0. J. Markham. 
D. A. Robbins. 
F. W. Haines. 

Privates : 

D. L. Cahill. 
C. Elder. 
R. Heppe. 
F. J. Hanna. 
C. Maninger. 
R. H. Oliver. 
W. B. Palmer. 
J. Roeslar. 
J. W. Stockbrand. 
F. Steinkerehen. 
L. R. Vanter. 
L. L. Smith. 
L. G. Geisendorf. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 51 



History of the College 



The Kansas State Agricultural College had its origin in the 
Bluemont Central College, an institution established at Man- 
hattan under the control of the Methodist Episcopal Church of 
Kansas. The charter for this sectarian institution, approved 
February 9, 1858, provided for the establishment of a classical 
college, but contained the following interesting section : 

"The said association shall have power and authority to establish, in 
addition to the literary departments of arts and sciences, an agricultural 
department, with separate professors, to test soils, experiment in the 
raising of crops, the cultivation of trees, etc., upon a farm set apart for 
the purpose, so as to bring out to the utmost practical results the agri- 
cultural advantages of Kansas, especially the capabilities of the high 
prairie lands." 

The corner-stone of the new College was laid on May 10, 
1859, and instruction began about a year later. On March 1, 
1861, a bill passed the legislature establishing a State uni- 
versity at Manhattan, the Bluemont Central College building to 
be donated for the purpose. This measure, however, was 
vetoed by Governor Robinson. 

On July 2, 1862, President Lincoln signed the Morrill Act, 
"An act donating public lands to the several states and terri- 
tories which may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture 
and the mechanic arts." Section 1 of this act provides — 

"That there be granted to the several states, for the purposes herein- 
after mentioned, an amount of public lands to be appropriated to each 
state a quantity equal to 30,000 acres for each senator and representative 
in Congress to which the states are respectively entitled by the appor- 
tionment under the census of I860." 

Section 4 requires that the money from the sale of these 
lands — 

"Shall constitute a perpetual fund, the capital of which shall remain 
forever undiminished, and the interest of which shall be inviolably ap- 
propriated by each state which may take and claim the benefit of this act, 
to the endowment, support and maintenance of at least one college, where 
the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical 
studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning 
as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the 
legislatures of the states may respectively prescribe, in order to promote 
the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several 
pursuits and professions in life." 

Because of the nature of the endowment made by Congress, 
the institutions founded in accordance with this act are gen- 
erally known as the "land-grant" colleges. It may well be said 
that this was the most far-reaching and statesmanlike stroke 
of educational policy that any government has ever initiated. 



52 Kansas State Agricultural College 

On February 3, 1863, Governor Carney signed a joint resolu- 
tion passed by the Kansas legislature, in accordance with 
which the provisions of the Morrill Act "are hereby accepted 
by the State of Kansas; and the State hereby agrees and 
obligates itself to comply with all the provisions of said act." 
On February 16 of the same year the governor signed an act 
which permanently located the College at Manhattan, and 
provided — 

"That the location of the said college is upon this express condition, 
that the Bluemont Central College Association . . . shall . . . 
cede to the State of Kansas, in fee simple, the real estate, . . . 
together with all buildings and appurtenances thereunto belonging; and 
shall . . . transfer and deliver to said State the apparatus and 
library belonging to said Bluemont Central College Association." 

The three commissioners appointed by the governor selected 
82,313.52 acres of the 90,000 granted by Congress. The de- 
ficiency of 7686.48 acres — an amount selected and found to lie 
within a railroad grant — was not made up by Congress till 
1907. 

After the passage of the creative act, no subsequent legisla- 
tion was enacted by the federal government with reference to 
the "land-grant" colleges until the second Morrill Act, for the 
further endowment of agricultural colleges, was passed. This 
bill received the signature of President Harrison on August 30, 
1890. This act applied— 

"A portion of the proceeds of the public lands to the more complete 
endowment and support of the colleges for the benefit of agriculture and 
the mechanic arts established under the provision of an act of Congress 
approved July second, eighteen hundred and sixty-two." 

It provided — 

"That there shall be and hereby is annually appropriated, out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, arising from the sales 
of public lands, to be paid as hereinafter provided, to each state and ter- 
ritory for the more complete endowment and maintenance of colleges for 
the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts now established or which 
may be hereafter established, in accordance with an act of Congress 
approved July 2, 1862, the sum of $15,000 for the year ending June 30, 
1890, and an annual increase of the amount of such appropriation there- 
after for ten years by an additional sum of $1000 over the preceding 
year, and the average amount to be paid thereafter to each state and 
territory shall be $25,000, to be applied only to instruction in agriculture, 
the mechanic arts, the English language, and the various branches of 
mathematics, physical, natural and economic science, with special refer- 
ence to the industries of life and to the facilities for such instruction." 

The third and last act of Congress increasing the income 
of agricultural colleges is the Nelson amendment to the agri- 
cultural appropriation bill, which was approved March 4, 1907. 
In addition, however, to providing for an increase in the sup- 
port of these institutions from federal funds, the law contains 
the very significant provision specially authorizing the agri- 



Development 53 

cultural colleges to use a portion of this federal appropriation 
for the special preparation of instructors for teaching agri- 
culture and mechanic arts. The essential features of the 
Nelson amendment are embodied in the following quotation 
from the bill : 

"That there shall be and hereby is annually appropriated 'out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to be paid as here- 
inafter provided, to each state and territory for the more complete en- 
dowment and maintenance of agricultural colleges now established, or 
which may hereafter be established, in accordance with the act of Con- 
gress approved July 2, 1862, and the act of Congress approved August 30, 
1890, the sum of $5000, in addition to the sums named in the said act, 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1908, and an annual increase of the 
amount of such appropriation thereafter for four years by an additional 
sum of $5000 over the preceding year, and the annual sum to be paid 
thereafter to each state and territory shall be $50,000, to be applied only 
for the purposes of the agricultural colleges as denned and limited in the 
act of Congress approved July 2, 1862, and the act of Congress approved 
August 30, 1890; provided, that said colleges may use a portion of this 
money for providing courses for the special preparation of instructors 
for teaching the elements for agriculture and the mechanic arts." 

The Development of the Kansas Agricultural College 

The President and Faculty of the Bluemont Central College 
became the first board of instruction of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, when the former institution was transferred 
to the State and assumed its present name. The Bluemont 
Central College was a small institution of the older American 
classical type, the curriculum resting upon Greek, Latin, and 
mathematics as the chief fundamentals. Its transfer to the 
State, and its conversion into the State Agricultural College, 
involved at the time merely a change in name. The President 
and Faculty, and the curriculum, remained unchanged. The 
second catalogue, that of 1864-'65, mentions an "agricultural" 
course, comprising one preparatory and two collegiate years; 
but, although this course was strengthened from time to time, 
the classical studies nevertheless remained until the year 1873, 
when the character of the institution was radically changed. 
Intensely practical courses replaced the then existing ones. 
The new scheme of instruction involved the abolition of the 
classical course, and the introduction of a practical scheme of 
industrial education, which comprised a farmer's course of six 
years, a mechanic's course covering four years, and a woman's 
course requiring six years. Strong opposition to the new edu- 
cational policies was encountered, but the authorities of the 
institution adhered to them unswervingly, until the complete 
success of the new method silenced criticism. Thus the insti- 
tution became in fact what it had hitherto been only in name — 
an agricultural college. In 1879 the Faculty consisted of the 
President, five professors, and six instructors of lesser rank, 
with a student body of 207. During this period of development 



54 Kansas State Agricultural College 

the College was removed from the original Bluemont College 
site to its present campus, two miles nearer Manhattan. 

From 1879 to 1897 no great changes were made in the 
courses of study, but the work was systematized and strength- 
ened in many directions, retaining, however, the distinctive 
stamp of a college related to the industries. In 1897 the stu- 
dent enrollment was 734. The Faculty had grown in numbers, 
and the activities of the institution along investigative lines 
had been well begun through the organization of the Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station. Beginning with 1897, greater stress 
was laid upon the study of financial, economic, and social 
problems. Several men of considerable note were added to 
the Faculty for the purpose of strengthening these phases of 
educational work. In 1897 four professional courses, each 
four years in length, were organized — in agriculture, in 
mechanical engineering, in domestic science, and in general 
science. These years, therefore, mark the beginning of an era 
of broadening and diversification of the lines of instruction. 

In 1899 the administration of the institution changed, and 
during the ten years that followed the institution experienced 
an era of solid, substantial, and uninterrupted growth, gaining 
steadily in recognition and in influence over the State. 

In 1913-'14, the number of heads of departments and full 
professors was thirty-seven, while the entire Board of Instruc- 
tion and employees numbered 260. The student enrollment for 
the year 1913-'14, but not including the spring term or the 
Summer School, was 2742. During the fifteen-year period 
1899-1914 additional buildings to the value of about $500,000 
were erected on the campus. 

The history of the Kansas State Agricultural College may 
well be divided into five epochs. The first ten years, from 1863 
to 1873, may be called the classical period of the College. The 
succeeding period, from 1873 to 1879, was the formative stage, 
the years of the foundation of the Agricultural College prop- 
erly so called, and bore the stamp of a spirit of pure indus- 
trialism of the most intensely "practical" type. 

The next eighteen years, from 1879 to 1898, may be called 
the scientific culture period — a period in which, under modified 
ideals, the institution was sought to be used not so much as a 
tool to teach young men and women how to make a living as to 
teach them how to live, and strove to accomplish the end of 
character building by means of scientific and technical train- 
ing having especial reference to agriculture. 

Expansion of courses, with consequent increased flexibility, 
plasticity, and adaptability of the means of instruction to the 
various ends of industrial life, marked the following epoch of 
twelve years. In this period we see a rising tendency toward 
an increased acknowledgment of the Agricultural College as 
the guardian and custodian of the State's industrial interests, 



Development 55 

and a steady growth of settled confidence over the State in its 
ability to solve the State's industrial problems. 

The present time, therefore, finds the College and its in- 
separable coadjutor, the Experiment Station, occupying a 
position of far-reaching power and influence in connection 
with the most vital interests of the State of Kansas. 

The Agricultural College accomplishes the objects of its 
endowment in several ways. It offers a substantial training in 
mathematics, in the fundamental sciences, in language, in his- 
tory and civics, and in such other branches of human knowl- 
edge as experience has shown to be best adapted to give mental 
discipline, to develop good citizenship, and to furnish a proper 
equipment for entering upon active life. The combination of, 
industrial training with the usual class and laboratory work 
has a special educational value. By the training of the hands 
the student is made more efficient in every way, is brought into 
contact with practical things, and is educated toward, rather 
than away from, an interest in industry and manual exertion. 
The general training which the College offers aims, therefore, 
at an equally efficient development of the physical and the 
mental powers. The greatest immediate aid to improvement in 
social well-being and to betterment of the conditions of life is 
a thorough knowledge of science as applied to daily existence. 
In chemistry and physics, in geology, in botany, in bacteriol- 
ogy, in entomology, in mechanics, the student is brought to an 
understanding of the relation of man to the world around him, 
and to a knowledge of how to utilize natural forces for the 
protection and improvement of his own life. 

The College trains directly toward the productive occupa- 
tions in a considerable number of specialized branches. For 
example : In agriculture, the student may specialize in agron- 
omy, horticulture, forestry, animal husbandry, dairying, poul- 
try husbandry, or veterinary science. In engineering, the stu- 
dent may take work in mechanical, electrical, or civil engineer- 
ing, architecture, or printing. For the young women, training 
in domestic science, domestic art, home furnishing, home deco- 
ration, etc., is offered. 

A second large object of the College, made effective through 
the Agricultural Experiment Station, is to investigate the 
problems of agriculture in the widest sense. By conducting 
the researches of the Experiment Station in close connection 
with the educational work of the College, opportunity is af- 
forded students to gain an understanding and an apprecia- 
tion of the work of scientific investigation, and to become 
better able to appreciate the relation of science to agriculture. 
Opportunity is thus also offered to obtain such training as 
will fit competent students to become investigators, and to 
enter fields of agricultural leadership in the experiment sta- 
tions, in the United States Department of Agriculture, as 



56 Kansas State Agricultural College 

heads of private agricultural enterprises, or in the capacity of 
superintendents and managers of such undertakings. 

In addition to the regular educational work, the College now 
maintains, through the Division of College Extension, a highly- 
organized system of agricultural education among the farmers 
themselves. A corps of trained and efficient institute lecturers 
hold meetings in every county in the State, conduct seed trains, 
dairy trains, corn trains, alfalfa trains, and poultry trains, and 
publish two series of pamphlets of information and instruc- 
tion — one for rural teachers, the other for members of farm- 
ers' institutes. In addition to the regular staff of the Division 
of College Extension, many members of the College Board of 
Instruction, and of the staff of the Experiment Station, give 
several weeks of each year to the public work of the farmers' 
institutes. 

Finally, the College and the Station together are being in- 
creasingly charged by the State government with State in- 
dustrial and police duties, such as pure food investigations, 
control of feeding stuffs and fertilizers, State forestry work, 
and other similar duties. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 57 



The Experiment Stations 



The Agricultural Experiment Station 

The Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station was organized 
under the provisions of an act of Congress, approved 
March 2, 1887, which is commonly known as the "Hatch Act," 
and is officially designed as — 

"An act to establish agricultural experiment stations in connection 
with the colleges established in the several states under the provisions 
of an act approved July 2, 1862, and the acts supplementary thereto." 

The wide scope and far-reaching purposes of this act are 
best comprehended by an extract from the body of the measure 
itself, in which the objects of its enactment are stated as 
being — 

"To aid in acquiring and diffusing among the people of the United 
States useful and practical information on subjects connected with agri- 
culture, and to promote scientific investigation and experiment respecting 
the principles and practice of agricultural science." 

The law specifies in detail — 

"That it shall be the object and duty of said experiment stations to 
conduct original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of 
plants and animals; the diseases to which they are severally subject, with 
remedies for the same; the chemical composition of useful plants at their 
different stages of growth; the comparative advantages of rotative crop- 
ping as pursued under a varying series of crops; the capacity of new 
plants or trees for acclimation; the analysis of soils and waters; the 
chemical composition of manures, natural or artificial, with experiments 
designed to test their comparative effects on crops of different kinds; the 
adaptation and value of grasses for forage plants; the composition and 
digestibility of the different kinds of food for domestic animals; the 
scientific and economic questions involved in the production of butter and 
cheese; and such other researches or experiments bearing directly on 
the agricultural industry of the United States as may in each case be 
deemed advisable." 

On the day after the Hatch Act had received the signature 
of the President, the legislature of Kansas, being then in ses- 
sion, passed a resolution, dated March 3, 1887, accepting the 
conditions of the measure, and vesting the responsibility for 
carrying out its provisions in the Board of Regents of the 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 

Until 1908 the expenses of the Experiment Station were pro- 
vided for entirely by the federal government. The original 
creative act (the Hatch Act) carried an annual congressional 
appropriation of $15,000. No further addition to this amount 
was made until the passage of the Adams Act, which was ap- 
proved by the President March 16, 1906. This measure 



58 Kansas State Agricultural College 

provided, "for the more complete endowment and maintenance 
of agricultural experiment stations/' a sum beginning with 
$5000, and increasing each year by $2000 over the preceding 
year for five years, after which time the annual appropriation 
was to be $15,000— 

"To be applied to paying the necessary expenses of conducting original 
researches or experiments bearing directly on the agricultural industry 
of the United States, having due regard to the varying conditions and 
needs of the respective states or territories." 

It is further provided that — 

"No portion of said moneys exceeding five per centum of each annual 
appropriation shall be applied, directly or indirectly, under any pretense 
whatever, to the purchase, erection, preservation or repair of any building 
or buildings, or to the purchase or rental of land." 

The Adams Act, providing as it does for original investiga- 
tions, supplied the greatest need of the Experiment Station — 
the means of providing men and equipment for advanced re- 
search. Only such experiments may be entered upon, under 
the provisions of this act, as have first been passed upon and 
approved by the Office of Experiment Stations of the United 
States Department of Agriculture. 

In addition to these, there are now in progress, under the 
Hatch Act and by means of the State fund, a total of over fifty 
lines of investigation and experiment, covering all phases of 
agricultural investigation. 

The farms, live stock, laboratories, and general equipment of 
the College are all directly available for the use of the Experi- 
ment Station. 

In 1913 the legislature of Kansas appropriated the sum of 
$25,000 a year for the next biennium, for the further support 
of the Experiment Station. The income of the Experiment 
Station for the year 1913- , 14 is therefore derived as follows : 

Hatch fund (federal) $15,000 

Adams fund (federal) 15,000 

State appropriation (general) 25,000 

State appropriation (special) : 

Cooperative seed experiments 7,500 

Irrigation investigations 2,000 

Total $64,500 

The work of the Experiment Station is published in the 
form of bulletins, which record the results of investigations 
along agricultural lines. These bulletins are of three sorts: 
technical bulletins, which record the results of researches of a 
purely scientific character, provided for under the Adams Act ; 
farm bulletins which present the data of the technical bulletins 
in a simplified form, suitable for the general reader ; farm bul- 
letins in which a brief, condensed and popular presentation is 
made of data which call for immediate application, and can 
not await publication in the regular bulletin series. 



The Experiment Stations 59 

In addition to the bulletins, which report original investiga- 
tions, the Station also publishes a series of circulars for the 
purpose of conveying needed or useful information, not neces- 
sarily new or original. To date the publications of the Station 
number 197 bulletins and thirty-four circulars. 

All bulletins and other publications from the Experiment 
Station are sent without charge to citizens of the State. Any 
person in the State who so desires may have his name placed 
on the permanent mailing list of the Station. 

Letters of inquiry and general correspondence should be 
addressed : "Agricultural Experiment Station, Manhattan, 
Kan." Special inquiries should be directed, so far as possible, 
to the heads of departments having in charge the matters con- 
cerning which information is desired. 

PUBLIC WORK OF THE STATION 

In addition to the work of agricultural investigation and 
research, the State has enlarged the activities of the Station 
«tlong various lines of state executive or control work. 

One of the most important of these adjunct offices is that of 
State Dairy Commissioner, for which an appropriation of 
$7500 a year was made for 1914 and 1915. This official, ap- 
pointed by the Board of Administration, and having his office 
at the seat of the Agricultural College, is required (Laws of 
1909, ch. 237) — 

"To inspect or cause to be inspected all the creameries, public dairies, 
butter, cheese and ice-cream factories, or any place where milk or cream 
or their products are handled or stored within the State, at least once a 
year, or oftener if possible." 

He may in connection with the Board of Administration of 
the College — 

"Formulate and prescribe such reasonable rules and regulations for 
the operation of creameries, butter, cheese and ice-cream factories and 
public dairies as shall be deemed necessary by such board to fully carry 
out the provisions of this act." 

He may act on complaints regarding the sale of unwhole- 
some or unclean dairy products, and may prohibit their sale. 
He may — 

"Condemn for food purposes all unclean or unwholesome milk, cream, 
butter, cheese or ice-cream, wherever he may find them." 

Another important State function is that of the State Ento- 
mological Commission. (Laws of 1907, ch. 386 ; 1909, ch. 27.) 
This commission, created in 1907, was established — 

"To suppress and eradicate San Jose scale and other dangerous insect 
pests and plant diseases throughout the State of Kansas." 

The professors of entomology at the Agricultural College and 
at the University of Kansas are by law designated as two of 



60 Kansas State Agricultural College 

the five members of the above commission. Acting under the 
title of State entomologists, they divide between them the ter- 
ritory of the State, for purposes of inspection. 
They are empowered — 

"To enter upon any public premises ... or upon any land of 
any firm, corporation or private individual within the State of Kansas, 
for the purpose of inspection, destroying, treating or experiment upon 
the insects or diseases aforesaid." 

They may treat or cause to be treated "any and all suspi- 
cious trees, vines, shrubs, plants, and grains/' or, under cer- 
tain conditions, may destroy them. They must annually in- 
spect all nursery stock, and no nursery stock is to be admitted 
within the State without si^ch inspection. For the expenses of 
the work of the commission, $5000 was appropriated in 1913 
for each of the following two years. 

Concerned with the live-stock interests of the State is the 
State Live Stock Registry Board, with regard to which there 
is the following provision (Laws of 1913) : 

"Every person, persons, firm, corporation, company or association 
that shall stand, travel, advertise or offer for public service in any man- 
ner any stallion in the State of Kansas, shall secure a license certificate 
for such stallion from the Kansas State Live Stock Registry Board, as 
herein provided. Said board shall consist of the dean of the Division of 
Agriculture, head of the Animal Husbandry Department, and the head 
of the Veterinary Department of the Kansas State Agricultural College." 

To this board is assigned the duty of licensing stallions used 
for breeding purposes within the State, and authority to verify 
their breeding and to classify them under the following heads : 
pure-bred, grade, cross-bred, and scrub. No animal not thus 
approved and licensed with the board is permitted to be used 
for public breeding purposes. , 

The suppression of tuberculosis in cattle is also delegated by 
the State to the Agricultural College. (Laws of 1909, ch. 160.) 

Another provision for encouraging the improvement of live 
stock is embodied in an act of the legislature (Laws of 1909, 
ch. 46) — 

"Providing for experimental and demonstration work with live stock 
at the Kansas State Agricultural College." 

For this purpose there was appropriated the sum of $7500 — 

"Which shall be known as a revolving fund, to be used in providing 
experimental and demonstration work with live stock at the Kansas State 
Agricultural College, at Manhattan, Kan., under the direction and ap- 
proval of the Board of Regents of said institution; which said fund shall 
be used only for the purpose of purchasing live stock and feed, and such 
other expenses as may be necessary for caring for said live stock and con- 
ducting demonstrations and experiments therewith." 

Stock thus acquired can be sold by the Board of Administra- 
tion, when in the judgment of the Board it seems advisable, 
and the receipts from such sales are to be turned over to the 



The Experiment Stations 61 

State treasurer's office, there to constitute a "revolving fund," 
to be drawn upon for new purchases of live stock.' 

By legislative act (Laws of 1909, ch. 49), a "division of for- 
estry" at the Agricultural College is also provided for in the 
following terms : 

"For the promotion of forestry in Kansas there shall be established at 
the Kansas State Agricultural College, under the direction of the Board 
of Regents, a division of forestry. The Board of Regents of the Kansas 
State Agricultural College shall appoint a State forester, who shall have 
general supervision of all experimental and demonstration work in for- 
estry conducted by the Experiment Station. He shall promote practical 
forestry in every possible way, compile and disseminate information 
relative to forestry, and publish the results of such work through bul- 
letins, press notices, and in such other ways as may be most practicable 
to reach the public, and by lecturing before farmers' institutes, associa- 
tions, and other organizations interested in forestry." 

For carrying into effect the provisions of this act, there was 
appropriated for the fiscal years 1912 and 1913, $2000 each. 

The State has also placed the Experiment Station in charge 
of the execution of the acts concerning the manufacture and 
sale of live-stock remedies and commercial feeding-stuffs 
(Laws of 1913), and also of commercial fertilizers (Laws of 
1907, chapter 217). It is provided by the statutes that — 

"Every brand of live-stock remedy and every brand of commercial 
feeding-stuff offered or held for sale or sold within the State of Kansas 
shall be registered in the office of the Director of the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station of the Kansas State Agricultural College, and each sale 
of any such brand not so registered shall constitute a separate violation 
of this act." 

And— 

"Except as herein provided, it shall be unlawful within the State of 
Kansas to sell, offer for sale, or expose for sale any commercial fertilizer 
which has not been officially registered by the Director of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station of the Kansas State Agricultural College." 

These general provisions are limited in their application 
by important exceptions stated in the laws. The fees collected 
under these acts are used to defray the necessary expenses in- 
curred in carrying out the provisions of the act. 

It will thus be seen that the State of. Kansas is making in- 
creasing use of the scientific staff of the Experiment Station 
in matters of State importance requiring the application of 
technical knowledge. 

A late and important addition to the Experiment Station is 
the recently established Department of Milling Industry. The 
great economic importance of the wheat and milling interests 
of this State, and the difficult nature of the problems connected 
with the milling and baking quality of wheat, render it im- 
perative that scientific research be conducted on the subject. 
The hearty cooperation and financial support of all the millers' 
associations and of other commercial bodies rendered it finan- 



62 Kansas State Agricultural College 

cially possible to inaugurate this important experimental work 
until special legislative appropriation could be secured. The 
legislature of 1913 appropriated $7500 for mill equipment, and 
there is now installed the best equipped experimental milling 
plant in the United States. 

The research work includes a complete study of the growing, 
harvesting, storing and marketing practices and their relation 
to the milling value of wheat ; of systems of grading, and their 
effect upon the market value of grain; of insect enemies of 
wheat in the field and in storage; and of flour and mill by- 
products. There will also be conducted a comprehensive study 
of the effects of climate and soil upon the chemical composition 
of wheat, and upon its subsequent milling and baking quality. 
A specially equipped laboratory for carrying on experimental 
baking tests, and for making certain chemical determinations, 
has been installed. This will aid very materially in carrying 
on the research work. 

By the act of the legislature (Laws of 1911, ch. 23, p. 46) 
the Board of Administration is authorized — 

"To investigate the present methods used in growing and distributing 
agricultural seeds in the State; to determine by experiments the methods 
of growing seed best adapted to different localities; to encourage farmers 
in the use of the best methods of seed production; to determine by in- 
vestigation those localities most in need of improved seed, and to aid 
such localities in securing desirable seed." 

For carrying out the provisions of this act, the sum of 
$7500 is appropriated for each of the two years 1914 and 1915. 

Experiments and demonstrations on the proper use of irri- 
gation waters, in cooperation with the irrigation investiga- 
tions of the United States Department of Agriculture, are 
authorized by act of the legislature (Laws of 1911, ch. 214, 
p. 378). For this purpose there was appropriated the sum of 
$2000 annually for the years 1913-'14 and 1914- , 15. 

The government supplies an equal amount of money each 
year, making a total of $4000 a year for cooperative irrigation 
investigations. 

Branch Agricultural Experiment Stations 

Fort Hays Branch Station 

The land occupied by this Station is a part of what was origi- 
nally the Fort Hays military reservation. Being no longer re- 
quired for military purposes, it was turned over to the De- 
partment of the Interior October 22, 1899, for disposal under 
the act of Congress of July 5, 1884. Before final disposition of 
this land was made, however, the Kansas legislature, in Feb- 
ruary, 1895, passed a resolution requesting the Congress of the 
United States to donate the entire reservation of 7200 acres 
to the State of Kansas for the purposes of agricultural educa- 
tion and research, for the training of teachers, and for the 



Branch Experiment Stations 63 

establishment of a public park. Bills giving effect to this re- 
quest were introduced into Congress without avail, until the 
fifty-sixth Congress, when, through the influence of Senator, 
later Regent, W. A. Harris, and of Congressman Reeder, a bill 
was passed, setting aside this reservation "for the purposes of 
establishing an experimental station of the Kansas Agricul- 
tural College and a western branch of the Kansas State Nor- 
mal School thereon and a public park." This bill was approved 
by the President on March 28, 1900. By act of the State legis- 
lature, approved on February 7, 1901, the act of Congress 
donating this land and imposing the burden of the support of 
these institutions was accepted. The same session of the legis- 
lature passed an act providing for the organization of a branch 
experiment station and appropriating a small fund for pre- 
liminary work. 

The land at the Fort Hays Branch Station consists mainly 
of high rolling prairie, with a limited area of rich alluvium 
bordering on a creek, and is situated on the edge of the semi- 
arid plains region. It is well suited for experimental and 
demonstration work in dry farming, in irrigation, and in crop, 
forestry, and orchard tests, under conditions of limited rainfall 
and high evaporation. 

The work of this Station is confined to the study of the 
problems peculiar to the western half of the State, and relates 
especially to crop production under limited rainfall, to the 
origination of varieties better adapted to the climatic condi- 
tions there prevailing, and to studies of the systems of animal 
husbandry suited to this region. A systematic study of the 
value of trees as preventives of soil drifting is being made on 
a scale sufficiently large to bring definite conclusions. The 
facilities of this Station are being used for the growing of 
large quantities of pure seed of the strains and varieties which 
have proved in actual test to be most productive in the west- 
ern part of the State. 

This Station is supported entirely by State funds and by 
the sale of farm products. Under the terms of the acts of 
Congress establishing and supporting agricultural experiment 
stations, and under the rulings of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, . none of the funds appropriated by the 
federal government may be used for the support of branch 
experiment stations. 

The State appropriation for the maintenance of the Fort 
Hays Branch Experiment Station is $25,000 for 1914 and 
$25,000 for 1915. 

Garden City Branch Station 

In 1906 the county commissioners of Finney county pur- 
chased, for purposes of agricultural experimentation, a tract of 
land amounting to 320 acres, situated four and one-half miles 
from Garden City, on the unirrigated upland. 



64 Kansas State Agricultural College 

This land has been leased for a. term of ninety-nine years 
to the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station as an "ex- 
perimental and demonstration farm," for the purpose of de- 
termining the methods of culture, crop varieties, and crop 
rotations best suited to the southwestern portion of the State, 
under dry-land farming conditions. A pumping plant irri- 
gating from eighty to one hundred acres has been installed for 
the purpose of investigating the expense of pumping and the 
cost of equipment necessary for plants of this type which" are 
common in the shallow-water district between Garden City 
and Scott City and along the Arkansas valley. The "duty of 
water" and the methods of applying water are objects of in- 
vestigation. For improvements and maintenance of this 
Station the sum of $5000 a year was appropriated for 1914 
and 1915. 

Other Branch Stations 

Branch stations are maintained at Dodge City and Tribune. 
At these stations experimental and demonstration work is 
conducted for the benefit of the districts surrounding these 
points. Cropping systems, summer-fallow methods, time of 
planting, variety testing, and breeding of special crops are 
the principal work undertaken. At Dodge City a dairy herd 
is maintained. 

The legislature of 1913 appropriated for the maintenance 
of the Dodge City Station $2500 for the year 1914, and $2500 
for the year 1915, and for the Tribune Station $2500 for 1914, 
and $2500 for 1915. The legislature of 1913 also appropriated 
$6000 for the establishment of a Branch Station in Kearny 
county, with $2000 maintenance for 1913- , 14, and $2000 for 
1914-'15. It also appropriated $11,000 for the establishment 
of a Branch Station in Thomas county, with $2000 additional 
for maintenance for 1913- ? 14, and $2000 for 1914-'15. 

The Engineering Experiment Station 

The Engineering Experiment Station was established for 
the purpose of carrying on continued series of tests of engi- 
neering and manufacturing value to the State of Kansas, on a 
scale sufficiently large for the results to be of direct commer- 
cial value. 

Tests of cement and concrete are being conducted, using 
principally Kansas-made cements and such materials for the 
aggregate in the concrete as can be found in different localities 
in the State. In connection with this series of tests, a study is 
being made of the waterproofing and coloring of cement build- 
ing blocks. 

Tests of Kansas coals are being made. These include mine- 
run, slack, nut/ screened, lump, and washed-pea coals. The 
purpose is not only to determine the relative values of the dif- 



Engineering Experiment Station 65 

ferent coals for steam generation, birt more particularly to 
ascertain the best methods of firing- the coals of each locality, 
and the relative values of the different kinds of coal obtained 
from any single mine. These tests are conducted with both 
natural and induced draft, the Station owning an induced- 
draft equipment and economizer. 

The Station owns a 100-horsepower and a 150-horsepower 
gas producer using bituminous coal. Tests that have been car- 
ried on have been for the purpose of determining the relative 
values of the various coals as regards (1.) cost per cubic foot of 
gas; (2) adaptability with respect to mechanical manipulation 
in the producer; (3) freedom from sulphur and disagreeable 
gases; (4) the production of tar and otb.er by-products; special 
research. 

The producer testing equipment includes calorimeters for 
the analysis of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels, a Venturi tube 
for the measurement of gas, a thermoelectric pyrometer, and 
such other apparatus as is essential for the carrying out of 
complete tests. Each test is conducted for a period of several 
weeks, in order to eliminate errors in tii€ estimation of the coal 
and "stand-by" losses. 

As there are but very few other plants in the country satis- 
factorily using bituminous coal for producer gas, it is believed 
that the experiments now being- carried on will give valuable 
results. 

Other experiments now in progress are concerned with 
(1) lubricants and bearings; (2) power required for driving 
machine tools; (3) loss of power in "transmission by shaft, 
bearings, chains, and gears; (4) the relative adaptability, effi- 
ciency and cost of gasoline, kerosene an. d denatured alcohol for 
internal-combustion engines; (5) the eost of compressing air 
and the efficiency of compressed air fox power purposes; (6) 
endurance of paints. As applied to roois, the paint tests have 
been in progress for five years, and they will be extended to in- 
clude other cases of exposure to weatheir. The investigation is 
directed especially to the relation of tha chemical nature of the 
pigments and of the oils employed in paanting to the durability 
of the paints. (7) Tests on pipe-coverixig ; (8) tests on heavy- 
oil engines. 

Among the projected investigations are (1) underground 
water-flow in various parts of the Sta"te, and methods of de- 
veloping it for irrigation; (2) the possibilities of develop- 
ing waterpower for small plants to b& used on farms and in 
isolated communities for driving machinery, either directly or 
by electric transmission,, and for lighting; this investigation to 
include the preparation and publication of plans for these 
plants; (3) the continuation of investigations as to the 
strength of structural details in timber*, metal, and reinforced 



66 Kansas State Agricultural College 

concrete'; (4) studies of the tractive effect or efficiency of 
draught horses; (5) tests of small gasoline-electric units; 
(6) methods of cooling condensed steam; (7) tests of Kansas 
brick and other road material. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 67 



Grounds, Buildings, and Equipment 



The college campus occupies a commanding and attractive 
site upon an elevation adjoining the western limits of the city 
of Manhattan, with electric car service into town and to the 
railway stations. The grounds are tastefully laid out accord- 
ing to the designs of a landscape architect, and are extensively 
planted with a great variety of beautiful and interesting trees, 
arranged in picturesque groups, masses, and border plantings, 
varied by banks of shrubbery and interspersed with extensive 
lawns, gardens, and experimental fields. Broad, well-shaded 
macadamized avenues lead to all parts of the grounds. Ce- 
ment walks connect all of the buildings with one another and 
with the entrances. Including the campus of 160 acres, the 
College owns 748 acres of land at Manhattan, valued at 
$185,000, and rents 522 acres in addition. Outside the campus 
proper, all of the land is devoted to educational and experi- 
mental work in agriculture. Within the college grounds, most 
of the space not occupied by buildings and needed for drives 
and ornamental planting is devoted to orchards, forest and 
fruit nurseries, vineyards, and gardens. A number of fields 
in the northern and western portions of the campus are used 
for general experimental work by various departments. 

The college buildings, twenty-one in number, are harmoni- 
ously grouped, and are uniformly constructed of limestone 
obtained from the college quarries. A central power plant 
furnishes steam heat and electric light and power to the 
buildings, and a plant for the manufacture of producer gas 
supplies some of the laboratories and shops. The College owns 
and operates its own system of waterworks and is provided 
with a complete sewerage system. 

Agricultural Hall (New). Cost of portions now com- 
pleted, $125,000; cost of building when developed and com- 
pleted as planned, $500,000. The completed building will con- 
sist of a central portion (130x80 feet), with basement and 
three stories; of two wings (each 80x169 feet), with base- 
ment and three stories, and with a sub-basement under half 
of the east wing; and of a stock- judging pavilion placed back 
of the central portion and between the wings. This pavilion 
is now completed, and contains tie and box stalls and two large 
stock-judging rooms (45x100 feet), each having a seating 
capacity of 475. Each of these rooms may be divided into 
two, with a passage between, by the use of curtains. The east 
wing of the building is used by the Departments of Agronomy, 
Animal Husbandry, Milling Industry, and Poultry Husbandry. 



68 Kansas State Agricultural College 

This wing contains, besides offices and recitation rooms of 
these departments and the general offices of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station, a complete small flour mill, and labora- 
tories for grain judging. Value of equipment and apparatus : 
Agronomy, $6460; Animal Husbandry, $2339; Executive De- 
partment, $1800; Experiment Station, $2958; Milling Indus- 
try, $10,350 ; Poultry Husbandry, $2219. Erected, 1912. 

Agricultural Hall (Old). Erected, 1900; cost, $25,000; 
dimensions, 90 x 95 feet; two stories and basement. Occupies 
the original site of the president's house, destroyed by light- 
ning in 1896. Contains classrooms and offices of the School 
of Agriculture. Value of equipment, $515. 

Anderson Hall. Erected, 1879; cost, $79,000; dimensions, 
152 x 250 feet ; two stories and basement. Contains the offices 
of administration of the College, a lecture hall, the college post 
office, offices of the Division of College Extension, and offices 
and classrooms of the Departments of Architecture and Draw- 
ing, Economics, English Language, English Literature, and 
Mathematics. Value of equipment and apparatus, $11,777. 

Auditorium. Erected, 1904; cost, $40,000; dimensions, 
113 x 125 feet. Seating capacity, 2300. Contains also, the 
offices and music rooms of the Department of Music. Value 
of equipment : Executive Department, $176 ; Music, $2824. 

Chemistry Annex. Erected, 1876; cost, $8000; dimen- 
sions, 35 X 110 and 46 X 175 feet, in the form of a cross. 
Originally erected as a chemical laboratory; occupied by the 
Department of Chemistry until 1900, when a fire destroyed 
the interior. The building was reconstructed in 1902, at a 
cost of $5000, for use as a women's gymnasium. Since the 
fall of 1911 the building has been used by the Department of 
Chemistry. Value of apparatus and equipment, about $4000. 

Dairy Barn. Erected, 1900; cost, $4000; dimensions, 
40 x 175 feet. Fitted with modern swinging stalls for eighty 
head of cows, and arranged in two rows with driveway be- 
tween. Value of equipment : Dairy Husbandry, $1400. 

Dairy Hall. Erected, 1904; cost, $15,000; dimensions, 
72 x 103 feet ; one story and basement. Contains butter- 
manufacturing rooms, hand-separator room, laboratory, class 
room, three offices, and two refrigerating rooms. Occupied 
entirely by the Department of Dairy Husbandry. Value of 
equipment and apparatus, $7800. 

Denison Hall. Erected, 1902; cost, $70,000; dimensions, 
96x166 feet; two stories and basement. The east wing is 
occupied throughout by the laboratories, class rooms, and 
offices of the Department of Chemistry. The west wing is 
occupied by the Department of Electrical Engineering and 
by the Department of Physics. Value of equipment and ap- 
paratus : Chemistry, $29,436 ; Electrical Engineering, $17,271 ; 
Executive, $990; Physics, $8979. 



Grounds, Buildings and Equipment 69 

Domestic Science and Art Hall. Erected, 1908; cost, 
$70,000; dimensions, 92 x 175 feet; two stories and basement. 
The first floor and basement are occupied by the laboratories, 
class rooms, and offices of the Department of Domestic Sci- 
ence; the second floor is occupied by the laboratories, class 
rooms, and offices of the Department of Domestic Art. Value 
of equipment and apparatus: Domestic Science, $11,966; 
Domestic Art, $4011 ; Executive, $526. 

Engineering Shops. These consist of several connected 
structures, erected at different times. The original building, 
now used as the woodworking shop, was erected in 1876; a 
series of additions having later been successively made, the 
present group is the result. The cost of the whole amounts to 
$35,000. A portion of the building is two stories high. On the 
upper floor, which has a floor area of 9260 square feet, are 
class rooms, drafting rooms, pattern storage room and offices 
of the Departments of Steam and Gas Engineering, Applied 
Mechanics and Machine Design, and Shop Practice. The wood- 
working shop (35 x 219 feet) is equipped with the necessary 
bench tools and woodworking machinery. Adjoining is the 
machine shop (40 x 170 feet), supplied with benches and tools 
and amply equipped with the necessary machine tools. The 
blacksmith shop (50 x 100 feet) contains 35 forges of modern 
type, connected with power blast and down-draft exhaust. 
Adjoining is the lecture hall, with demonstration forge and 
equipment. The iron foundry (27 x 100 feet) and brass foun- 
dry (24 x 34 feet) are well supplied with the necessary equip- 
ments. The wash and locker room (36 x 40 feet) contains 250 
steel lockers. A general supply room (22x24 feet) is con- 
veniently located for storing the necessary small supplies. 
Value of equipment and apparatus, $38,012. 

Fairchild Hall. Erected, 1894 ; cost, $67,750 ; dimensions, 
100 x 140 feet ; two stories, basement, and attic. On the first 
floor are the college library and reading rooms, a newspaper 
reading room, offices of the librarian and his assistants, and 
the general museum. On the second floor are the offices, class 
rooms and laboratories of the Departments of Zoology, Ento- 
mology, and Geology, and of History and Civics. The museums 
of natural history are placed here also. The basement is 
occupied largely by recitation rooms and offices of the Depart- 
ment of History and Civics and the Department of Public 
Speaking. Value of equipment and apparatus: Entomology, 
Geology, and Zoology, $26,575 ; Executive, $1209 ; History and 
Civics, $515; Library, $123,110. 

Farm Barn. Erected, 1913 ; cost, $17,000 ; a stone structure, 
dimensions, 80 x 160 feet. The west wing contains nine box 
stalls and twenty-six single stalls, equipped with sanitary feed 
mangers and racks and designed especially for the housing of 
horses. The east wing contains twelve box stalls and thirty 



70 Kansas State Agricultural College 

single stalls for the breeding cattle and show herd. Center 
section, office and carriage rooms, with basement for heating 
apparatus. Value of equipment : Department of Animal Hus- 
bandry, $1000. 

Farm Mechanics Hall. Erected, 1870; cost, $11,250; di- 
mensions, 46 x 95 feet ; two stories. The first building erected 
on the present campus. Originally designed as a college barn, 
and first used for that purpose. Later used as a general col- 
lege building, then by the Department of Botany, and after- 
wards by the Department of Veterinary Medicine. The first 
floor, a large hall, was used by the Department of Military 
Science for many years, as an armory. The entire building 
has been given over for the use of the Department of Farm 
Mechanics, and is filled with all types of farm machinery. 
Value of equipment, $7000. 

Horticultural Barn. Erected, 1880; cost, $1000. Con- 
tains storeroom, granary, and stable room for several horses. 

Horticultural Hall. Erected, 1907; cost, $50,000; di- 
mensions, 72 x 116 feet. This building, one of the best and 
most commodious on the campus, is now used by the Depart- 
ments of Botany; Horticulture, and Forestry. Its class rooms, 
laboratories, museums, and equipment are modern and ample. 
Value of equipment : Botany, $25,372 ; Executive, $609 ; For- 
estry, $435 ; Horticulture, $4929. 

Horticultural Hall (Old). Erected, . 1877 ; cost, $4000; 
dimensions, 32 x 80 feet ; one story and basement. 

Horticultural Laboratory. Erected, 1888; cost, $5000; 
dimensions, 30 x 30 feet ; one story and basement. Used for 
many years by the Department of Horticulture and Ento- 
mology, then for horticultural work when that was made a 
separate department. Contains offices occupied by the State 
Dairy Commissioner. Five propagating houses are connected 
with it. Value of equipment, $987. 

Kedzie Hall. Erected, 1897; cost, $16,000; dimensions, 
70 x 84 feet ; two stories and basement. The first floor and 
basement are occupied by the Department of Printing and by 
offices of the Department of the English Language ; the second 
floor is divided into general class rooms and offices used by 
the Departments of Industrial Journalism and the English 
Language. Originally constructed for the use of the Depart- 
ments of Domestic Science and Domestic Art, the building 
has been used for present purposes since 1908. Value of 
equipment and apparatus: English Language, $455; Execu- 
tive, $380 ; Industrial Journalism, $563 ; Printing, $7187. 

Mechanical Engineering Hall. Erected, 1909; cost, 

3,000; dimensions, 113x200 feet; three stories in height, 
but much of it built on the gallery plan rather than by com- 
plete floor separation into different stories. This building con- 
tains the general offices of the Division of Engineering, the 



Grounds, Buildings and Equipment 71 

offices and drafting rooms of the Departments of Civil En- 
gineering and Architecture, an engineering reference library 
and reading room, an amphitheater for lectures and demon- 
strations, and the experimental laboratories for applied me- 
chanics, hydraulics, thermodynamics, transmission, and gas 
and oil engines. The engines, turbines, generators and boilers 
that furnish power and light for the College are installed in 
this building. Value of equipment and apparatus, $77,087. 

Nichols Gymnasium. Erected, 1911; cost, $122,000; di- 
mensions, 102 x 221 feet ; three stories and basement. The 
building consists of a main section and two wings. The main 
section (85x141 feet), consisting of two stories and a base- 
ment, is used as a men's gymnasium and armory, and contains 
a running track, sixteen laps to the mile. The east half of the 
basement of the main section contains a swimming pool, baths, 
rest room, etc., for women; the west half contains a swim- 
ming pool and baths for men. The east wing (40 x 102 feet) 
contains the women's gymnasium, class rooms and offices of 
the Department of Military Training and several literary 
society halls. The west wing (40 x 102 feet) contains the 
offices of the Director of Physical Training, a large locker 
room for men, class rooms, and offices of the Department of 
German, and several literary society halls. This building, 
which is modern in every respect, is constructed on the old 
armory-castle type and is a magnificent piece of architecture. 
Value of apparatus and equipment, $4939. 

Veterinary Hall. Erected, 1908; cost, $70,000; dimen- 
sions, 133 x 155 feet ; two stories and basement. Occupied by 
the laboratories, demonstration and dissecting rooms, class 
rooms and offices of the Departments of Veterinary Medicine 
and Bacteriology. Value of equipment and apparatus : Vet- 
erinary Medicine, $14,838; Bacteriology, $6524; Executive, 
$404. 

In addition to the substantial stone buildings mentioned 
above the College has a number of other buildings, among 
others the following: 

Serum Barn. Erected, 1914; cost, $3000; dimensions, 
92x96 feet; contains thirty pens, each 8x12 feet, and two 
feed rooms of the same dimensions. This is a frame and 
cement building situated three-quarters of a mile north of the 
College campus. 

Serum Building. Erected, 1914; cost, $7000; constructed 
of brick; dimensions, 24 x 60 feet; two stories. 



72 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Library 



The general College Library consists of all books belonging 
to the College, including the library of the Experiment Sta- 
tion, which is incorporated with it. On January 1, 1914, the 
Library contained 44,236 bound volumes, besides much un- 
bound material. It receives currently about four hundred 
serial publications. As a depository the Library receives the 
documents and other publications of the United States gov- 
ernment. The books are classified according to the Dewey 
system and are indexed in a dictionary card catalogue. 

All students, as well as all officers of administration and in- 
struction, have the privilege of direct access to the book stacks. 
The Library is primarily for free reference use, but the privi- 
lege of drawing books is accorded to all those connected with 
the College as registered students or as members of the Fac- 
ulty. Books not specially reserved may be drawn for home 
use for two weeks. All books are subject to recall at any time. 

General reference books, books reserved for classes, general 
periodicals, and certain other groups of books are to be con- 
sulted only in the reading rooms. They may not be loaned 
from the Library except when the reading rooms are closed. 
They must then be returned to the Library by the time it next 
reopens. Any violation of the regulations of the Library 
subjects the offender to a fine, or to a withdrawal of Library 
privileges, or to both, according to the gravity of the offense. 
More serious offenses, such as mutilation or theft of books or 
periodicals, are considered just causes for suspension or expul- 
sion of the offender, who is also required to make good the loss 
incurred. 

Reading Rooms. — Three reading rooms are maintained in 
connection with the Library : the general reference room, con- 
taining encyclopedias, dictionaries, atlases, bibliographies, and 
general reference books ; the special reference room, containing 
books reserved for classes ; and the periodical room, containing 
current magazines and the important daily and weekly Kansas 
newspapers. These rooms are freely open to the students and 
to the public for purposes of reading and study. 

Divisional Libraries. — Divisional and departmental collec- 
tions are deposited in certain College buildings apart from the 
main Library. These collections are for the special conven- 
ience of the instructors and students of the departments con- 
cerned. They are under the direction of the Librarian and 
are accessible to all students at regular hours. 

Hours of Opening. — The Library is open daily, except on 
legal holidays, from 7:30 o'clock A.M. to 5:30 o'clock P.M. 
during the regular College year. During vacation periods it 
is open daily from 8 o'clock A. M. to 5 o'clock p. M. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue T& 

Requirements for Admission 



The entrance requirements to the College are made broad 
and flexible, only fundamental subjects being definitely re- 
quired. These requirements are made upon the supposition 
that high schools are local institutions in which the courses 
should be adapted to the needs of the individual localities, and 
that college. entrance requirements should be such as to take 
the output of the high schools, rather than to determine the 
nature of the work offered in them. 

Persons, to be admitted to any department of the College, 
must be at least fourteen years of age. Fifteen units of high- 
school work are required for admission to the freshman class. 
A unit is defined to be the work done in an accredited high 
school or academy in five recitation periods a week for one 
school year. All persons who offer fifteen units of work done 
in an accredited high school, and accepted by such high school 
for graduation, will be admitted to the freshman class. One 
who offers fourteen such units will also be admitted as a fresh- 
man, but will be conditioned in one unit. Such deficiency must 
be made up the first year that the student is in attendance. If 
not made up within that time college credits are taken in its 
place. 

For courses in the divisions of agriculture, home economics 
or general science the high-school work offered must include 
three units of English, two units of mathematics, and one unit 
of physics. For courses in the division of mechanic arts the 
high-school work offered must include, in addition to the pre- 
ceding, another unit of mathematics. Students lacking any of 
these must make them up before graduation, and before being 
assigned to dependent subjects. 

It is recommended that all high-school students planning to 
enter the College include a year of botany in their high-school 
course. 

ENTRANCE SUBJECTS 

The subjects from which entrance credit may be offered, 
together with the number of units, are arranged in eight 
groups, as follows : 

Group I 

English Three or four units 

Latin, one, two, three, or four units 
Group II Greek, one, two, three, or four units 

Foreign German, one, two, three, or four units 

Languages French, one, two, three, or four units 

Spanish, one, two, three, or four units 



74 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



Group III 
Mathematics 



Group IV 
Natural 
Sciences 



Group V 

History and 
Social Sciences 



Group VI 

Normal Train- 
ing Subjects 



Group VII 

Industrial 
Subjects 



Group VIII 
Commercial 
Subjects 



Elementary algebra, one or one and one-half units 
Plane geometry, one unit 
Solid geometry, one-half unit 
Plane trigonometry, one-half unit 
Advanced algebra, one-half unit 

Physical geography, one-half or one unit 
Physics, one unit 
Chemistry, one unit 
Botany, one-half or one unit 
Zoology, one-half or one unit 
Physiology, one-half or one unit 
General Biology, one-half or one unit 

Greek and Roman History, one unit 
Medieval and Modern History, one unit 
English History, one unit 
American History, one unit 
Economics, one-half or one unit 
Sociology, one-half unit 
Civics, one-half unit 

Psychology, one-half unit 

Methods and Management, one-half unit 

Higher Arithmetic, one-half unit 

Reviews — 

Grammar, twelve weeks 1 
Geography, twelve weeks [■ one unit 
Reading, twelve weeks 

Music, one unit 

Agriculture, one-half or one, two, three, or four units 

Drawing*, one-half or one unit 

Woodwork, one-half, one or two units 

Forging, one-half or one unit 

Domestic Scienoe, one-half, one or two units 

Domestic Art, one-half, one or two units 

Commercial Law, one-half unit 
Commercial Geography, one-half unit 
Bookkeeping, one-half or one unit 
Stenography and Typewriting, one-half or one unit 



DEFICIENCIES 

The courses in the School of Agriculture offered in connec- 
tion with the College give every needed opportunity for stu- 
dents of the College to make up anything lacking in their prep- 
aration for entrance. All such entrance deficiencies must be 
made up before the beginning of the sophomore year. No 
student is registered in the senior class unless all deficiencies 
of the preceding years have been provided for. Candidates for 
graduation must make up all deficient subjects before the be- 
ginning of the spring term of the senior year. No student is 
considered a candidate for graduation the next June who is de- 
ficient more than three full subjects in addition to his regular 
assignment at the beginning of the fall term. No student who 
fails or is conditioned or found deficient in any subject, or 



Requirements for Admission 75 

whose grade in more than one subject falls below G in any 
term, is allowed to carry extra work during the succeeding 
term. 

ADVANCED CREDIT 

At the discretion of the President, students who present cer- 
tificates showing credits for college work done in other in- 
stitutions are allowed hour-for-hour credit on courses in this 
College in so far as they may be directly applied, or can be 
accepted as substitutions or electives. In cases m which it is 
impossible for one to furnish an acceptable certificate con- 
cerning work upon which advanced credit is asked, examina- 
tions are given, if the subject has been studied under competent 
instruction. 

ADMISSION 

Admission by Examination. Examinations for admission 
will be held at the College on Tuesday, September 15, 1914; 
Monday, January 4, 1915, for the winter term; and Monday, 
March 29, 1915, for the spring term. 

Admission by Certificate. The applicant is required to 
submit to the committee on admission a certificate of the high- 
school or academy credit properly certified to by the authori- 
ties of the institution in which the work was done. Blanks will 
be furnished by the College for this purpose. It is requested 
that all work done in such high school or academy be presented 
upon these blanks, in order to expedite the granting of credit 
to such applicants as are entitled to it. 

It is greatly to the advantage of the prospective student to 
see to it that this blank, properly filled out, be sent to the College 
as soon as possible after graduation. A permit to register will 
then be sent him by the Registrar in advance of hi-s coming in 
September. This will greatly facilitate the work of entrance. 
The student will present this permit at the registration room 
in Nichols Gymnasium, and will not be compelled to wait his 
turn to meet the committee on admission. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

In recognition of the fact that experience and maturity tend 
to compensate, in a measure at least, for lack of scholastic at- 
tainments, the College admits as special students those who 
are twenty-one years of age or older, without requiring them 
to pass the regular examinations, provided (1) they show 
good reason for not taking a regular course; (2) they be 
assigned only to such work as they are qualified to early suc- 
cessfully; (3) they do superior work in the subjects assigned. 

A special student is assigned by the dean of the division in 
which occur the major subjects to be pursued. 



76 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



HIGH SCHOOLS IN ACCREDITED RELATIONS 
WITH THE COLLEGE 

(Graduates admitted without examination) 



Abilene 

Admire 

Agra 

Alma 

Alden 

Almena 

Alta Vista 

Alton 

Altoona 

Anthony 

Americus 

Argentine 

Arkansas City 

Ashland 

Atlanta 

Attica 

Atchison 

Atchison County 

(Effingham) 
Augusta 
Axtell 
Baker Academy 

(Baldwin) 
Baldwin 
Basehor 
Barnard 
Baxter Springs 
Beattie 
Belle Plaime 
Belleville 
Beloit 
Belpre 
Benedict 
Beverly 
Blue Mound 
Blue Rapids 
Bonner Springs 
Bronson 
Brookville 
Bucklin 
Buffalo 
Bunker Hill 
Burden 
Burlingame 
Burlington 
Burns 
Burr Oak 
Burrton 
•Caldwell 
Caney 
■Canton 
Carbondale 
•Catholic High School 

(Kansas City, Kan.) 
Cawker City 
Centralia 
Chase 
Chase County 

(Cottonwood Falls) 
•Chanute 
"Cheney 
•Cherokee County 

(Columbus) 
Cherry vale 
•Cbetopa 
Cheyenne* County 

(St. Francis) 
Cimarron 
Circleville 
Claflin 
Clay County 

(Clay Center) 
Clearwater 
Clifton 



Clyde 
Coffeyville 
Coldwater 
Colony 
Concordia 
Conway Springs 
Corning 
Council Grove 
Crawford County 

(Cherokee) 
Cunningham 
Decatur County 

(Oberlin) 
Dickinson County 

(Chapman) 
Deiphos 
Derby 
Dexter 
Dixon Township 

(Argonia) 
Dodge City 
Douglass 
Easlon 
El Dorado 
Edwardsville 
Ellinwood 
Ellis 

Ellsworth 
Elsmore 
Elwood 
Emporia 
Englewood 
Enterprise 
Erie 
Esbon 
Eskridge 
Evdora 
Eureka 
Everest 
Fairview 
Florence 
Formoso 
Fort Scott 
Fowler 
Frankfort 
Fredonia 
Frontenac 
Galena 

Garden Plain 
Cfarden City 
Garnett 
Gas City 
Girard 
Glasco 
Olen Elder 
Goddard 
Goff 
Grant County 

(New Ulysses) 
Great Bend 
Greeley County 

(Tribune) 
Greenleaf 
Grenola 
Gypsum 
Halstead 
Hanover 
Harper 
Hartford 
Harveyville 
Havensville 
Hays 
Hazelton 
Herington 



Hesston Academy 

Hiawatha 

Hill City 

Highland 

Hillsboro 

Hoisington 

Holton 

Horton 

Howard 

Humboldt 

Iola 

Irving 

Jetmore 

Jewell City 

Junction City 

Kansas City 

Kensington 

Kingman 

Kinsley 

Kincaid 

Kiowa County 

(Greensburg) 
Kiowa 
Kirwin 
Labette County 

(Altamont) 
La Crosse 
La Cy*ne 
La Harpe 
Lakin 
Lane County 

(Dighton) 
Lansing 
Larned 
Latham 
Lebanon 
Leon 
LeBoy 
Lawrence 
Leavenworth 
Lewis 
Liberal 
Lincoln 
Lindsborg 
Linwood 
Little Biver 
Logan 
Longton 
Lost Springs 
Lucas 
Lyndon 
Lyons 
Macksville 
Madison 
Maize 
Maple Hill 
Manhattan 
Mankato 
Marion 
Marysville 
Marquette 
Minneapolis 
Montgomery County 

(Independence) 
McLouth 
Meade 

Medicine Lodge 
Melvern 
Meriden 
Mildred 
Moline 
Moran 
Morrill 
Mound City 



Requirements for Admission 



77 



Moundridge 

Mount Hope , 

Mulvane 

Museotah 

Natoma 

Nazareth Academy 

(Concordia) 
Neodesha 
Neosho Falls 
Neosho Rapids 
Ness City- 
Newton 
Bethel -Academy 

(Newton) 
Norton County 

(Norton) 
Nortonville 
Norwich 
Oakley 
Olathe 
Onaga 
Oneida 
Osage City 
Osawatomie 
Osborne 
Oskaloosa 
Oswego 
Ottawa 
Ottawa University Academy 

(Ottawa) 
Overbrook 
Oxford 
Paola 
Parson* 
Paxico 
Partridge 
Fawnee Rock 
Feabody 
Perry 

Phillipsburg 
Pittsburg 
Plainville 
Fleasantom 
F«mona 
Portia 
Fotwin 
Pratt 
Preston 
Protection 
^uenemo 



Reading 
Redfield 
Republic 
Richmond 
Rose Hill 
Rosedale 
Rossville 
Reno County 

(Nicker son) 
Russell 

Russell Springs 
Sabetha 
Salina 
Sacred Heart Academy 

(Salina) 
St. John 
Savonburg 
Scandia 
Scott County 

(Scott) 
Scranton 
Seneca 
Sedan ■ 
Sedgwick 
Severance 
Sharon 

Sharon Springs 
Sheridan County 

(Hoxie) 
Sherman County 

(Goodland) 
Smith Center 
Soldier 
Solomon 
Southwestern Acadwaay 

(Winfield) 
Spring Township 
Stark 
Spearville 
Spivey 
Stafford 
Sterling 
St. Marys 
St. Mary's Academy 

(Leavenworth) 
Stockton 
Sumner High School 

(Kansas City, Kan.) 
Sumner County 

(Wellington) 



Sumxnerfield 
Sylvan Grove 
Syracuse 
Tescott 
Thayer 
Thomas County 

(Colby) 
Tonganoxie 
Topeka 
Toronto 
Towanda 
Trego County 

(¥a Keeney) 
Troy 
Udall 

Valley Center 
Valley Falls 
Vermilion 
Viola 
Wakefield 
Waldo 
Walnut 
Walton 
Wamego 
Waterville 
Washburn Academy 

(Topeka) 
Washington 
Wathena 
Waverly 
Wellsville 
Wetmore 
Westmoreland 
White City 
White Water 
Whiting 
Wichita 
Winneld 
Wichita County 

(Leoti) 
Williamsburg 
Wilson 
Wilson High School 

(Kansas City, Kan.) 
Winchester 
Windom 
Woodston 
Yates Center 



78 Kansas State Agricultural College 



Requirements for Graduation 



For graduation, one must complete one of the four-year 
courses as shown elsewhere. These are believed to provide 
for the necessities of most students who seek an institution of 
this kind, and departures from the specified work are not en- 
couraged. Under special conditions, however, such College 
substitutions are allowed as the interests of the student de- 
mand. The total requirement, including military drill or physi- 
cal training, is about 220 term hours, or credits, the credit 
unit being one hour of recitation or lecture work, or two hours 
of laboratory work, a week, for one term of twelve weeks. 
As the allowance for laboratory work is liberal, and much of 
this is included in all courses, the total requirement named is 
not regarded as excessive. 

DEGREES 

The degree of bachelor of science (B. S.) is conferred upon 
those completing the four-year course in agriculture, mechani- 
cal engineering, electrical engineering, civil engineering, archi- 
tecture, industrial journalism, home economics, or general 
science. 

The degree of doctor of veterinary medicine (D. V. M.) is 
conferred upon those completing the four-year course in vet- 
erinary medicine. 

The degree of bachelor of agriculture is conferred upon stu- 
dents who have completed the freshman and sophomore work 
of the four-year course in agriculture, who have been con- 
spicuously successful in farming for a period of five years 
under the supervision of the Faculty of the College, and who 
have furnished the Faculty, through the Dean of the Division 
of Agriculture, acceptable reports of their work and progress. 

CERTIFICATES 

A certificate in agriculture is granted students completing 
the first two years of the four-year course in agriculture.* 

A certificate is granted to those completing either of the 
two-year short courses in agriculture. 

A certificate is granted to those completing the six-month 
housekeeper's course. 

* Under certain conditions and restrictions, students of mature years who can not 
spend fomr years in college, and -who may be applicants for the degree of bachelor of agri- 
culture or for the certificate in agriculture, may, on the completion of all of the work 
required in the freshman year, have the privilege of selecting such courses in advance of 
the sophomore year, under the advice and with the approval of the Dean of the Division 
of Agriculture, as may be especially adapted to their needs; but in no case can courses 
based on prerequisites not yet completed be undertaken. 



Requirements for Graduation 79 

ADVANCED DEGREES 

The degree of master of science is conferred upon graduates 
of this College and of other institutions after all the require- 
ments incident to the bestowal of the degree have been com- 
plied with. 

For graduates of this institution up to, and including, the 
class of 1916, the work for the degree of master of science 
consists of ninety-six credit units. The work of applicants 
who are graduates of other institutions is evaluated by a 
committee consisting of the chairman of the committee on 
advanced credit and of the dean of the division and the head 
of the department in which the major is to be taken, and the 
student is given proper standing. 

Forty-eight of the required ninety-six credit units are des- 
ignated as supplementary minors, and are to be derived from 
studies that are intended to strengthen the student's general 
preparation ; the remaining forty-eight are taken from studies 
of a special nature. Of the forty-eight credit units derived 
from special training, thirty-two are given to the major sub- 
ject and sixteen to the minors. The nature and distribution 
@f the major and minors are determined in each individual 
case by a committee, consisting of the dean of the division and 
the head of the department in which the major is taken. Of 
the forty-eight credit units derived from special training, 
thirty-two may be allowed for original research ; sixteen, desig- 
nated as minors, must be obtained from departments other 
than that in which the major is taken. A candidate may be 
allowed not to exceed six credit units for investigational work 
done in line of instruction or department investigations, either 
in this institution or elsewhere. Whether this is considered a 
part of the major or a part of the minor depends on the char- 
acter of the work. Candidates for the master's degree are re- 
quired to spend at least nine months in resident advanced 
study. 

Credit units due an honor student are applied on supple- 
mentary minors. In case a student nearing graduation has 
time, he may be permitted, by arrangement with the dean of 
the division and the head of the department in which he ex- 
pects to do the major work, to spend his extra time on studies 
which will count toward the degree of master of science. 

A thesis consisting of a clear statement of the investigation 
of some worthy original problem is required. The candidate 
is subjected to a rigid oral examination, covering both the 
general and special fields of his preparation, including his 
thesis, by a committee consisting of the dean of the division, 
the heads of the departments in which his major and regular 
minors have been taken, and the chairman of the standing 
committee on graduate study. 



80 Kansas State Agricultural College 

The full responsibility for the successful conduct of the 
graduate work is lodged in a representative standing commit- 
tee of the Faculty, consisting of five members selected by the 
President, and this committee has the right to pass on all 
courses offered, on all assignments taken out, and on the stand- 
ing of all graduate students. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 81 



General Information 



DUTIES AND PRIVILEGES 

Good conduct in general, such as becomes men and women 
everywhere, is expected of all students. Every possible aid 
and stimulus toward the development of sound and rational 
character, and toward the formation of high standards of 
personal honor and ideals of conduct, is given by the various 
Christian organizations of the College and the town. Every 
student is accordingly expected to render a good account of 
himself in the College community life. For those who are 
high-minded and reasonable, no other requirements need be 
expected. On the other hand, the demands of the College life 
leave no room for the idle or self-indulgent, for those who are 
too reckless to accept reasonable or wholesome restraint, or 
for those who are too careless or indifferent to take proper 
advantage of their opportunities. The College discipline is 
confined chiefly to sending away those whose conduct, after 
fair trial, makes their further attendance at the College un- 
profitable or inadvisable. 

Absences from class or laboratory periods must be accounted 
for to the instructor concerned. Permission for absence from 
College for one or more days must be secured in advance from 
the dean of the division in which the student is registered. 
Students can not honorably leave the College before the close 
of a term except by previous arrangement with the deans con- 
cerned. 

Opportunities for general scientific, literary, and forensic 
training are afforded, in addition to the College courses, by 
various literary and scientific societies and clubs. The Science 
Club, meeting monthly, admits to membership all instruc- 
tors and students interested in science. The College branch of 
the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, the Agricul- 
tural Association, and the Architectural Club admit to their 
membership young men interested in the fields indicated by 
their names. Of the strictly literary and debating clubs, the 
Alpha Beta and the Franklin are open to both sexes; the 
Ionian, the Eurodelphian, and the Browning are women's 
societies ; the Webster, the Hamilton, and the Athenian admit 
only young men to membership. In the School of Agriculture 
there are three literary societies, two for young men, the Lin- 
coln and the Representative, and one for young women, the 
Philomathian. 

At various times during the year, the College halls are 
opened for social, literary, musical, and dramatic entertain- 



82 Kansas State Agricultural College 

ments furnished by lecture courses, by the literary societies, 
by the Department of Music, by the Dramatic Club, by the 
Oratorical Association, and by other organizations of students 
and instructors. Addresses by prominent speakers, men of 
affairs, and persons prominent in scientific, educational, and 
social work are of frequent occurrence. 

EXPENSES 

Tuition is free. An incidental fee of three dollars a term is 
charged all students resident in Kansas. For nonresidents, a 
matriculation, or entrance, fee of ten dollars, and an incidental 
fee of ten dollars a term, are charged. A medical fee of fifty 
cents a term is also collected from each student, in return for 
which he receives medical treatment in case of sickness. Class 
instruction in music is free; for individual instruction a fee 
is required. In all laboratories students are required to pay 
for apparatus broken or lost and for supplies. No other fees 
are charged. Rooms and board are not furnished by the 
College. Table board in private families and at boarding 
houses varies from $3.25 to $4.50 a week, the average being 
about $3.75. Rooms are obtainable at from $5 to $10 a month 
when occupied by one person, $8 to $12 when occupied by two. 
The highest-priced accommodations include light, heat, and 
bath. 

The College Young Men's Christian Association offers ac- 
commodations in its building to a limited number of students, 
at prices from $10 to $13 a month "for rooms with modern con- 
veniences, and $3.25 a week for table board. As the number 
of rooms in the building is limited, applications should be made 
to the secretary of the association a year in advance. Board 
can usually be obtained at any time. 

Some students board themselves at less cost than the prices 
charged for table board, and unfurnished rooms may some- 
times be obtained very cheaply. Washing costs from 50 to 75 
cents a dozen pieces. Books cost on the average about $5 a 
term. 

Each young man who takes military drill is required to have 
a military uniform, costing about $15, and each young woman 
who takes physical training must have a physical-training suit, 
costing about $4. Ordinary expenditures, aside from clothing 
and traveling expenses, range from $175 to $300 a year. 

SELF-SUPPORT 

The courses of instruction are based upon the supposition 
that the student is here for study, and therefore a proper grasp 
of the subjects can not be obtained by the average student 
unless the greater part of his time is given to college work. 
Students of limited means are encouraged and aided in every 
possible way, but unless exceptionally strong, both mentally 



General Information 83 

and physically, such students are advised to take lighter work 
by extending their courses, in case they are obliged to give any 
considerable time to self-support. As a rule, a student should 
be prepared with means for at least a term, as some time is 
required in which to make acquaintances and to learn where 
suitable work may be obtained. 

There are various lines in which students may find employ- 
ment. The College itself employs labor to the extent of about 
$1200 a month, at rates varying from 15 to 20 cents an 
hour, according to the nature of the employment and the 
experience of the employee. Most of this labor is upon the 
College farm, in the orchards and gardens, in the shops and 
the printing-office, for the janitor, etc. Various departments 
utilize student help to a considerable extent during the vaca- 
tions. Students demonstrating exceptional efficiency, ability, 
and trustworthiness obtain limited employment in special 
duties about the College. Many students secure employment 
in various lines in the town, and some opportunity exists for 
obtaining board in exchange for work, with families either in 
town or in the neighboring country. Labor is universally re- 
spected in the College community, and the student who remains 
under the necessity of earning his way will find himself abso- 
lutely unhampered 1 by discouraging social conditions. False 
standards regarding physical work do not exist, and are not 
tolerated by the board of instruction or by the student body as 
a whole. Absolutely democratic standards prevail at the Col- 
lege, and students are judged on the basis of their personal 
worth and efficiency alone. 

Students are assisted to obtain employment by means of the 
employment bureaus maintained by the Young Men's Christian 
Association and by the Young Women's Christian Association 
of the College, with secretaries of which organizations corre- 
spondence is encouraged. New students are also met at the 
trains by committees from these two bodies, and are assisted 
in the finding of rooms, and in various other helpful ways. 

BUSINESS DIRECTIONS 

General information concerning the College may be obtained 
from the President or the Secretary. Financial matters are 
handled through the office of the Financial Secretary. 

Scientific and practical questions, and requests for special 
advice along lines in which the College and the Experiment 
Stations are prepared to give information, should be addressed 
to the heads of the departments concerned with the work in 
which the information is sought. 

Applications for farmers' institutes should be made as early 
in the season as possible to the Division of College Extension. 
Applications for the publications of the Agricultural Experi- 



84 Kansas State Agricultural College 

ment Station should be addressed: Director of the Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, Manhattan, Kan. 

Donations to the Library should be addressed to the Libra- 
rian, and donations to the Museum to the Curator of the 
Museum. 

STUDENT ASSEMBLY 

The Student Assembly is held from ten until ten-thirty 
o'clock on four mornings of each week. At this time, offices, 
class rooms and laboratories are closed and the students gather 
en masse in the College Auditorium. These assembly exercises 
consist of devotional services, music, and addresses. The 
devotional exercises are conducted by members of the Faculty, 
by resident ministers of the various denominations, or by 
prominent visitors. Excellent music is provided by the Col- 
lege Orchestra, by members of the Department of Music, and 
by available outside talent. In addition to the short, pointed 
addresses delivered by the President and by members of the 
Faculty, many prominent leaders of state and national reputa- 
tion are invited to address the assembly. Thus the Student As- 
sembly has become a center of true culture and enlightenment. 
Although attendance is not compulsory, it is common to see 
nearly two thousand enthusiastic students present during these 
exercises. 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

The official organ of the College is The Kansas Industrialist, 
published weekly by. the Department of Industrial Journalism, 
and printed at the College by the Department of Printing. Its 
pages are filled with articles of interest, with special reference 
to agriculture and the industries. Particular attention is paid 
to information concerning the work of the College, to investi- 
gations of the Experiment Stations, and to local and alumni 
news. The Kansas Industrialist will be sent to any address 
for seventy-five cents a year. The alumni may have The Kan- 
sas Industrialist free upon application. 

The Department of College Extension issues a monthly pub- 
lication entitled Agricultural Education, of special interest to 
institute members. The students of the College publish a semi- 
weekly periodical, The Kansas Aggie, formerly "The Students' 
Herald/ 9 in the interest of the students at large. This paper is 
edited and managed by a staff elected by students. A College 
annual, Royal Purple, is published each year by the senior 
class. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Examinations are held at the last regular recitation periods 
of the respective studies at the end of each term. Whether the 
examination is to extend over the last two periods or over one 
only is left to the decision of the individual instructor. Ex- 



General Information 85 

aminations to remove conditions are held on the next to the 
last Saturday of each term. A student who has received the 
grade C is entitled to take such special examination, provided 
the instructor be notified of the student's desire to take the 
examination not later than the Tuesday evening preceding the 
Saturday set for the examinations. A grade of P only is to 
be reported for a student who passes the examination to re- 
move a condition. A grade of F is to be reported for one who 
fails to pass. If a subject in which a student is conditioned is 
not passed at the first opportunity, the grade is changed from 
C to F. The instructor will report as incomplete (I) any stu- 
dent whose work, while satisfactory in quality, is lacking in 
the quantity required. The grade I in such cases is removed 
when the student completes the required quantity of work in a 
satisfactory manner. With the consent of the head of the de- 
partment, incomplete work may be made up outside of class, 
but if it is not made up by the last Saturday of the first term 
during which the student is in attendance following the term in 
which the deficiency occurred, the student's grade is changed 
from I to F, and he is required to make up the work by repeat- 
ing it in a regular class. Incomplete work made up is to be re- 
ported as P. 

Permission for examination in subjects not taken in class 
must be obtained, on recommendation of the professor in 
charge, from the dean of the division in which the student is 
assigned, at least two months before the examination is held. 
Permission to take such examination is not granted unless the 
preparation for it is made under an approved tutor. All such 
examinations are under the immediate supervision of the pro- 
fessor in whose department the subject falls. 

GRADES 

Students' grades are based upon the completed work of a 
term, and are designated by letters having the following sig- 
nification and rank : 

E, excellent; G, good; P, passed; C, conditioned; I, incomplete (applied 
to all work which is satisfactory as to quality, but not as to quantity) ; P, 
failed. 

Any student who receives a grade of E for the term, in 
any subject, and who is charged with not to exceed six absences 
for all causes from the class in such subject during the term, 
may be excused from the final examination in that subject, at 
the discretion of the instructor; provided, however, that in- 
structors are to announce such exemption lists in their re- 
spective subjects not earlier than the last session of the class 
preceding the final examinations. 

Examinations to remove conditions are reported simply as 
P (passed) or F (failed), and such examinations not taken, 
or taken and not passed, are recorded as F (failed) . 



86 Kansas State Agricultural College 

PENALTIES 

A student who at the end of the term receives grades below 
passing in fifty per cent or more of the work to which he is as- 
signed is required to leave college for at least one term unless 
there are sufficiently extenuating circumstances, in which case 
his dean may suspend the rule and allow an assignment to 
twelve credit units of work. 

Any student who, at the end of a term, receives grades below 
passing in twenty-five per cent of his assigned work is al- 
lowed not more than seventy-five per cent of regular work the 
next term. 

Any student who is found to be persistently inattentive to 
study is at once temporarily suspended by his dean, and re- 
ported to the President for permanent suspension. 

HONORS 

In each of the divisions of the College "junior honors" are 
awarded at Commencement to not more than five per cent of 
the junior class having the highest standing up to the close of 
the junior year. 

In a similar manner "senior honors" are awarded to not ex- 
ceeding five per cent of the senior class having the highest 
standing to the close of the senior year. 

Any student achieving senior honors receives two credit 
units toward the master's degree; a student achieving both 
junior and senior honors receives six credit units toward the 
master's degree. 

The following is the system of awarding honor points : The 
grades received by the student carry plus and minus "points" 
as follows : 

Grade E (excellent) carries + 2 points. 

Grade G (good) carries -f- 1 point. 

Grade P (passed) carries point. 

Grade C (conditioned) carries — 1 point. 

Grade F (failed) carries — 2 points. 

When grade C (conditioned) is subsequently changed by 
the examination to remove a condition to grade P (passed) or 
grade F (failed) the points are changed accordingly. 

In the estimation of honor points, the number of points at- 
tached to any given grade is multiplied by the number of hours 
a week required in the subject. In the case of a subject con- 
sisting wholly or in part of shop practice or laboratory work, 
one-half the number of hours required in such shop practice or 
laboratory work is taken in computing the multiplying f actor. 

The award of honors is to those achieving the highest alge- 
braic sum of honor points, according to the foregoing schedule, 
and under the limitations provided above. 



General Information 87 

CEEDITS FOR EXTRA WORK 

Activities connected with the College, but not provided for 
by any of the courses of study, either as required subjects or as 
electives, are designated as extra subjects. 

No credit is given for extra work of any kind unless the 
student is regularly assigned to it in accordance with the gen- 
eral rules governing assignments, and it is done under the 
constant supervision of a College officer, who sees that a proper 
standard is maintained and reports a grade for record. 

No student may be assigned to extra work for credit except 
upon the written recommendation of the instructor in charge of 
the work. This recommendation is filed in the office of the stu- 
dent's dean, and is effective until revoked. 

Credits earned for extra work may be counted as part or all 
of the electives in any of the College courses. In courses that 
do not include electives, credits for extra work are available 
only as substitutions for required work, and must be approved 
in the regular way before becoming effective. A total of not 
more than twelve credit units may be allowed a student for 
extra work, and not more than two credits may be obtained in 
any one term. 

The credit units that may be allowed for extra work are as 
follows : 

Subject. Per term. Total. 

Physical training 1 6 

Military drill (unpaid) 1 6 

Orchestra 1 6 

Band 1 6 

Glee Club 1 6 

Debate 2 6 

Oratorical contest 2 4 

Kansas Aggie Journalism 1 6 

CLASSES 

The minimum numbers for which classes are organized are 
as follows : 

School of Agriculture 18 

Freshmen or Sophomores 12 

Juniors or Seniors 7 

This rule is varied only by special permission of the Board 
of Administration. 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



School of Agriculture 



The School of Agriculture is organized to meet the needs of 
young men and young women of Kansas who may need in- 
struction more closely identified with the life of the farm, 
home and shop than that provided by the high schools of the 
State. It is also intended to meet the needs of those men and 
women who find themselves for any cause unable to complete 
an extensive course of collegiate instruction, yet who feel the 
necessity of a practical training for their activities in life. 
More than one-half of the student's time in the school will be 
spent in the laboratories and in contact with the real objects 
of his future work. An element of culture and general infor- 
mation is provided for in three years of English for each 
course, and in work in history, economics, citizenship, physics, 
and chemistry. 

The School of Agriculture is not a school preparatory to 
the College. Its sole purpose is to fit men and women for life 
in the open country, and to make country life more attractive ; 
to make the workshop more efficient;. in short, to dignify and 
to improve industrial life. It is not established to entice 
students away from the high school. It is for those of every 
walk in life who wish a larger view and greater skill in doing 
the world's work. 

All the resources of the College are at the disposal of the 
School of Agriculture. Its students have every advantage 
possessed by students in the College. 

THE COURSE OF STUDY 

The course in agriculture emphasizes the growing of crops 
and the raising of live stock. A minimum of theory and a 
maximum of practical work will bring the student into close 
contact with the actual conditions of farm life. 

The course in domestic science emphasizes the care of the 
home. Home decoration, home sanitation, cookery and sewing 
receive careful attention. 

The course in mechanic arts leads to a trade. It is designed 
to shorten the time of apprenticeship and to prepare the way 
for skilled workmanship in shop or factory. The great amount 
of time spent in the shops should easily lead to skill and 
efficiency in subsequent work. 



School of Agriculture 89 

ADMISSION 

Students who are fourteen years of age or older and who 
have completed the eighth grade of the public schools are 
admitted without examination. Students who have not com- 
pleted the eighth grade are examined in arithmetic, United 
States history, English grammar, geography, reading, and 
spelling. Students who have done work in the public high 
schools receive credit for the work done. Maturity in years 
and practical experience are given due consideration, but stu- 
dents should not consider these qualifications alone sufficient 
to admit them. Wherever there is question about a student's 
qualifications for entering, he should correspond with the 
Principal of the School of Agriculture before coming. 

TIME OF OPENING 

All candidates for admission to the School of Agriculture 
should present themselves for registration at the College Sep- 
tember 14 to 17, inclusive. The Principal of the School of 
Agriculture is charged with the execution of all College and 
Faculty rules relating to the enrollment of students in classes 
and 'their choice of studies. 

It is greatly to the advantage of the prospective student to 
see to it that his certificate of graduation, properly filled out, 
be sent to the College as soon as possible after graduation. 
A permit to register will then be sent him by the Eegistrar in 
advance of his coming in September ; this will greatly facilitate 
the work of entrance. The student will present this permit 
at the registration room in Nichols Gymnasium and will not 
be compelled to wait his turn to meet the committee on ad- 
mission. 

Upon registration each student receives a certificate of his 
standing, which he presents to the Principal of the school, who 
is charged with the duty of enrolling students in classes, 
selecting and arranging subjects, and assigning hours. 

GRADES AND FAILURES 

Examinations are held at stated periods and at such other 
times as the Faculty ,may provide. Absence from examina- 
tion, or ten or more unexcused absences from class periods, 
sever a student's connection with the institution, which con- 
nection can be renewed only through the action of the Prin- 
cipal of the school. Any withdrawal from school or class 
must be authorized by the Principal; otherwise, continued 
absence is construed as failure. Parents or guardians are 
furnished a copy of the record of the student's work at the 
close of any term if they so desire. 



90 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



Course in Agriculture 

(School of Agriculture.) 

The Arabic numeral immediately following the name of a subject indicates the number 
of credits, while the numerals in parentheses indicate the number of hours a week of 
recitation and of laboratory, respectively. 



FALL 

Industrial Arithmetic A 
4 (4-0) 

General Biology I 

4 (2-4) 
Stock Judging I 

3 (0-6) 
Farm Machinery 

3 (1-4) 
English Readings 

4 (4-0) 
Military Drill or 
Physical Training 
Music* 



EL Chemistry I 

4 (3-2) 
English History 

4 (4-0) 
English Classics I 

4 (4-0) 
Gardening I 

3 (2-2) 
Stock Judging II 

3 (0-6) 
Physical Training 
Music* 



Forage Crops 

3 (2-2) 
Physics A-I 

4 (3-2) 

Diseases of Farm Animals 

3 (3-0) 
Gas and Oil Engines I 

3 (1-4) or 
Grain Marketing 

3 (2-2) 
Theme Writing 

4 (4-0) 



FIRST YEAR 

WINTER 

Algebra 

4 (4-0) 
General Biology II 

4 (2-4) 
Beginning Poultry 

3 (2-2) 
Farm Carpentry 

3 (1-4) 

Grammar and Composition 

4 (4-0) 
Military Drill or 
Physical Training 
Music* 

**SECOND YEAR 

EL Chemistry II 

4 (3-2) 
American History 

4 (4-0) 
Elementary Composition II 

4 (4-0) 
Rural Economics 

3 (3-0) 
Breeds and Breeding 

3 (3-0) 
Physical Training 
Music* 

THIRD YEAR 

Farm Management and 

Farm Accounts 4 (3-2) 
Physics A-II 

4 (3-2) 

Live Stock Production 

3 (3-0) 
Agricultural Bacteriology 

4 (3-2) 

Handling and Curing Meats 

3 (1-4) or 
Farm Writing 

3 (2-2) or 
Farm Buildings 

3 (0-6) 



SPRING 

Applied Geometry 

4 (4-0) 
General Biology III 

4 (2-4) 
Grain Crops 

4 (3-2) 
Farm Blacksmithing 

3 (1-4) 
Elementary Composition I 

4 (4-0) 
Military Drill or 
Physical Training 
Music* 



El. Agricultural Chemistry 

4 (3-2) 
Civics 

4 (4-0) 
Elementary Rhetoric 

4 (4-0) 
Farm Insects 

3 (3-0) 
Feeds and Feeding 

3 (3-0) 
Physical Training 
Music* 



Soils and Fertilizers 

4 (3-2) 
Physics A-III 

4 (3-2) 
Dairy 

3 (2-2) 
Conference English 

4 (4-0) 

Forestry and Ornamental 

Gardening 3 (2-2) or 
Irrigation and Drainage 
3 (1-4) 



* Elective. 

** See page 94 for announcement of summer project or demonstration work for credits 



School of Agriculture 



91 



Course in Mechanic Arts 

(School of Agbictti/tuke.) 

The Arabic numeral immediately folio-wing the name of a subject indicates the number 
of credits, while the numerals in parentheses indicate the number of hours a week of 
recitation and of laboratory, respectively. 



FALL 

English Readings 

4 (4-0) 
Algebra I 

4 (4-0) 
European History I 

4 (4-0) 
Free-hand Drawing 

3 (0-6) 
Woodwork I 

4 (1-6) 
Vocational Guidance I 

1 (1-0) 
Military Drill or 
Physical Training 



English Classics I 

4 (4-0) 
Plane Geometry I 

4 (4-0) 
Physics M-I 

4 (3-2) 
Shop Drawing I 

3 (1-4) 
Trade Practice* 

6 (-) 
Physical Training 



Industrial History 

4 (4-0) 
Algebra IV 

4 (4-0) 
Trade Practice* 

12 (-) 



FIRST YEAR 

WINTER 

Grammar and Composition 

4 (4-0) 
Algebra II 

4 (4-0) 
European History II 

4 (4-0) 
Object Drawing 

3 (0-6) 
Elementary Foundry 

4 (1-6) 
Vocational Guidance II 

1 d-0) 
Military Drill or 
Physical Training 

SECOND YEAR 

Elementary Composition II 

4 (4-0) 
Plane Geometry II 

4 (4-0) 
Physics M-II 

4 (3-2) 
Shop Drawing II 

3 (1-4) 
Trade Practice* 

Physical Training 

**THIRD YEAR 

Civics 

4 (4-0) 
Applied Mathematics 

4 (4-0) 

Trade Practice* 

12 (-) 



SPRING 

Elementary Composition I 

4 (4-0) 
Algebra III 

4 (4-0) 
American History 

4 (4-0) 
Geometrical Drawing 

3 <-) 
EL Blacksmithing I 

3 (1-4) 
Trade Practice* 

3 (0-6) 
Military Drill or 
Physical Training 



Elementary Rhetoric 

4 (4-0) 
Solid Geometry 

4 (4-0) 
Physics M-III 

4 (3-2) 
Shop Drawing III 

3 (1-4) 
Trade Practice* 

6<-) 
Physical Training 



Economics 

4 (4-0) 
Conference English 

4 (4-0) 
Trade Practice* 

12 (-) 



* Trade Practice may be elected in one of the following trades : Blacksmithing, Car- 
pentry, Cement and Concrete Construction, Gas Engines, Steam Engines and Boilers, 
Traction Engines. Details of the Trade Practice work for each course will be found on 
page 107 and following. 

** No Trade Practice work listed in the third year will be offered during the college 
year 1914-1915. 



92 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



Course in Home Economics 

(School of Agbicttlttjbe.) 

The Arabic numeral immediately following the name of a subject indicates the number 
of credits, while the numerals in parentheses indicate the number of hours a week of 
recitation and of laboratory, respectively. 



FALL 

English Headings 

4 (4-0) 
Industrial Arithmetic W 

4 (4-0) 
Physiology and Hygiene 

4 (4-0) 
Color and Design I 

3 (0-6) 
Sewing I 

2 (0-4) 
Physical Training 
Music* 



FIRST YEAR 

WINTER 

Grammar and Composition 

4 (4-0) 
Algebra 

4 (4-0) 
Home Sanitation 

4 (4-0) 
Color and Design II 

3 (0-6) 
Sewing II 

2 (0-4) 
Physical Training 
Music* 



SPRING 

Elementary Composition I 

4 (4-0) 
Applied Geometry 

4 (4-0) 
Home Management 

4 (4-0) 
Home Decoration 

4 (0-8) 
Sewing III 

2 (0-4) 
Physical Training 
Music* 



English Classics I 

4 (4-0) 
English History 

4 (4-0) 
Physics H-I 

4 (3-2) 
Household Entomology 

2 (2-0) 
Cooking I 

2 (0-4) 
Sewing IV 

2 (0-4) 
Physical Training 
Music* 



SECOND YEAR 

Elementary Composition II 

4 (4-0) 
American History 

4 (4-0) 
Physics H-II 

4 (3-2) 
EI. of Poultry Keeping 

2 (2-0) 
Cooking II 

2 (0-4) 
Shirt-waist Suit 

2 (0-4) 
Physical Training 
Music* 



Elementary Rhetoric 

4 (4-0) 
Civics 

4 (4-0) 
Physics H-III 

4 (3-2) 
Dairying 

2 (0-4) 
Cooking III 

2 (0-4) 
Dressmaking 

2 (0-4) 
Physical Training 
Music* 



Theme Writing 

4 (4-0) 
Elementary Chemistry I 

4 (3-2) 
Economics 

4 (4-0) 
Cooking IV 

2 (0-4) 
Textiles 

2 (2-0) 
Art Needlework 

2 (0-4) 
Physical Training* 
Music* 



THIRD YEAR 

Practice Writing 

4 (4-0) 
Elementary Chemistry II 

4 (3-2) 
Household Bacteriology 

4 (3-2) 
Cooking Y 

2 (0-4) 
Costume Design 

2 (0-4) 
Millinery 

2 (0-4) 
Physical Training* 
Music* 



English. Classics II 

4 (4-0) 
El. Household Chemistry 

4 (3-2) 
Gardening I 

3 (2-2) 
Cooking VI 

2 (0-4) 
Advanced Dressmaking 

2 (0-4) 
Food Production 

3 (3-0) 
Physical Training* 
Music* 



* Elective. 



School of Agriculture 93 



Agricultural Courses 



AGRONOMY 

1. — Farm Machinery. First year, fall term. Class work, one hour; 
laboratory, four hours. Three credits. 

In this course the student is taught in the class room the mechanical 
principles of the different types of farm machinery, and in the laboratory 
and the field is taught to adjust and operate the machines properly. In- 
struction is also given in fence construction, rope splicing, and cement 
work. 

2. — Grain Crops. First year, spring term. Class work, three hours; 
laboratory, two hours. Four credits. 

This course consists of a study of grain-crop production. The factors 
that affect the yield of grain crops are given the greatest consideration. 
These factors include crop adaptation, methods of planting, methods of 
cultivation, and methods of harvesting. In order that such study may be 
of the greatest value, the structure of the plants and methods of improve- 
ment are considered. The greatest emphasis is placed upon the economic 
production of the crops. Eight grain crops are included in the study, 
being given consideration in accordance with their importance in the 
State. 

3. — Forage Crops. Third year, fall term. Class work, two hours; 
laboratory, two hours. Three credits. 

This course takes up the culture, adaptation, distribution and uses of 
crops for pasture, hay, roughage, silage, soiling; cover crops; green 
manure crops. The use of these crops for the maintenance of soil fertil- 
ity, together with their importance in systems of cropping and rotation, 
is given special emphasis. The seed production of grasses, legumes, 
annuals and forage crops is also studied. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work of this course is planned to give the 
student training in the identification of seeds and plants studied in the 
class. A study is made of the quality, mixtures and adulteration of seeds. 
Prerequisites : Grain Crops ; General Biology III. 

4. — Farm Management and Farm Accounts. Third year, winter 
term. Class work, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. 

The purpose of this course is to correlate in a definite manner the 
information relating to farming that the student has accumulated in 
other agricultural courses. The course involves a study of the selection 
of farms, plans and arrangement of fields and farm buildings, and the 
investment and proper distribution of capital in the farming business. 
The relation of live-stock farming to crop farming, and the most profit- 
able combinations of these, together with their effect upon soil fertility 
and the upbuilding of the. farm, are considered. Farm accounts and rec- 
ords are studied, and special emphasis is given to systems of account 
keeping that are accurate, simple, and applicable to farm conditions. 
Prerequisites: Forage Crops; Live Stock III. 

5.— Soils and Fertilizers. Third year, spring term. Class work, 
three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. 

This course involves discussion of depth of plowing for different crops, 
the conservation of moisture, and the handling of soils to prevent blow- 
ing. This course also involves a study of the care and use of barnyard 
manure, of green manuring crops, and of commercial fertilizers. Pre- 
requisites: Agricultural Chemistry; Forage Crops. 



94 Kansas State Agricultural College 

6. — Irrigation and Drainage. Third year, spring term. Class work, 
one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. 

This course offers an opportunity for students who are interested in 
either irrigation or drainage to become familiar with the fundamental 
principles underlying both these practices. Practical work is given in 
the field in the use of the level, in digging drainage ditches, in laying tile, 
and in studying drainage systems in operation on the College farm and 
adjoining farms. 

7. — Home Project or Demonstration Work. Summer vacations. 
Maximum credits, eight; four each vacation. 

Students in the course in agriculture of the School of Agriculture may, 
upon recommendation of the Principal, earn not to exceed four credits 
during each of the two summer vacations by doing project or demonstra- 
tion work on the home farm. This work must be arranged for with the 
head of the department in charge of the work of the College, and must be 
approved by the Dean of the Division of Agriculture. The work must in- 
clude a detailed plan of the project, a report of work done, and a final 
report of results. The amount of credit given for a project shall be de- 
termined by the head of the department, but shall in no case exceed four 
credit hours for the work of one summer. 

DAIRYING 

1. — Dairy Cows. Second year, term. Laboratory, six hours. 
This course is given as a part of Stock Judging II. Two weeks is 
devoted to the judging of dairy cattle. 

2. — Dairy. Third year, spring term. Lectures, two hours ; laboratory, 
two hours. Three credits. 

This course includes lectures on milk and its composition, Babcock 
testing, separation, churning, and feeding the dairy herd. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work comprises the operation of the 
Babcock test, testing separators, churning, and judging dairy cattle. 

3. — Dairying. Second year, spring term. Laboratory, four hours. 
Two credits. 

Lectures are given at different times during the course, which includes 
a study of the composition and the secretion of milk, the Babcock test, 
the principles of separation, the care of milk and cream, cream ripening, 
butter making, and fancy cheese making. 

Laboratory, — This work includes testing milk and cream by the Bab- 
cock test, separating milk, churning, and fancy cheese making. 

FORESTRY 

1. — Forestry and Ornamental Gardening. Lectures, two hours; 
laboratory, two hours. Three credits. Optional in the spring term of the 
third year of the course in agriculture. 

This course covers the principles and methods involved in tree plant- 
ing, both for the wood-lot and for decorative purposes. The laboratory 
work consists in making plans for planting home grounds. 

HORTICULTURE 

1. — Gardening L Lectures, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Three 
credits. Required in the home economics and agricultural courses. 

This course will consist of a study of the principles and practices 
involved in the care and cultivation of market and home gardens. 



School of Agriculture 95 

LIVE STOCK 

1. — Stock Judging I. First year, fall term. Laboratory, six hours. 
Three credits. 

This course consists in score-card practice in judging horses, cattle, 
sheep and swine, in which the students become familiar with the general 
points to be observed in judging live stock. Text, Craig's Live-stock 
Judging. 

2. — Stock Judging II. Second year, fall term. Laboratory, six hours. 
Three credits. 

This course consists of the study of the breeding and market types of 
horses, cattle, sheep and swine. Two weeks of this time is given to the 
study of dairy cattle, presented by the Department of Dairy Husbandry. 

3. — Breeds and Breeding. Second year, winter term. Class work, 
three hours. Three credits. 

This course consists of the study of pure-bred horses, cattle, sheep and 
swine, and the methods practiced by the best breeders. It also embraces 
the study of the general principles of breeding, such as variation and 
heredity. Text, Marshall's Breeding Farm Animals. 

4. — Feeds and Feeding. Second year, spring term. Class work, three 
hours. Three credits. 

This course involves the study of the comparison and usefulness of 
various feeds for growing and fattening all classes of farm animals. 
Text, Henry's Feeds and Feeding. 

5. — Live-stock Production. Third year, winter term. Class work, 
three hours. Three credits. 

This course consists of a study of successful and economical methods 
of growing and finishing cattle, sheep and hogs for market purposes, as 
well as the breeding of both market and pure-bred animals. 

6. — Handling and Curing Meat. Optional course, third year, winter 
term. Class work, one hour ; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. 

This course consists of a study of methods of slaughtering and dress- 
ing animals, cutting up carcasses into wholesale and retail cuts, and 
curing meat for farm use. Laboratory work is offered in killing small 
animals. Prerequisite: Breeds and Breeding. 

MILLING INDUSTEY 

1. — Grain Marketing. Third year, fall term. Class work, two hours ; 
laboratory, two hours. Three credits. 

In this course are studied methods of harvesting, handling and storing 
of grain, together with the marketing of surplus grain from the farm. 
This involves methods of selling, shipping and grading grain; organiza- 
tion of grain inspection departments, with their merits and defects; the 
principal grain markets, with receipts, shipments, and grain consumed. 
The by-products resulting from the manufacture of food products 
from grain will be studied with regard to their feeding value and com- 
parative cost. 

POULTRY 

1. — Beginning Poultry. First year, winter term. Offered in the 
course in agriculture. Recitation, two hours; laboratory, two hours. 
Three credits. • 

This course takes up a discussion of the various operations that go to 
make up the art of poultry-keeping. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory study will include work in dressing, pack- 
ing, and caponizing. 



96 Kansas State Agricultural College 

2.— Elements of Poultry-keeping. Second year, winter term. Of- 
fered in the course in home economics. Recitation, two hours. Two 
credits. 

This course is a duplicate of Poultry 1, except that no laboratory work 
is required. 

VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Diseases op Farm Animals. Third year, fall term. Class work, 
three hours. Three credits. 

This course is intended to teach the student the recognition of disease, 
the principles involved in the preservation of health, and the application 
of first aid in disease or accident among farm animals. The various 
diseases resulting from the use of spoiled foods or the improper or 
injudicious use of good foods are discussed: The value of food, care 
and nursing of the sick animal is thoroughly'impressed upon the student. 
The common infectious diseases and the means for their prevention and 
eradication are also considered. Text, Burkett's Farmer's Veterinarian. 



General Science Courses 

BACTERIOLOGY 

1. — Agricultural Bacteriology. Third year, winter term. Lectures, 
three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required in the course 
in agriculture. 

An elementary course in the principles of bacteriology is here offered, 
taking up bacteriological problems from an entirely practical standpoint. 
The course is offered in order to give the student a reading knowledge 
of the sources and modes of infection; the relation of bacteriology to 
dairying and to soils and crop production; general sanitation; fermenta- 
tions, etc. 

Laboratory. — General laboratory manipulations; normal and abnormal 
fermentations of milk and milk products; quantitative study of bacteria 
in the soil; a limited study of fermentations, of pathogenic bacteria, of 
sewage pollution of water, etc., comprise the laboratory work. 

2. — Household Bacteriology. Third year, winter term. Lectures, 
three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. 

This course includes a general survey of the science of bacteriology 
as applied to the home. It includes a discussion of microorganisms as 
related to air, water, foods, general sanitation, fermentations, etc. An 
attempt is made to present the subject in as simple a manner as possible. 
The course is offered in the hope of giving the student a general under- 
standing of the fundamentals, and a reading knowledge of the science. 

Laboratory. — Various microscopic forms of importance in fermenta- 
tions; preservation and spoilage of foods; the influence of various 
preservatives upon microorganisms common in the home; methods of 
sterilization and of pasteurization; the handling of infectious material, 
etc., are the subjects taken up in the laboratory work. 

BIOLOGY 

1. — General Biology I. First year, fall term. Class work, two hours; 
laboratory, four hours. Four credits. 

This course involves an elementary study of the biology of plants, in- 
cluding the simpler facts of their structure and of their physiology. The 
life history of a seed plant is followed from the germination of the seed 
to maturity, and the structure and work of the root, stem and leaf sys- 
tems is studied in some detail. The biology of the flower and its peculiar 



School of Agriculture 97 

adaptations to insect- or wind-pollination is emphasized, as well as the 
manner in which seeds and fruits are distributed. Throughout the 
course emphasis is laid on the relations of plants to light, air, water, and 
soil, and on the relation between the biology of plants in agricultural 
practice. 

2. — General Biology II. First year, winter term. Class work, two 
hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. 

This course is intended to teach the student the elementary principles 
of physiology and also the gross structure or anatomy of the body. Com- 
parisons are made with the domestic animals as often as possible. The 
lectures are supplemented by the use of models and dissections by the in- 
structor when necessary. There is an abundance of apparatus for demon- 
strating purposes, and demonstrations are made frequently in order to 
make the course interesting and instructive. 

3. — General Biology III. First year, spring term. Class work, two 
hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. 

This course deals with the natural history of animals. The laboratory 
work consists of one four-hour period a week. This work is carried on 
for the most part out of doors. The ponds and streams, meadows and 
woodlands are visited and the, animals studied in their relation to each 
other and to their environments. Numbers of animals are brought to the 
laboratory, where they are kept in vivaria and such study given them as 
is not permitted out in the field. The two hours of class work are de- 
voted to resumes of the field and laboratory work and to general matters 
of animal biology. 

CHEMISTRY 

1. — Elementary Chemistry I. Lectures and recitations, three hours; 
laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required in the courses in agricul- 
ture and home economics. Prerequisite: Elementary Physics. 

The work this term is an elementary study of the general principles 
of chemistry, using the elements oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, chlorine, 
and carbon, and their most important compounds, as its basis. So far as 
possible, illustrations are drawn from practical life on the farm and in 
the home. The laboratory work is designed to give the student some 
knowledge of the essential features of chemical change, as well as to 
familiarize him with some of the more important elements and chemical 
compounds. Textbook, McPherson and Henderson's Elementary Study of 
Chemistry. 

2. — Elementary Chemistry II. Lectures and recitations, three hours ; 
laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required in the courses in agri- 
culture and home economics. Prerequisite: Elementary Chemistry I. 

The work this term is a continuation of that begun in Elementary 
Chemistry I. Sulphur and phosphorus and to a slight extent other non- 
metals and their compounds are studied. This work is followed by some 
study of the most important metals and their compounds. The practical 
aspects of the subject are emphasized throughout. Textbook, McPherson 
and Henderson's Elementary Study of Chemistry. 

3. — Elementary Household Chemistry. Lectures and recitations, 
three hours; laboratory, two hour's. Four credits. Required in the course 
in home economics. Prerequisite: Elementary Chemistry II. 

In the work of this term, chemistry is studied in its more direct ap- 
plication to the household. The course includes not only some special ap- 
plications of inorganic chemistry, but simple organic chemistry, especially 
in its relation to foods. The laboratory work is an application of chem- 
istry to various household problems touching water, foods, textiles, and 
utensils. Textbook, Snyder's Chemistry of Plant and Animal Life. 



98 Kansas State Agricultural College 

4. — Elementary Agricultural Chemistry. Lectures and recitations, 
three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required in the course 
in Agriculture. Prerequisite: Elementary Chemistry II. 

The general principles of chemistry are presented as applicable on the 
farm in relation to soils, fertilizers, dairy products, feeds, water, etc. 
The laboratory work is made as practical as possible. Textbook, Snyder's 
Chemistry of Plant and Animal Life. 

ECONOMICS 

1. — Rural Economics. Second year, winter term. Class work, three 
hours. Three credits. Required in the course in agriculture. 

This course is an introductory study of economic principles as they 
apply to the business of farming. Special attention is given to co- 
operation in its relation to rural credit, production, and exchange. Special 
emphasis is placed on the details of distribution and marketing of the 
products of the farm and to the purchase of the supplies of the family. 
Instruction is based on a text, bulletins, and assigned library readings. 

2. — Economics. Third year, fall or spring term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Required in the courses in home economics and 
mechanic arts. 

This course is a study of fundamental principles underlying man's 
wealth-getting and wealth-using activities, and their application to con- 
ditions and problems of the industries of to-day. Instruction is based on 
a text, assigned readings, and reports. 

ENGLISH 

1. — English Readings. First year, fall term. Class work, four 
hours. Four hours credit. Required of all students. 

In this course a careful study is made of interesting standard literary 
selections. Class readings, class discussions, written sketches, abstracts, 
and outlines, and training in the practical use of the dictionary, give 
the student the opportunity to grow in the power to think clearly and to 
express himself accurately. This course is enriched by interesting out- 
side readings. 

2. — Grammar and Composition. First year, winter term. Class 
work, four hours. Four hours credit. Required of all students. Pre- 
requisite: English Readings. 

This course is a review of the essentials of the English language. 
Short, interesting selections are studied definitely and interpreted clearly. 
The correct thought-interpretation of ordinary English sentences is taught 
in connection with the selections read and studied. The aim is to give 
little theory and much practice in the intelligent use of the language. 

3. — Elementary Composition I. First year, spring term. Class 
work, four hours. Four hours credit. Required of all students. Pre- 
requisite: Grammar and Composition. 

The work of this term includes: instruction in the elementary prin- 
ciples of composition; advanced drill in the use of the dictionary; the 
study of words and sentences; special drills in punctuation; exercises 
in letter writing; drills in abstracting; and the writing of short themes. 
Special personal help is given the student at consultation hours. 

4. — English Classics I. Second year, fall term. Class work, four 
hours. Four hours credit. Required of all students. Prerequisite: 
Elementary Composition I. 

The work of this course is centered in the study of selected Mterary 
masterpieces. The careful preparation of outlines, sketches, paraphrases, 
and abstracts, class readings, general class discussions, and special exer- 
cises in interpreting character and life, are essentials of the term's work. 



School of Agriculture 99 

5. — Elementary Composition II. Second year, winter term. Class 
work, four hours. Four hours credit. Required of all students. Pre- 
requisite: English Classics I. 

This course is a continuation of Elementary Composition I. The 
course opens with a brief review of the sentence as the grammatical 
unit of thought-expression, and continues with a thorough study of the 
paragraph as the rhetorical unit. Special emphasis is placed upon 
practical writing on topics of keenest interest to the pupil. 

6. — Elementary Rhetoric. Second year, spring term. Class work, 
four hours. Four hours credit. Required of all students. Prerequisite: 
Elementary Composition II. 

This course includes a general survey of description, narration, ex- 
position, and argumentation, with special emphasis placed upon clear, 
interesting, effective oral and written expression. Special exercises in 
punctuation, short drills in proofreading, drills in outlining, abstracting, 
oral discussions, and elementary debating, are also emphasized in this 
course. 

7. — Theme Writing. Third year, fall term. Class work, four hours. 
Four hours credit. Required of all students in the courses in agriculture 
and home economics. Prerequisite: Elementary Rhetoric. 

Special emphasis is placed upon exposition, or clear-cut explanation. 
Pupils are trained to tell accurately and interestingly how things are 
done in various fields of human activity. This course is conducted with 
the idea of assisting the student to acquire the habit of clear, accurate 
thought-getting and thought-expression in all of his technical work. 

8. — Practice Writing. Third year, winter term. Class work, four 
hours. Four hours credit. Required of students in the course in home 
economics. Prerequisite: Theme writing. 

This course includes a short review of practical exposition, a thorough 
study of the principles of narration, and the analysis and writing of 
narrative paragraphs and short stories. Short stories of the farm and 
home, stories of country life, and other human-interest stories, are re- 
quired. 

9. — English Classics II. Third year, spring term. Class work, four 
hours. Four hours credit. Required of students in the course in home 
economics. Prerequisite: Practice Writing. 

This course is designed to afford an additional drill and study in the 
cultural side of literature and language. The student is given a bird's- 
eye view of the field of literature, with an intensive study of repre- 
sentative classics from Shakespeare, Tennyson, and other authors. This 
intensive study of representative classics is broadened and enriched by 
well-selected supplementary reading. 

10. — Conference English. Third year, spring term. Class work, 
four hours. Four hours credit. Required of all students in the courses 
in agriculture and mechanic arts. Prerequisite: Theme Writing. 

This course includes a thorough review of the essentials of English. 
Special emphasis is placed upon the ability to write and to tell accurately 
the thought to be conveyed. This course requires of all students daily 
practice in oral and written English, and includes regular conferences 
and consultations with students on matters concerning their greatest 
needs in the use of language. The course is designed with special refer- 
ence to the needs of students in engineering and in agriculture. 



100 Kansas State Agricultural College 

ENTOMOLOGY 

1. — Farm Insects. Second year, spring term. Class work, three 
hours. Three credits. Required in the course in agriculture. Pre- 
requisite: General Biology. 

This is a study of the elementary anatomy, structure and physiology 
of insects, complete enough to give a clear understanding of the general 
structure of insects and the underlying facts upon which the scientific 
application of remedial or preventive measures is based. All of the more 
important insects of the farm, garden, and orchard are discussed at 
sufficient length to give a clear idea of their life histories and habits, 
together with the best means of control. The class work consists of 
lectures and text. 

2. — Household Entomology. Second year, fall term. Class work, 
two hours. Two credits. Required in the course in home economics. 
Prerequisite: General Biology. 

This course consists of illustrated lectures and reference reading on 
the habits, life history and general methods of control of the principal 
insects injurious to house, garden, lawn, and human health. 

HISTORY 

1. — European History I. First year, fall term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Required in the course in mechanic arts. 

This course will be introduced by a few lectures on the ancient world, 
but will take up the more serious part of the work at the fall of Rome 
and the very beginnings of modern European nationalities and languages, 
and will trace the story of European history and institutions to the end of 
the seventeenth century. Text, Robinson's Introduction to the Study of 
Western Europe, pages 1-537. 

2. — European History II. First year, winter term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Required in the course in mechanic arts. 

This course is a continuation of European History I, and covers the 
period from the opening of the eighteenth century to the present day. 
Emphasis is placed on present conditions and current events throughout 
the world. Text, Robinson and Beard's Outlines of European History, 
Part II. 

3. — English History. Second year, fall term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Required in the course in agriculture and in the 
course in home economics. 

This is a course in the history of England, with some attention to 
contemporary European history and institutions, and serves as a back- 
ground for the course in American history. Text, Andrews', Coman and 
Kendall's, Walker's, or Wrong's. 

4. — American History. First year, spring term, or second year, winter 
term. Class work, four hours. Four credits. Required of all students 
in the School of Agriculture. 

This corresponds to high-school courses in American History. It 
should be preceded by the course in English History or by the courses 
in European History I and II. This course will be based on Muzzey's 
American History as the text, but a limited amount of library work will 
be required. 

5. — Civics. Second year, spring term, or third year, winter term. 
Class work, four hours. Four credits. Required of all students in the 
School of Agriculture. 

This is not a course of the old type, usually called civil . government, 
nor a course in constitutional law, but a vigorous course in the actual 
workings of our present-day governmental and political activities. Text, 
Guitteau's Government and Politics in the United States, 



School of Agriculture 101 

6. — Industrial History. Third year, fall term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Required in the course in mechanic arts. 

This is a new course, devoted to a study of American industrial life; 
how industries have developed, how they have modified history and gov- 
ernment, and how in turn they have been modified by historical develop- 
ment and governmental regulations. This course is based primarily on 
Bogart's Economic History of the United States, second edition. 

INDUSTRIAL JOURNALISM 

Farm Writing. Third year, winter term. Class work, two hours; 
laboratory, two hours. Three credits. Required in the course in agricul- 
ture. 

One term's work is given in the elementary principles of writing for 
farm papers, newspapers, or magazines on agriculture, home economics, 
mechanical engineering and other industries taught in the College. 

MATHEMATICS 

1.— Industrial Arithmetic A. First year, fall term. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. Required in the course in agriculture. 

The course has two distinct aims: (1) a practical knowledge of the 
principles of numbers, both integral and fractional; (2) the practical 
application of these principles to problems of the farm and the shop. A 
large number of problems arising from actual experience over the whole 
field of agricultural science will be made the basis of problem work. 
Farm investments, farm accounts, and farm values will receive special 
attention. Text, Stevens and Butler's Practical Arithmetic. 

2. — Industrial Arithmetic W. Fall term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. Required in the course in home economics. 

The course follows the lines of Industrial Arithmetic A, except that 
the points of emphasis are varied to meet the needs of young women. 
Text, Stevens and Butler's Practical Arithmetic. 

3. — Algebra. First year, winter term. Class work, four hours. Four 
credits. Required in the courses in agriculture and home economics. 

The course includes an introduction to the first principles of algebra; 
the use and meaning of symbols; simple problems in algebraic reckoning; 
the solution of the simplest equations of the first and second degrees; 
careful practice in the evolution of algebraic formulae; first ideas of 
graphical analysis and the functional relation. Textbook, Wentworth and 
Smith's Vocational Algebra. 

4. — Algebra I. First year, fall term. Class work, four hours. Four 
credits. Required in the course in mechanic arts. 

This course includes a study of the four fundamental operations, in- 
tegral linear equations, and factoring. Text, Hawkes, Luby, and Touton's 
First Course in Algebra. 

5. — Algebra II. First year, winter term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. Required in the course in mechanic arts. 

Equations treated by factoring; fractions; fractional and literal linear 
equations; simultaneous linear equations; graphical representation, are 
taken up in this course. Text, Hawkes, Luby, and Touton's First Course 
in Algebra. Prerequisite: Algebra I. 

6. — Algebra III. First year, spring term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. Required in the course in mechanic arts. 

The subjects considered in this course are: involution, evolution, the 
theory of exponents, radicals, quadratic equations, with applications to 
practical problems. Text, Hawkes, Luby, and Touton's First Course in 
Algebra. Prerequisite: Algebra II. 



102 Kansas State Agricultural College 

7. — Algebra IV. Third year, fall term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. Required in the course in mechanic arts. 

This course includes a rapid review of factoring, fractions, linear 
equations and systems, roots, radicals and exponents, quadratic forms and 
systems with graphical work and theory of quadratics, ratio, proportion, 
and variation, the progressions, and the binomial theorem for positive 
integral exponents. Text, Hawkes, Luby, and Touton's Second Course in 
Algebra. 

8. — Applied Geometry. First year, spring term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Required in the courses in agriculture and me- 
chanic arts. 

The course includes simple problems in geometrical construction ; illus- 
tration, rather than proof, of important geometrical theorems; computa- 
tion of areas and volumes, with especial emphasis upon the problems 
arising in buildings and constructions on the farm. The whole will con- 
sist of a simple and practical course in mensuration. 

9. — Plane Geometry I. Second year, fall term. Class work, foar 
hours. Four credits. Required in the course in mechanic arts. 

Books I and II of Wentworth and Smith's Plane and Solid Geometry 
are studied in this course. Prerequisite: Algebra III. 

10. — Plane Geometry II. Second year, winter term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Required in the course in mechanic arts. 

This course includes a study of books III, IV, and V of Wentworth and 
Smith's Plane and Solid Geometry. Prerequisite : Plane Geometry I. 

11. — Solid Geometry. Second year, spring term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Required in the course in mechanic arts. 

Books VI, VII, and VIII of Wentworth and Smith's Plane and Solid 
Geometry are studied in this course. Prerequisite: Plane Geometry II. 

12. — Applied Mathematics. Third year, winter term. ^ Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. Required in the course in mechanic arts. 

This course embraces such subjects as the use of vernier and microme- 
ter calipers and the slide rule; work and power; levers and beams; specific 
gravity; the use of squared and logarithmic paper; logarithms and the 
elements of trigonometry ; problems in heat and electricity. Text, Cobb's 
Applied Mathematics. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

MEN'S DEPARTMENT 

1-3. — Physical Training I, II, and III. 

Six health talks. Elementary free-hand calisthenics; elementary light 
hand apparatus, including wands, dumb-bells, etc.; elementary heavy 
apparatus work, and games, are taken up. All work is graded in pro- 
gressive order for each term. Swimming is taught in the spring term. 
A physical examination is made of each entering student. 

WOMEN'S DEPARTMENT 

1-3. — Physical Training I, II, and III. Offered in the first year. 

This is an introductory course, including corrective exercises, light 
apparatus work, folk dancing, games, swimming. A physical examina- 
tion is made of each entering student. 

4-6. — Physical Training IV, V, and VI. Offered in the second year. 
A continuation ef courses I, II, and III, taking up fancy steps, Swedish 
gymnastics, games, and swimming. 



School of Agriculture 103 

7.— Physiology and Hygiene. First year, fall term. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. 

This course includes study of the anatomical structure and physio- 
logical functions of the human body. It includes a careful consideration 
of such factors in the maintenance of health as fresh air, diet, sleep, 
bathing, exercise, etc. 

PHYSICS 

1.— Physics A-I. Third year, fall term. Class work, three hours; 
laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required of all students in the 
course in agriculture. 

The fundamental laws of mechanics and sound are presented in this 
course. The application of these principles to agriculture is especially 
emphasized. Laboratory work is conducted, based upon principles dis- 
cussed in class and outlined in such a manner as to give students special 
drill in exact measurements. Text, Carhart and Chute's Physics. Pre- 
requisite: Algebra III. 

2. — Physics A-II. Third year, winter term. Class work, three hours ; 
laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required of all students in the 
course in agriculture. 

This is a continuation of work given in Physics A-I. A study is made 
of the units used in measuring electrical energy, of the principles involved 
in current distribution, and of the applications now being made of elec- 
tricity on the farm. Laboratory work is arranged "to give students prac- 
tice in working with electrical instruments and appliances. Text, Carhart 
and Chute's Physics, Prerequisite : Physics A-I. 

3. — Physics A-III. Third year, spring term. Class work, three hours ; 
laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required of all students in the 
course in agriculture. 

This is a continuation of Physics A-II, and involves a study of light 
and heat as a form of radiant energy involved in plant growth, weather 
conditions, and general phenomena. The laboratory work consists of 
thermometer tests, humidity measurements, calorimetry work, and light 
measurements. Text, Carhart and Chute's Physics. Prerequisite: 
Physics A-II. 

4. — Physics H-I. Second "year, fall term. Class work, three hours; 
laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required of all students in the 
course in home economics. 

The work given in this course has a direet bearing on the principles of 
mechanics and sound as they apply to the home. The laboratory work is 
especially adapted to this phase of the work. Text, Carhart and Chute's 
Physics. Prerequisite: Algebra III. 

5. — Physics H-IL Second year, winter term. Class work, three hours ; 
laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required of all students in the 
course in home economics. 

This course is a continuation of Physics H-I. The fundamental prin- 
ciples and laws of electricity are presented in this course, with special 
applications of the use of electricity in the home. Laboratory work is 
based on the study of simple electrical appliances used in the home. Text, 
Carhart and Chute's Physics. Prerequisite: Physics H-I. 

6. — Physics H-III. Second year, spring term. Class work, three 
hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required of all students in 
the course in home economics. 

This course is a continuation of Physics H-II and includes a study of 
the principles of heat and light, special work being done in illumination 
and ventilation of the home. The laboratory work is based on methods of 
measuring heat, testing thermometers, and testing light sources. Text, 
Carhart and Chute's Physics. Prerequisite: Physics H-II. 



104 Kansas State Agricultural College 

7. — Physics M-I. Second year, fall term. Class work, three hours; 
laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required of all students in the 
course in mechanic arts. 

Mechanics and Sound: This course provides the fundamental laws of 
mechanics and sound as adapted to work in mechanic arts, and special 
emphasis is placed upon a thorough knowledge of the units used and of 
the laws underlying machine principles. Laboratory work is arranged to 
give the students an opportunity to use some instruments of the better 
grade for making measurements and to test some of the physical prop- 
erties of matter. Text, Carhart and Chute's Physics. Prerequisite: 
Algebra III. 

8. — Physics M-II. Second year, winter term. Class work, three 
hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required of all students in 
the course in mechanic arts. 

Electricity: This course is a continuation of Physics M-I. The 
methods of producing electromotive force and of transferring, transform- 
ing, and measuring electrical energy are presented in this course. Labo- 
ratory work gives students an opportunity to use instruments and elec- 
trical apparatus in measuring and testing the effects of current. Text, 
Carhart and Chute's Physics, Prerequisite: Physics M-I. 

9. — Physics M-III. Second year, spring term. Class work, three 
hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required of all students in 
the course in mechanic arts. 

Heat and Light: This course is a continuation of Physics M-II.' A 
thorough study is made of heat and light as fundamental in the work 
of a mechanic, especially with respect to its application in heating, light- 
ing and ventilation. The laboratory work gives students opportunity to 
use light as an accurate method of measurement, and to test materials 
with respect to heat conductivity. Text, Carhart and Chute's Physics. 
Prerequisite: Physics M-II. 



Mechanic Arts Courses 



DRAWING 

1. — Free-hand Drawing. First year, fall term. Laboratory, six 
hours. Three credits. 

This course includes: exercises in drawing simple figures illustrating 
the effects of geometrical arrangement, radiation, repetition, symmetry, 
proportion, harmony, and contrast; exercises in drawing conventional 
plant ornaments; and free-hand lettering. 

2. — Object Drawing. First year, winter term. Laboratory, six 
hours. Three credits. 

Drawing from geometric solids and simple objects. Shading from the 
object. 

3. — Geometrical Drawing. First year, spring term. Laboratory, six 
hours. Three credits. 

Construction of perpendiculars, parallels, angles, polygons, tangent 
connections, etc. Construction of the ovoid, oval, spiral, and ellipse. 
The use of the T-square, drawing boards, and India ink. Simple working 
drawings. Lettering. 

4. — Shop Drawing I. Second year, fall term. One hour of lectures 
and recitations and four hours of drafting-room practice a week. Three 
credits. 



School of Agriculture 105 

A study of the fundamental principles of lettering, and the use of 
drawing instruments. Orthographic projection in its relation to working 
drawings. Simple exercises leading up to the study of working drawings 
in the succeeding terms. Prerequisite: Geometrical Drawing. Geom- 
etry I must accompany or precede this course. 

5. — Shop Drawing II. Second year, winter term. One hour of lec- 
tures and recitations and four hours of drafting-room practice a week. 
Three credits. 

A continuation of the preceding course, with more difficult exercises. 
In the latter part of the term free-hand sketches are made of simple 
machine parts, and working drawings are made from these sketches. 
Practice is given in making blue-prints. Prerequisites: Shop Drawing I 
and Geometry I. 

6. — Shop Drawing III. Second year, spring term. One hour of lec- 
tures and recitations and four hours of drafting-room practice a week. 
Three credits. 

Further practice in making working drawings of machine parts. Some 
attention is given to isometric and cabinet projections and to the develop- 
ment of patterns for sheet-metal work. Prerequisites : Shop Drawing II 
and Geometry II. 

7. — Color and Design I and II. Second year, fall and winter terms, 
respectively. Laboratory, six hours. Three credits each term. 

This course consists of a study, by means of water-color exercises, of 
color and shade values and their effects in designs, fabrics, dresses, wall 
paper, and decorations of all kinds. 

, g. — Farm Buildings. Third year, winter term. Laboratory, six hours. 
Three credits. 

Study of arrangement and construction of farm buildings. Drawing 
of plans, elevations, sections and details of a general-purpose barn. 

9. — Home Decoration. First year, spring term. Laboratory, eight 
hours. Four credits. 

Study of design and color and their application to the home, its furni- 
ture, carpets and rugs, wall decorations and pictures. 

SHOP WORK 

1. — Farm Carpentry. First year, winter term. Class work, one hour; 
shop work, four hours. Three credits. 

This is a course of exercises in joinery that are so graded as to give 
the student the principles of general carpenter work, and training in the 
proper use of tools and in the reading of drawings and blue-prints. Some 
work is given to bring out the principles of framing and building opera- 
tions, and practice in the use of paints and varnishes as protective cover- 
ings for woodwork. 

2. — Woodwork I. First year, fall term. Lectures, one hour; shop 
work, six hours. Four credits. 

This course consists of a graded set of problems in joinery, the princi- 
ples of which are used in the latter portion of the course in the making 
of a few simple pieces of cabinet work, together with practice in the use 
of stains, varnishes, rubbing and polishing of the articles made. 

3. — Elementary Foundry. First year, winter term. Lectures, one 
hour; shop work, six hours. Four credits. 

This course consists of bench and floor molding with a great variety of 
patterns, along with which the student gets experience with different 
kinds of sand and facings; also, open sand work, sweep molds, and in- 



106 Kansas State Agricultural College 

struction in machine molding, core making, setting of cores, gates and 
risers, and different methods of venting,, etc. The lectures consist of 
practical talks on the materials used in the foundry, the selection of sand, 
methods of venting, drying and handling of molds, cores, etc., for various 
classes of work. Also discussions on the handling of the cupola and the 
grading and mixing of the irons suitable for different classes of work. 
Special emphasis in all cases is laid upon the practical side of the work. 

4. — Farm Blacksmithing. First year, spring term. Class work, one 
hour; shop work, four hours. Three credits. 

This course consists of exercises in general forging operations, such as 
drawing, upsetting, welding, binding, twisting, hot and cold punching, 
and instruction in the use of fuel and fire, and the selection and care of 
tools. The course is such as will be of practical use to the man on the 
farm. 

5. — Elementary Blacksmithing I. First year, spring term. Lecture, 
one hour; shop work, four hours. Three credits. 

This consists of a very practical course in the forging operations, such 
as drawing, upsetting, welding, bending, twisting, punching, etc., to- 
gether with instruction in the proper use and care of the fire, tools, etc., 
and in the handling of metals in the forge. 



School of Agriculture 



107 



Trade Practice in Mechanic Arts Course. 

(School of Agbioulture. ) 
Trade Practice in Blacksmithing 



FALL 



FIRST YEAR 

WINTER 



SPRING 

Machine Shop I-S 
3 (0-6) 



Blacksmithing II- S 

3 (1-4) 
Gas and Oil Engines I 

3 (1-4) 



Blacksmithing V-S 

6 (0-12) 
Electricity I-S 

3 (2-2) 
Elements of Mechanism 

3 (3-0) 



SECOND YEAR 

Blacksmithing III-S 

3 (0-6) 
Strength of Materials I 

3 (3-0) 

THIRD YEAR* 

Blacksmithing YI-S 

6 (1-10) 
Machine Shop II-S 

3 (0-6) 
Steam Engines and Boilers I 

3 (1-4) 



Blacksmithing IV- S 

' 3 (0-6) 
Strength of Materials II 
3 (3-0) 



Blacksmithing VII-S 
8 (2-12) 

Concrete Construction I 

3 (1-4) 
Elective 

3 (-) 



PALL 



Trade Practice in Carpentry 



FIRST YEAR 

WINTER 



SPRING 



Woodturning 
3 (0-6) 



Bench Work 

3 (1-4) 
Gas and Oil Engines I 

3 (1-4) 



SECOND YEAR 

Form Const, and Framing 

3 (1-4) 
Strength of Materials I 

3 (3-0) 



Inside Finishing 

3 (1-4) 
Strength of Materials H 

3 (3-0) 



Building Construction I 

6 (2-8) 
Shop Drawing IV 

3 (0-6) 
Electricity I-S 

3 (2-2) 



THIRD YEAR* 

Building Details 

9 (2-14) 
Estimating 

3 (0-6) 



Building Construction II 

8 (2-12) 
Concrete Construction I 

3 (1-4) 
Elective 

3 (-) 



* No third-year trade practice work will be offered in any course during the college 
year 1914-1915. 



108 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



Trade Practice in Cement and Concrete Construction 



FALL 



FIRST YEAR 

WINTER 



SPRING 

Concrete Construction I 
3 (1-4)' 



Cement and Aggregate Tests 

3 (0-6) 
Cements and Aggregates 

3 (3-0) 



Electricity I-S 

3 (2-2) 
Structural Drawing 

3 (0-6) 
Plain Concrete Design 

3 (0-6) 
Structural Materials Tests 

3 (0-6) 



SECOND YEAR 

Strength of Materials I 

3 (3-0) 
Form Const, and Framing 

3 (1-4) 

THIRD YEAR 

Machine Shop I-S 

3 (0-6) 
Steam Engines and Boilers I 

3 (1-4) 
Concrete Construction III 

3 (1-4) 
Reinforced Concrete Design 

3 (0-6) 



Strength of Materials II 

3 (3-0) 
Concrete Construction II 

3 (0-6) 



Carpentry 

3 (0-6) 
Gas and Oil Engines I 

3 (1-4) 
Forms and Centering 

3 (1-4) 
Concrete Construction IV 

3 (1-4) 



Trade Practice in Gas Engines 



FALL 



FIRST YEAR 

WINTER 



SPRING 



Gas Engines I 
3 (1-4) 



Steam Engines and Boilers I 

3 (1-4) 
Gas Engines II 

3 (1-4) 



SECOND YEAR 

Gas Engines III 

3 (1-4) 
Machine Shop I-S 

3 (0-6) 



Gas Engines IV 

3 (1-4) 
Machine Shop 1I-S 

3 (0-6) 



Pipe Fitting 

3 (0-6) 
Concrete 

3 (0-6) 
Traction Engines I 

3 (0-6) 
Elements of Mechanism 

3 (3-0) 



THIRD YEAR* 

Gas Engines V 

3 (0-6) 
Electricity II-S 

6 (3-6) 
Strength of Materials I 

3 (3-0) 



Gas Engines VI 

3 (0-6) 
Electricity III-S 

6 (3-6) 
Strength of Materials II 

3 (3-0) 



* No third-year trade practice "work will be offered in any course during the college 
year 1914-1915. 



School of Agriculture 



109 



Trade Practice in Steam Engines and Boilers 



FALL 



FIRST YEAR 

WINTER 



SPRING 

Steam Engines and Boilers I 
3 (1-4) 



SECOND YEAR 

Steam Engines and Boilers II Steam Engines and Boilers III Steam Engines and Boilers IV 
3 (1-4) 3 (1-4) 3 (1-4) 

Gas and Oil Engines I Machine Shop I-S Machine Shop II-S 

3 (1-4) 3 (1-4) • 3 (1-4) 



Elements of Mechanism 

3 (3-0) 
Traction Engines I 

3 (0-6) 
Pipt, Fitting 

3 (0-6) 
Concrete 

3 (0-6) 



THIRD YEAR* 

Steam Engines and Boilers V 

3 (0-6) 
Electricity II-S 

6 (3-6) 
Strength of Materials I 

3 (3-0) 



Steam Engines and Boilers VI 

3 (0-6) 
Electricity IIT-S 

6 (3-6) 
Strength of Materials II 

3 (3-0) 



Trade Practice in Traction Engines 



FALL 



FIRST YEAR 

WINTER 



SPRING 

Traction Engines I 
3 (1-4) 



Steam Engines and Boilers I 

3 (1-4) 
Gas and Oil Engines I 

3 (1-4) 



Elements of Mochanism 

3 (3-0) 
Traction Engines IV 

3 (0-6) 
Concrete 

3 (0-6) 
Pipe Fitting 

3 (0-6) 



SECOND YEAR 

Traction Engines II 

3 (1-4) 
Machine Shop I-S 

3 (1-4) 

THIRD YEAR* 

Traction Engines V 

3 (0-6) 
Electricity II-S 

6 (3-6) 
Strength of Materials I 

3 (3-0) 



Traction Engines III 

3 (1-4) 
Machine Shop II-S 

3 (1-4) 



Traction Engines VI 

3 (0-6) 
Electricity III-S 

6 (3-6) 
Strength of Materials II 

3 (3-0) 



* No third-year trade practice work will be offered in any course during the college 
year 1914-1915. 



COURSES IN BLACKSMITHING. 

1. — Blacksmithing I-S. First year, fall or spring term. Class work, 
one hour; shop work, four hours. Three credits. 

The course includes general forging operations, such as drawing, up- 
setting, welding, twisting, punching, etc., together with instructions in 
the proper use and care of fire, tools, and forges. 

2. — Blacksmithing II-S'. Second year, fall term. Class work, one 
hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisites: Woodwork 
I, Foundry, and Blacksmithing I-S. 

The history and manufacture of tool steel, its relation to the industries, 
and the proper methods of selecting and working it in the shop are 
studied. 



110 Kansas State Agricultural College 

The laboratory work consists of the making of such tools as punches, 
chisels, drills, scrapers, hammers, and various other tools that are used 
in the trades. 

3. — Blacksmithing III-S. Second year, winter term. Laboratory, six 
hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Blacksmithing II-S. 

This is a practical course in the various forging operations, with 
practice both as blacksmith and helper, and includes the planning and 
laying out of work with special provisions for duplicate parts; forging 
and forming tools are made as nature of work requires. Lectures are 
given so that the principles underlying the different operations are 
thoroughly understood. 

4. — Blacksmithing IV-S. Second year, spring term. Laboratory, 
six hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Blacksmithing III-S. 

This course includes: the theory of hardening, tempering and an- 
nealing, case- and pack-hardening; a study of the nature of the different 
grades of carbon tool steels ; tool forging, including the proper manipula- 
tion of the various lathe, panes and shaper tools; forging and heat treat- 
ment of special and high-speed steels. Instruction is by lectures and 
demonstrations. 

5. — Blacksmithing V-S. Third year, fall term. Laboratory, twelve 
hours. Six credits. Prerequisite: Blacksmithing IV-S. 

General shop work is here given, in which emphasis is laid on the 
quantity as well as the quality of the work, the idea being to give the stu- 
dent a knowledge of the amount of time required to do certain work. The 
work is varied as much as possible so that the knowledge acquired will be 
as complete as possible. 

6. — Blacksmithing VI-S. Third year, winter term. Class work, one 
hour; laboratory, ten hours. Six credits. Prerequisite: Blacksmithing 
V-S. 

On the basis of the knowledge acquired during the previous terms, the 
student is required to make estimates on job work, direct workmen in the 
various lines of shop production, and lay out plans for general repair 
work. 

The idea is to give the student the knowledge and experience that will 
enable him to plan and manage a shop to the best advantage. 

7. — Blacksmithing VII-S. Third year, spring term. Class work, 
two hours ; laboratory, twelve hours. Eight credits. Prerequisite : Black- 
smithing VI-S. 

Regular blacksmithing and machine-shop practice is given on work 
such as is found in the regular custom shop, in order to develop accuracy 
and speed. The student at all times works under the critical eye of the 
instructor so as to correct any fault in the work. 

Visits are made to commercial shops, and written reports and dis- 
cussions are required on the methods of getting out work, pay systems, 
cost systems, buying and selling material, methods of handling men and 
customers, and the general considerations to be considered in conducting 
a business. 

COURSES IN CARPENTRY 

1. — Wood Turning. First year, spring term. Laboratory, six hours. 
Three credits. Prerequisites: Woodwork, and Foundry. 

Exercises in turning cylinders, cones, beads, convex and concave turn- 
ing, and exercises that will involve the use of all the different turning 
tools, and turning between centers, on the faceplate and with hollow 
chucks are here included. Some of the exercises are: tool handles, dumb- 
bells, rolling-pins, napkin rings, table legs, porch posts, balusters, built-up 
and solid newel posts, columns, and rosettes. 



School of Agriculture 111 

2. — Bench Work. Second year, fall term. Class work, one hour; 
laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Wood Turning. 

Hand work with the rabbet, router, beading and matching planes, and 
with dado, plow, and fillister in making of window sashes and frames, 
doors and frames, grooved flooring, door jambs, molding, etc. Along with 
the class work, lectures are given on the manufacture, use and care of the 
different varieties of lumber, grading rules, quarter-sawing, testing of 
lumber, piling to prevent warping, seasoning, kiln-dried lumber, steam- 
ing, and preserving wood, etc. 

3. — Form Construction and Framing. Second year, winter term. 
Class work, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: Bench Work. (For students in carpentry.) 

The fundamental factors to be taken into consideration in the con- 
struction of buildings, as the building site, laying out and squaring 
foundation, excavating, types of foundations, form building for concrete, 
anchoring, placing of the sills, joists, bridging, studding, bracing, rafter 
cutting and fitting, are studied in this course. 

The laboratory work consists of exercises along the lines given above. 

4. — Inside Finishing. Second year, spring term. Class work, one 
hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Form Con- 
struction and Framing. 

The course includes a combination of machine and hand work where 
the material is worked up on the machines and then fitted by hand. Some 
of the work consists of making plain and fancy casings, plate rails, pic- 
ture molding, picture frames, and in making simple pieces of furniture 
which are stained, varnished or otherwise finished. 

Lectures are given along with the work on the protective coatings for 
woods, and written reports and discussions will be required. A study will 
also be made of the different kinds of woodworking machinery, from 
manufacturers' catalogues and from machines, with instructions as to 
their proper care and use. 

5. — Building Construction I. Third year, fall term. Class work, 
two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Six credits. Prerequisite: Inside 
Finishing. 

A study of framework of buildings, partitions, rafters and methods of 
cutting, the use of the steel square, different types of trusses in common 
use, roofs and roofing, laying of sheeting, shingling, lathing; these are 
the subjects treated in this course. 

In so far as it is practical, work will be given on buildings in the 
actual process of construction, and written reports and discussions will 
be required. 

6. — Building Details. Third year, winter term. Class work, two 
hours; laboratory, fourteen hours. Nine credits. Prerequisite: Building 
Construction I. 

This work includes a study of the different varieties of stairs, porches, 
siding, building papers, cornices, chimneys, furnaces, and ventilating 
systems, with written reports and discussions, from catalogues, books, and 
plans. 

The laboratory work consists of building upon a small scale the struc- 
ture drawn in the fall term. 

7. — Estimating. Third year, winter term. Laboratory, six hours. 
Three credits. Prerequisite: Shop Drawing IV. 

Building plans and specifications are studied, a complete detailed list 
of all material required is made out, and the cost of such material is esti- 
mated from architects' plans and specifications. 

8. — Building Construction II. Third year, spring term. Class work, 
two hours; laboratory, twelve hours. Eight credits. Prerequisites: Shop 
Drawing IV, and Building Details, 



112 Kansas State Agricultural College 

This course embraces a study of building plans and specifications in 
order to learn to correctly interpret them. 

The laboratory work consists of practical building work, and so far as 
it is possible the work will be on buildings in the actual process of con- 
struction, and written reports and discussions are required. A study is 
also made of commercial shops, of pay systems, cost systems, buying and 
selling material, methods of handling men and customers, and the best 
methods used by successful men in conducting a business enterprise. 

9. — Shop Drawing IV. Third year, fall term. Laboratory, six hours. 
Three credits. Prerequisite: Shop Drawing III. 

Plans and specifications for a complete building are drawn up, with a 
detailed list of all material used, and the cost is estimated from the plans 
so prepared. 

10. — Carpentry. Third year, spring term. Laboratory, six hours. 
Three credits. Prerequisite: Form Construction and Framing. 

Wood turning, carving, pattern making, and the making of molds and 
forms for ornamental concrete castings are the subjects taught in the 



COURSES IN CEMENT AND CONCRETE 
CONSTRUCTION 

1. — Concrete Construction I. First year, spring term. Class work, 
one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Wood- 
work I. 

This course gives elementary instruction in the selection of materials 
and proper proportions for different kinds of concrete construction, and 
the essential principles of forming for, and of mixing and placing con- 
crete, are taught with special reference to machine and building founda- 
tions, sidewalks, and floors. 

The laboratory work consists of practice in the construction of such 
items as mentioned above. 

2. — Cement and Aggregate Tests. Second year, fall term. Labora- 
tory, six hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Cement and Aggregates, 
or may be taken simultaneously. 

Standard tests for fineness, specific gravity, soundness and strength of 
cement, for voids, uniformity coefficient and cleanness of sand and stone, 
and the effect of variation of these properties on the strength of mortars 
and concretes are the subjects taught here. 

3. — Cements and Aggregates. Second year, fall term. Class work, 
three hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Concrete Construction I. 

The properties and tests of cements and of concrete aggregates, and 
the proportions and quantities for different concretes, and also the prop- 
erties of concretes with different constituents are here dealt with. 

4. — Strength of Materials I. Second year, winter term. Class work, 
three hours. Three credits. Prerequisites: Physics M-I, Plane Geom- 
etry II, taken simultaneously. 

The reactions, bending moments, shears and stresses in simple struc- 
tures are determined. 

5. — Form Construction and Framing. Second year, winter term. 
Class work, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: Woodwork I. 

The fundamental factors to be taken into consideration in the con- 
struction of buildings, as the building site, laying out and squaring 
foundation, excavating, types of foundations, form building for concrete, 
anchoring, placing of the sills, joists, bridging, studding, bracing, rafter 
cutting and fitting, are studied here. 

The laboratory work consists of exercises along the lines given above. 



School of Agriculture 113 

6. — Strength of Materials II. Second year, spring term. Class 
work, three hours. Three credits. Prerequisite : Strength of Materials I. 

The course embraces a study of the behavior of wood, steel and con- 
crete when under stress, with the principles of design of structural ele- 
ments, especially of concrete, wood, and steel. 

7, — Concrete Construction II. Second year, spring term. Labora- 
tory^ six hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Strength of Materials II. 

Field work is given in practical reinforced concrete construction, with 
lectures on field methods of bending steel, of placing it and securing it in 
place, and of mixing and placing, with special reference to building and 
bridge construction. 

8. — Structural Drawing. Third year, fall term. Laboratory, six 
hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Shop Drawing III. 

This course is planned to give the student facility in reading and 
interpreting plans of buildings and other structures. 

9. — Plain Concrete Design. Third year, fall term. Laboratory, six 
hours. Three credits. Prerequisites: Structural Drawing, and Struc- 
tural Materials Tests, taken simultaneously. 

Plain concrete structural elements, such as foundations and retaining 
walls, are designed. 

10. — Structural Materials Tests. Third year, fall term. Labora- 
tory, six hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Concrete Construction II. 

Tension, compression, and bending tests are made on wood, steel, and 
concrete. 

11. — Concrete Construction III. Third year, winter term. Class 
work, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
Concrete Construction II. 

Concrete machinery and concrete distributing systems used on large 
construction work are studied. Practice is had in the construction of 
plaster and stucco work and in the finishing of concrete surfaces. 

12. — Reinforced Concrete Design. Third year, winter term. Lab- 
oratory work, six hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Plain Concrete 
Design. 

The course includes the design of simple reinforced concrete structures, 
with complete working drawings. 

13.-7-F0RMS and Centering. Third year, spring term. Class work, 
one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Rein- 
forced Concrete Design. 

Lectures are given on the design of forms and centering for concrete 
construction, with the preparation of working drawings in the drafting 
room for the structures designed in the preceding term, and other more 
complex structures. 

14. — Concrete Construction IV. Third year, spring term. Class 
work, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisites: 
Reinforced Concrete Design, and Concrete Construction III. 

Costs of concrete work are estimated, and practice is given in the 
manufacture of concrete blocks and in ornamental casting. 

15. — Concrete. Third year, fall term. Laboratory, six hours. Three 
credits. Prerequisite: Woodwork I. 

Elementary instruction is given in the selection of materials and 
proper proportions for different kinds of concrete construction, and the 
essential principles of forming for, and of mixing and placing concrete, 
with special reference to machine and building foundations, sidewalks, 
and floors. 

Laboratory work consists of practice in the construction of such items 
as mentioned above. 



114 Kansas State Agricultural College 

16.— Elements of Mechanism. Third year, fall term. Class work, 
three hours. Three credits. Prerequisites : Plane Geometry, Shop Draw- 
ing III, Strength of Materials I. 

The course includes an analysis of the different machine elements, 
such as screws, pulleys, belting, cams and gears, with such computations 
as are necessary to enable the proper size of these elements to be selected 
for use under given conditions. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICITY 

1.— Electricity I-S. Third year, fall term. Class work, two hours; 
laboratory, two hours. Three credits. 

This course embraces a study of wiring materials and electrical ma- 
chinery; line work; illumination; open and concealed wiring; wiring in' 
conduit and metal molding; installation and operation of both direct- 
and alternating-current motors, generators, lamps, and heating appliances. 

2.-— Electricity II-S. Third year, winter term. Class work, three 
hours; laboratory, six hours. Six credits. Prerequisites: Physics I, II, 
and III. 

The course comprises a study of wiring materials, wiring, and direct- 
current machinery; line work, open and concealed wiring, theory, in- 
stallation and operation of direct-current generators, motors, lamps, 
storage batteries, and heating appliances. 

3. — Electricity III-S. Third year, spring term. Class work, three 
hours; laboratory, six hours. Six credits. Prerequisite: Electricity II-S. 

This is a continuation of Electricity II-S. Alternating-current ap- 
paratus, generators, motors, transformers, rectifiers, wiring in conduit 
and in metal molding are here studied. 

COURSES IN GAS ENGINES 

1. — Gas Engines I. First year, spring term. Class work, one hour; 
laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisites: Foundry, and 
Blacksmithing I. 

This course comprises a study of heat engines, principles of gas 
engines, gas-engine auxiliaries, two- and four-cycle frames, material 
used in construction, essential parts of an internal-combustion engine. 

The laboratory work consists of a study of the different engines, bat- 
teries, different systems of ignition, cooling, operation and care, lubri- 
cators, lubricants, and adjustments. 

2. — Gas Engines II. Second year, fall -term. Class work, one hour; 
laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisite : Gas Engines I. 

The work here given includes a study of ignition, cooling, and gas- 
engine accessories, of the elements of gas producers, of the assembling of 
gas engines. 

The laboratory work teaches the operation of engines of all types, the 
dismounting, reassembling, and adjusting valves, gears, and ignition de- 
vices. 

3, — Gas Engines III. Second year, winter term. Class work, one 
hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Gas en- 
gines II. 

Fuels, both liquid and gaseous are studied. Heat determinations of 
different fuels are made. A study is made of indicators, planimeters, and 
brakes, of power determinations, and engine testing, of carburetion and 
carburetors. 

The laboratory work includes the running of engines with different 
fuels, and different carburetors; practice with indicators and planim- 
eters; brake tests for fuel economy, and mechanical efficiency. 



School of Agriculture 115 

4. — Gas Engines IV. Second year, spring term. Class work, one 
hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Gas En- 
gines III. 

The construction, erection, design, and operation of complete gas- 
engine plants for mills, factories, shops, lighting, water supply, irriga- 
tion, and private use are studied in this course. 

As laboratory work a gas producer is operated; fuels and lubricants 
are tested; general engine repair work is done. 

5. — Gas Engines V. Third year, winter term. Laboratory, six hours. 
Three credits. Prerequisites: Machine Shop III, Gas Engines IV, Elec- 
tricity II-S. 

The work comprises the erecting, fitting, equipping, and adjusting 
of engines; the designing of valve gears, valves, and cams; the production 
of two plates; the preparation of bulletins to cover the laboratory work. 

6. — Gas Engines VI. Third year, spring term. Laboratory, six hours. 
Three credits. Prerequisite: Gas Engines V. 

Tests are made of the engines erected during Trade Practice V, for 
fuel, economy, boiler horsepower, indicated horsepower, mechanical 
efficiency, general behavior of the engine. Correct tabulation of all tests 
is a required part of the work. 

7. — Gas and Oil Engines I. Second or third year, fall, winter or 
spring term. Class work, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three 
credits. Prerequisite: Blacksmithing I. 

This course includes a study of the four-stroke cycle and two-stroke 
cycle gasoline engine ; gas-engine fuels, mechanical details of gas engines, 
carburetors for gasoline and heavy-oil engines, ignition, cooling, and 
governing; selection and management of oil engines. 

COURSES IN MACHINE-SHOP WORK 

1.— Machine Shop I-S. First year, spring term. Laboratory, six 
hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Foundry. 

Practice is had in clipping, filing, scraping, drilling, shaper and 
planer work. Lathe work is given in cutting right and left threads, taper 
turning and threading. 

2. — Machine Shop II-S. Second year, spring term, and third year, 
winter term. Laboratory, six hours. Three credits. Prerequisites: 
Blacksmithing I, and Machine Shop I. 

This embraces practical work in making repairs on machinery, such 
as babbitting and fitting bearings, aligning shafting and pulleys, lacing 
and fitting belts, and general repair work on engines and other machinery. 

3. — Pipe Fitting. Third year, fall term. Laboratory, six hours. 
Three credits. 

Practice work is given in the cutting and threading of all sizes of 
standard and extra heavy pipe up to 10 inch, in the use of fittings of 
various kinds, in the squaring up of flanges, in the cutting, fitting and 
testing of gaskets for various pressures, in the grinding, packing and 
testing of valves. 

COURSES IN STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS 

1. — Steam Engines and Boilers I. First year, fall, winter or spring 
term. Class work, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. 
Prerequisite : Blacksmithing. 

The principal parts of a steam power plant are considered, including 
fire-tube and water-tube boilers, boiler auxiliaries, piping for boilers, 
feed-water heaters, firing; fundamental details of steam engines; selec- 
tion, operation and management of steam engines and boilers. 



116 Kansas State Agricultural College 

2. — Steam Engines and Boilers II. Second year, fall term. Class 
work, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
Steam Engines and Boilers I. 

This is a continuation of the work given in the previous term, includ- 
ing a study of fuels and combustion; also pumps and injectors. 

3. — Steam Engines and Boilers III. Second year, winter term. 
Class work, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequi- 
site: Steam Engines and Boilers II. 

The various steam-engine valve gears and governors are studied, ad- 
justed and tested. Some attention is also given to indicators and 
planimeters. 

4. — Steam Engines and Boilers IV. Second year, spring term. 
Class work, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequi- 
sites: Steam Engines and Boilers III, and Machine Shop I-S. 

The erection, lining up and repairing of steam engines is taken up. 
Sime time is also given to steam turbines. 

5. — Steam Engines and Boilers V. Third year, winter term. Labo- 
ratory, six hours. Three credits. Prerequisites: Steam Engines and 
Boilers IV, Concrete Pipe Fitting, and Machine Shop II-S. 

Engines, boilers, stokers, feed-water heaters, pumps and injectors are 
handled practically. 

6. — Steam Engines and Boilers VI. Third year, spring term. Labo- 
ratory, six hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Steam Engines and 
Boilers V. 

This course includes the practical handling of a steam-electric power 
plant, also of a heating plant. Some experience is also given in simple 
tests of engines and boilers. 

COUESES IN TRACTION ENGINES. 

1. — Traction Engines I. First year, fall or spring term. Class work, 
one hour; .laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Black- 
smithing. 

The subjects studied in this course are: Fundamental parts of a trac- 
tion engine; steam and gas traction engine details; differentials, gearing 
trains, and clutches. 

2. — Traction Engines II. Second year, winter term. Class work, 
one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisites: Traction 
Engines I, Steam Engines and Boilers I, Gas and Oil Engines I. 

Traction engine types and variations in detail for light and heavy 
fuels; radiators, cooling, ignition, lubrication, mountings; tractor wheels; 
steam and gas traction engine auxiliaries — these are the subjects studied 
here. 

3.—- Traction Engines III. Second year, spring term. Class work, 
one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisites: Trac- 
tion Engines II, and Machine Shop I-S. 

Steam and gas traction engines are operated, adjusted, and repaired. 

4.— Traction Engines IV. Third year, fall term. Laboratory, six 
hours. Three credits. Prerequisites: Traction Engines III, and Machine 
Shop II-S. 

Hitches and their value in plowing, side draft, handling of tractors 
on road and for belt work are here studied. 



School of Agriculture 117 

5. — Traction Engines V. Third year, winter term. Laboratory, 
six hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Traction Engines IV. 

The course includes adjustments, repairs, and overhauling of tractors; 
tests of tractors on belt work. 

6. — Traction Engines VI. Third year, spring term. Laboratory, 
six hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Traction Engines V. 

Road work with steam and gas tractors; grading, plowing, discing, 
seeding and freighting are done. The cost of operation is tested. 



Home Economics Courses 



DOMESTIC ART 

1. — Sewing I. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. 

This course includes practice in the fundamental stitches and their 
^application to the following: bags, towels, darning, patching, button- 
holes, Christmas gifts, at the discretion of the teacher. 

2. — Sewing II. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. 
The work includes machine problems, practice in flannel, the making 
»f kimonos and cooking aprons. 

3. — Sewing III. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. 
The course comprises pattern drafting and the making of corset covers 
and drawers. 

4. — Sewing IV. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. 
The course comprises the drafting of patterns for undergarments, 
skirt, and Waist, and the making of underskirts and nightgowns. 

5. — Shirt-waist Suit. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. 

Making a shirt waist and a skirt and drafting patterns for them com- 
prises the course. The materials used for the garments may be cotton 
or linen. 

& — Dressmaking. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. 
This course includes practice in the adaptation of patterns and the 
making of a simple cloth dress. 

7. — Textiles. Lecture, two hours. Two credits. 

The history and manufacture of textiles, the development of spinning 
and weaving, the classification and study of fibers, practical tests for 
adulteration, are taken up in the course. 

8. — Art Needlework. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. 

The course includes the following: stitches in crochet, knitting, cross- 
stitch, French embroidery, Roman cut work; their application to under- 
garments, waists, collars, and household articles. 

9. — Millinery. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. 

The course includes practical and artistic principles; preparing various 
materials for trimmings; practice in making bows, rosettes, and other 
forms of hat decoration; making wire and buckram frames; the use of 
velvet, silk, and straw; renovating, and the use of old materials. 

10. — Costume Design. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. 

This course includes the study of design, color harmony, and practice 
in their direct application to designs for textiles, embroidery, and cos- 
tumes; and the sketching of costumes in pencil and water color. 



118 Kansas State Agricultural College 

11. — Advanced Dressmaking. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. 

This course presents the use of bought patterns and practice in cutting,, 
fitting and finishing more elaborate dresses than those made up in pre- 
ceding courses. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

1-3. — Cookery I, II, and III. Second year, fall, winter and spring- 
terms, respectively. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits each term. 

Fundamental principles and processes of cooking are taken up. The 
purpose is to familiarize the student with laboratory methods, to give 
fundamental knowledge of foods and their preparation, and to develop 
skill and efficiency in the handling of materials, utensils, stoves, and fuels. 

4-6. — Cookery IV, V, and VI. Third year, fall, winter and spring 
terms, respectively. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits each term. 

Advanced cooking, including the canning and preserving of fruits and 
vegetables, and the preparation and serving of meals, are the subjects 
taken up. 

7. — Food Production. Third year, spring term. Class work, three 
hours. Three credits. 

This course is a study of food materials, their growth, the conditions 
under which they are matured and marketed, and the problems which 
relate to their storage and transportation. 

8. — Home Sanitation. First year, winter term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. 

A study is made &f location, surroundings, heating, lighting, ventila- 
tion and water supply of the house in their relation to the health of the 
family. 

9. — Home Management. First year, winter term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. 

A study is made of standards of living, including the care of walls r 
doors, woodwork, and plumbing. 



Vocational Guidance I and II. Freshman year, fall and winter 
terms, respectively. One credit each term. 

The purpose of this course is to give the students some insight into the 
vocations open to them, in order that they may have a sufficient knowl- 
edge for making a wise selection of a vocation. Both the social and 
economic possibilities of the different vocations are discussed. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 119 



Division of Agriculture 

William M Jardine, Dean, 



The teaching of a rational, practical system of agriculture is 
fundamental to industrial development in a State whose prin- 
cipal resources are derived from agricultural pursuits. This 
State has permanent prosperity in direct proportion to the 
producing capacity of her land. The unit of production is the 
acre, and the most successful farmer is necessarily the one 
who can produce, at minimum cost, a maximum quantity of 
the best quality of agricultural products to the acre. 

In order to do this, it is necessary to know something of the 
soil, the conservation of its fertility and moisture, and its 
proper cultivation ; the kinds of plants to grow and how to im- 
prove them; the selection, breeding and feeding of live stock; 
the maintenance of orchards, gardens, and attractive sur- 
roundings; farm buildings, and the equipment of the farm 
home with modern conveniences ; the best methods of market- 
ing the products of the farm ; and, in addition to all this, the 
making of the farm home the center of influence for good 
citizenship and fellowship in the neighborhood. 

A man may get many of these things through practical ex- 
perience, and thus become an exponent of modern farming, 
but the cost entailed is usually unnecessarily great. The 
Agricultural College furnishes a means of acquiring a system- 
atic and practical training in agriculture, which fits young 
men adequately for the farm, at a minimum of time and finan- 
cial cost. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The facilities for such training in this College are of the 
best. The College owns 748 acres of land, which is used for 
instruction and demonstration in the various courses in agri- 
culture and allied branches. The campus, which comprises 
160 acres, affords one of the best examples of ornamental tree 
planting and forestry in the State. Students working daily 
amid such surroundings can scarcely fail to gain an apprecia- 
tion of and love for the beautiful. A tract of 320 acres, pur- 
chased with an appropriation made by the legislature of 1909, 
is devoted to the work in agronomy. For horticultural and 
forestry work, eighty acres are used; for dairy work, about 
seventy acres ; and for animal husbandry purposes, 140 acres. 
The herds and flocks contain all the important breeds of dairy 
and beef cattle, hogs, horses, and sheep, among which are in- 
cluded the world's champion steers of a recent international 



120 Kansas State Agricultural College 

stock show at Chicago, and many animals that have won 
championships at local and state fairs in the past five years. 
With this class of stock available for the work in judging, the 
student is supplied with types of the best breeds, and becomes 
familiar with these types by actual handling of the stock. 

The College has one of the best-equipped schools of veteri- 
nary medicine in the West. It is rated in class "A" by the 
United States Department of Agriculture, which rating places 
it among the best in the United States and Canada. In addi- 
tion to giving the student the best possible technical training 
in veterinary medicine, the course is designed to give the 
broad culture necessary for men who are to take their place in 
society and public affairs. Professional men, such as veteri- 
narians, are placed in a more or less public relation to the 
community they serve. They must have a broad groundwork 
in cultural and ethical training, which will win them the con- 
fidence and respect of their communities. Success is measured 
in something more than dollars and cents, and the man whose 
view of life is no broader than his profession adds but little 
to the world and its happiness. The training given by the 
College in veterinary science, as in all its courses in agricul- 
ture, seeks to emphasize the value of the man as a man, as 
much as his value as a specialist in agriculture. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The various needs of the student are met by offering in the 
division of agriculture the following courses: 
A four-year course in agriculture. 
A four-year course in veterinary medicine. 
A three-year secondary course in agriculture. 
A two-year short winter course in agriculture. 
A two-year short winter course in dairying. 
A one-year short winter course in dairy manufactures. 
A short course in testing dairy products. 

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES. 

The four-year course in agriculture leads. to the degree of 
bachelor of science in agriculture. The four-year course in 
veterinary medicine leads to the degree of doctor of veterinary 
medicine. A certificate in agriculture is granted to a student 
completing the three-year course. A short-course certificate 
is granted to a student completing either of the two-year short 
courses in agriculture. 

The four-year course in agriculture is designed to meet the 
needs primarily of the students who expect to return to the 
farm. However, the student who completes any of the courses 
offered will have had sufficient training to enable him to enter 
some one of the many lines of agricultural industry as a 
specialist. The demand for men thus trained is constantly 



Division of Agriculture 121 

increasing, and such positions offer attractive opportunities 
for men who by nature and training are adapted to the work. 
The United States Department of Agriculture, the state col- 
leges and departments of agriculture, high schools, private 
institutions of secondary and college rank, and a great variety 
of commercial interests, are constantly demanding men 
trained in agriculture. 

The young man who expects to make farming his life work 
can start with no better asset than the thorough training in 
practical and scientific agriculture afforded by the four-year 
course. The American farmer needs more of the skill that 
comes through the training of the hand, in order that he may 
better do the work of farming; but infinitely more, he needs 
the training of the mind in the fundamental truths that lie 
back of every operation in farming, in order that he may use 
the skill of the craftsman with reason and judgment. One 
may learn to plow a field with the greatest skill ; the work may 
be a model of its kind. If, however, it is plowed with utter 
disregard of the moisture conditions which prevail, the result 
may be a failure. To understand the conditions which should 
determine when and how to plow is the work of the trained 
mind ; the other is the work of the trained hand. The farmer 
and the teacher in farming must possess both kinds of train- 
ing, and the courses of study have been revised with this fact 
in view, and have been so arranged that the student begins 
his practical training in agriculture on the first day he enters 
College, and continues it throughout the course. 

THE COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Two hundred fourteen credits in addition to military drill 
are required for graduation, as follows : 

Credits, 

Prescribed agriculture 55 

Electives in agriculture required, with their prerequisites 35 to 40 

Required in agriculture 90 to 95 

Prescribed in nonagriculture 107 

Electives in nonagriculture required 17 to 12 

Required in nonagriculture 124 to 119 

Total term hours for graduation 214 214 

Only those students will be allowed to graduate who have 
had at least six months' practical experience in agriculture, 
approved by the Dean of the Division of Agriculture, and who 
have elected (including the prerequisites) twenty credits 
within a department of the Division of Agriculture. The pre- 
requisites are to be other than those in the required work. 

The student who completes the freshman and sophomore 
years will have had, in addition to the fundamental work in 



122 Kansas State Agricultural College 

chemistry, zoology, and botany, practical studies each term 
in farm crops, cattle, hogs, horses, sheep, dairying, poultry, 
horticulture, and farm mechanics. These two years give the 
student a general knowledge of the whole range of practical 
agriculture. One-third of the student's time is devoted to 
these subjects. 

During the junior and senior years the student continues 
his studies of fundamental science, and learns to apply science 
to practical agriculture. He is led step by step to 'understand 
the scientific relation of every farming operation. There is 
so much agriculture to be taught that it becomes necessary 
for the student to choose in which of the general lines he will 
find that which best suits his needs or liking. This is made 
possible by numerous electives in soils, crops, farm machinery, 
animal husbandry, dairying, horticulture, milling, and poultry. 

The foundation of all agricultural work is the soil and the 
crops grown upon it. Success in live stock or dairying de- 
pends, in a great measure, upon the ability of the soil to pro- 
duce, with economy, sufficient crops of the right character. 
Success in grain farming depends wholly on the productive- 
ness of the soil and the selection of the crops and of methods 
of culture adapted to the region under cultivation. 

THE COURSE IN VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Veterinary medicine has made remarkable advances within 
recent years, and is taking its place alongside human medicine 
as a science. In truth, medical science and veterinary science 
are but specialized branches of the same science, and must be 
developed together. The modern veterinarian takes his place 
in the community as a professional man of education and 
culture. With the general improvement of the live stock on 
the farms, and with their advance in value, there is constant 
increase in the demand for skilled physicians to care for them. 

The veterinarian, while primarily trained to conserve the 
health of farm animals, has a yet larger service to render in 
preventing diseases common to both man and beast from being 
communicated from domestic anim.als to man. Moreover, he 
must see that the animals slaughtered for meat are healthy and 
that the products are handled, under such conditions as render 
them suitable for human food. 

The public is now demanding that milk and other food 
products be free from contamination, and that they be in- 
capable of transmitting dangerous diseases, like tuberculosis^ 
typhoid fever, scarlet fever, and diphtheria. There is ample 
work for all of the thoroughly competent veterinarians that 
the colleges of the country will train. 

The course in veterinary medicine at the Agricultural Col- 
lege was established to give the young men of this State 
an opportunity to pursue these studies in an agricultural 



Division of Agriculture 123 

environment, where the facilities offered by other branches 
of the College would be at their command. While the instruc- 
tion in this course is largely technical, enough subjects of a 
general character are included to give a sound education and a 
broad outlook. 

Better to fit the veterinarian to deal wisely with the live- 
stock problems which he has to meet, he is required to take 
the work in stock feeding, stock breeding, stock judging, pedi- 
grees, milk inspection, vertebrate zoology, embryology, and 
agricultural economics, in addition to his purely professional 
work. 

The diploma from this school is recognized by the United 
States Department of Agriculture, by the United States Civil 
Service Commission, by the American Veterinary Medical 
Association, and by the various examining boards of the sev- 
eral states and territories of America where it has been pre- 
sented. 

THREE-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE 

The purpose of the three-year course is to furnish practical, 
systematic training in agriculture to persons of mature judg- 
ment who are unable to meet the college entrance requirements. 
The work is given by the regular members of the College 
Faculty. This course, throughout, emphasizes the practical 
phases of agriculture. The necessity for a thorough under- 
standing of the fundamental principles that form the founda- 
tion upon which agricultural practices are built is, however, 
not lost sight of, and as much of this phase of the work is 
given as the student's preparation will permit. 



Course in Agriculture 



The Arabic numeral immediately following the name of a subject indicates the number 
of credits, while the numerals in parentheses indicate the number of hours a week of 
recitation and of laboratory, respectively. 

FRESHMAN 

FALL WINTER SPRING- 

•Chemistry I Chemistry II Chemistry III 

4 (3-2) 4 (2-4) 4 (3-2) 

English I English II College Rhetoric I 

4 (4-0) 4 (4-0) 4 (4-0) 
General Botany Plant Anatomv Plant Physiology I 

5 (3-4) 5 (3-4) " 4 (2-4) 
Market Types and Classes of Breeding Types and Classes Plant Propagation 

Stock 4 (1-6) of Stock 4 (1-6) 4 (3-2) 

Dairy Judging 
2 (0-4) 
.Military Drill Military Drill Military Drill 



124 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



COURSE IN AGRICULTURE— continued 





SOPHOMORE 




FALL 


WINTER 


SPRING 


Qualitative Analysis 


Elementary Organic Chem- 


Quantitative Analysis I 


4 (2-4) 


istry 4 (4-0) 


2- (2-0) or 


Cereal Crop Production 


Forage Crops 


Agricultural Chemistry 


5 (3-4) 


4 (3-2) 


2 (2-0) 


General Zoologv I 


General Zoology II 


Farm Mechanics 


4 (2-4) 


4 (2-4) 


4 (2-4) 


Anatomy 


Library Methods 


Embryology 


5 (0-10) 


2 (1-2) 


4 (2-4) 




Animal Physiology 


1'iinciples of .Feeding 




4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 
Elements of Dairying 
4 (2-4) 


Military Drill 


Military Drill 

JUNIOR 


Military Drill 


Agricultural Chemistry 


American Government 


General Entomology 


2 (2-0) or 


4 (4-0) 


4 (3-2) 


Quantitative Analysis I 


Soils 


Soil Fertility 


2 (0-4) 


5 (3-4) 


4 (3-2) 


General Geology 


Principles of Animal Breed- 


Elementary Journalism 


4 (4-0) 


ing 4 (4-0) or 


2 (0-4) 


General Bacteriology 


Plant Breeding 




4 (2-4) 


4 (2-4) 




Farm Poultry Production 






3 (2-2) 






Electives* 


Electives* 


Electives* 


5 (-) 


5(-) 

SENIOR 


8 (-) 


Economics 


Agricultural Economics 


Sociology 


4 (4-0) or 


4 (4-0) or 


4 (4-0) or 


Principles of Sociology 


Rural Sociology 


Economics 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) or 


4 (4 0) 


College Rhetoric II 


American History I 




4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 
Farm Management 
4 (3-2) 




Electives* 


Electives* 


Electives* 


10 (-) 


10 ( - ) 


10 (-) 



Agricultural Electives for Students in the Course 
in Agriculture 

AGRONOMY 



FALL 

Advanced Soils 

4 (2-4) 
Advanced Farm Mechanics 

4 (1-6) 



WINTER 

Principles of Agronomic Ex- 
perimentation 4 (1-6) 
Cereal Crop Improvement 

4 (1-6) 
Soil Research 

4 (0-8) 
Farm Building and Equip- 
ment 4 (2-4) 



SPRING 

Forage Crop Improvement 

4 (1-6) 
Soil Survey 

4 (2-4) 
Soil Research 

4 (0-8) 
Irrigation and Drainage 

4 (2-4) 



* Students preparing to teach should take psychology and the educational electives, . 
group 18 of the electives, for the course in general science. 



Division of Agriculture 



125 



Electives for Students — continued 



FALL 

History of Breeds and 

Pedigrees 4 (2-4) 
Live Stock Management I 

2 (0-4) 
Advanced Judging II 

2 (0-4) 
Breeding Pure-bred Live 
Stock 2 (2-0) 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

WINTER 

Pork and Mutton Production 
3 (3-0) 

Meats 

2 (1-2) 



SPRING 

Live Stock Management 11 

2 (0-4) 
Advanced Judging I 

2 (0-4) 
Beef Production 

2 (2-0) 
Horse Production 

3 (3-0) 
Seminar 

1 d-0) 



Pure-hred Dairy Cattle 

3 (2-2) 
Butter-making and Creamery 
Management 5 (3-4) 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Milk Products and Herd 
Management 3 (3-0) 



Pomology I 

2 (0-4) 
Kitchen Gardening 

2 (2-0) 
Advanced Pomology 

4 (3-2) 



HORTICULTURE 

Principles of Orcharding 

3 (3-0) 
Spraying 

3 (1-4) 



Dairy Inspection I 

2 (1-2) 
Cheese and Ice Cream Making 

4 (2-4) 
Dairy Buildings and Equip- 
ment 2 (2-0) 
Advanced Dairy Judging 

1 (0-2) 
Dairy Seminar 

2 (2-0) 



Small Fruits 
2 (2-0) 
Ornamental Gardening 

2 (2-0) 
Orchard Management 

4 (2-4) 
Market Gardening 

3 (2-2) 
Landscape Gardening 

3 (2-2) 

Landscape Plans and Ma- 
terials 4 (2-4) 

Greenhouse Construction and 
Management 4 (4-0) 



Commercial Grain and Grain 

Inspection 4 (3-2) 
Advanced Experimental 

Milling 4 (0-8) 



MILLING- INDUSTRY 

Grain Products 

4 (3-2) 
Wheat and Flour Testing 

4 (1-6) 



Experimental Milling 

2 (0-4) 
Experimental Baking 

4 (0-8) 
Milling Practice 

4 (0-8) 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 



Practice in Candling 

1 (0-2) 
Practice in Caponizing 
and Dressing 1 (0-2) 
Breeds and Types 

3 (1-4) 



Advanced Judging 

2 (0-4) 
Poultry Management 

(Vet) 2 (2-0) 



FORESTRY 



Silviculture 
3 (2-2) 



.Practice in Poultry Feeding- 
1 (0-11%) 4 weeks 

Practice in Incubation 
1 (0-11%) 4 weeks 

Practice in Brooding 
1 (0-11%) 4 weeks 



Farm Forestry 
4 (3-2) 

Dendrology 
2 (1-2) 



126 Kansas State Agricultural College 



List of Electives for Agricultural Students, with Their Prerequisites. 

Subject. Prerequisites, 

Agronomy. 

Forage Crop Improvement Forage Crops, Principles of Breeding. 

Principles of Agronomic Experimentation, Forage Crops, Soil Fertility, Forage Crop 

Improvement. 

Advanced Grain Judging Cereal Crop Production. 

Cereal Crop Improvement Forage Crops, Taxonomic Botany, Princi- 
ples of Breeding. 

Soil Survey Soils. 

Advanced Soils Soils. 

Soils Research I Advanced Soils, Soil Bacteriology. 

Soils Research II Soils Research I. 

Advanced Farm Mechanics Farm Mechanics. 

Farm Buildings and Equipment Farm Mechanics. 

Irrigation and Drainage Farm Mechanics, Soil Fertility. 

Animal Husbandry. 

History of Breeds and Pedigrees Principles of Feeding. 

Live Stock Management Principles of Feeding. 

Pork and Mutton Production Principles of Feeding. 

Live Stock Management II Live • Stock Management I. 

Advanced Judging I Market Types and Classes, Breeding Types 

and Classes, Principles of Feeding. 

Advanced Judging II Advanced Judging I. 

Breeding Pure-Bred Live Stock Advanced Judging I. 

Meats Principles of Feeding. 

Beef Production Principles of Feeding, 

Horse Production Principles of Feeding. 

Animal Husbandry Seminar History of Breeds and Breeding, Breeding 

Pure-Bred Live Stock. 

Breeding Types I Market Types and Classes. 

Principles of Feeding Elementary Organic Chemistry. 

Bacteriology. 

Soil Microbiology General Bacteriology. 

Dairy Bacteriology General Bacteriology. 

Serum Threapy (Vets) Pathogenic Bacteriology I and II. 

. Bacteriology of Poultry Diseases and 

Poultry Products General Bacteriology. 

Botany. 

Plant Physiology II Plant Physiology I. 

Advanced Plant Breeding Plant Breeding. 

Economic Botany Plant Morphology. 

Plant Pathology II Plant Pathology I. 

Plant Pathology III Plant Pathology II. 

Seed Testing General Botany. 

Chemistry. 

Quantitative Analysis II Quantitative Analysis I. 

Quantitative Analysis III Quantitative Analysis II. 

Quantitative Analysis IY Quantitative Analysis III. 

Chemistry D-I Quantitative Analysis I. 

Chemistry D-II Chemistry D-I. 

Principles of Animal Nutrition Elementary Organic Chemistry. 

Inorganic Chemistry I, II, III Qualitative Analysis. 

Organic Chemistry I, II, III None. 

Physiological Chemistry I, II, III Elementary Organic Chemistry. 

Dairy Husbandry. 

Dairy Inspection I General Bacteriology, Ohem. D-I and D-II. 

Pure-Bred Dairy Cattle. None. 

Butter-Making and Creamery Manag'm't, None. 

Cheese and Ice Cream Making Chem. D-I and D-II, Dairy Bacteriology. 

Dairy Buildings and Equipment None. 

Advanced Dairy Judging Dairy Judging, 

Dairy Seminar Elements of Dairying, Dairy Inspection I, 

Pure-Bred Dairy Cattle, Milk Production. 

Dairy Inspection II None. 

Milk Production and Herd Management, Principles of Feeding. 

Home Dairying None. 

Economics. 

Agricultural Economics None. 



Division of Agriculture 127 

Electives for Students — continued 

Subject. Prerequisites, 

Education. 

Psychology None. 

History of Education None. 

Principles of Education None. 

Teaching Method None. 

Educational Psychology None. 

Schpol Hygiene None. 

School Administration None. 

Practice Teaching None. 

Agricultural Education None. 

Rural Education None. 

Educational Seminar None. 

English Language. 

Argumentation and Debate College Rhetoric I. 

Bible English College Rhetoric I. 

English Practice College Rhetoric I. 

Farm and Home English College Rhetoric I. 

Business English College Rhetoric I. 

Applied English College Rhetoric I. 

Farm Advertising College Rhetoric I. 

Farm Stories College Rhetoric I. 

Farm Bulletins College Rhetoric I. 

Applications College Rhetoric I. 

English Literature. 

English Literature I College Rhetoric I. 

English Literature II English Literature I. 

Studies in Oratory College Rhetoric I. 

English Drama College Rhetoric I. 

The English Novel College Rhetoric I. 

Nineteenth Century Literature College Rhetoric I. 

American Literature College Rhetoric. 

Entomology. 

Insect Morphology General Entomology. 

Horticultural Entomology General Entomology. 

General Economic Entomology General Entomology. 

General Advanced Entomology General Entomology. 

Milling Entomology General Entomology. 

Forestry. 

Farm Forestry None. 

Dendrology None. 

Silviculture Farm Forestry and Dendrology. 

German. 

Elementary German I None. 

Elementary German II Elementary German I. 

German Readings Elementary German II. 

German Comedies German Readings. 

Scientific German I German Readings. 

Scientific German II Scientific German I. 

History. 

Modern Europe None. 

American History I None. 

American History II American History I. 

European Industrial History None. 

Kansas History None. 

Business Law None. 

Farm Law None. 

Horticulture. 

Pomology None. 

Kitchen Gardening None. 

Small Fruits Plant Propagation. 

Ornamental Gardening None. 

Advanced Pomology Pomology I. 

Principles of Orcharding Plant Propagation, Advanced Pomology. 

Spraying Chemistry I, II. 

Orchard Management None. 

Market Gardening None. 

Landscape Gardening None. 

Landscape Plans and Materials None. 

Greenhouse Construction and Manag'm't, None. 



128 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Electives for Students — continued 

Subject. Prerequisites. 

Industrial Journalism. 

Farm Writing Elementary Journalism. 

Gathering News Farm Writing. 

Journalism Practice I to VI Preceding Terms in Journalism Practice. 

Copy Reading Gathering News. 

Newspaper Law Copy Reading. 

Editorial Practice Newspaper Law. 

Milling Industry. 

Commercial Grain and Grain Inspection, Cereal Crop Production. 

Grain Products Commercial Grain and Grain Inspection. 

Experimental Milling Grain Products. 

Advanced Experimental Milling Experimental Milling. 

Wheat and Flour Testing Commercial Grain and Grain Inspection, 

Grain Products, and Quantitative Analy- 
sis (6 credits). 

Experimental Baking Tests Wheat and Flour Testing. 

Milling Practice Advanced Experimental Milling. 

Poultry Husbandry. 

Practice in Poultry Feeding None. 

Practice in Incubation . . . '. None. 

Practice in Brooding Practice in Incubation. 

Practice in Candling ' None. 

Practice in Caponizing and Dressing... None. 

Breeds and Breed Types None. 

Advanced Judging Breeds and Breed Types. 

Poultry Management None. 

Home Poultrying None. 

Practice in Milk Feeding None. 

Sociology. 

Social Psychology None. 

Rural Sociology None. 

Community Surveys None. 

Zoology. 

Advanced Zoology I, II, III Zoology I, II, and Embryology. 

Advanced Mammalian Embryology Zoology I, II, and Embryology. 

General Zoology Technique Zoology I, II. 

Parasitology Zoology I, II. 

Evolution of Domestic Animals Zoology I, II, and Embryology. 

Economic Zoology Zoology I, II. 



Division of Agriculture 



129 



Course in Veterinary Medicine 

The Arabic numeral immediately following the name of a subject indicates the number 
of credits, while the numerals in parentheses indicate the number of hours a week of 
recitation and of laboratory, respectively. 





FRESHMAN 




FALL 


WINTER 


SPRING' 


Anatomy I 

6% (1-11) 


Anatomy II 

6*6 (1-11) 


Anatomy III, 4 (1-6) or 
Anatomy IV, 5 (2-6) 


Chemistry I 
4 (3-2) 


Chemistry II 
4 (2-4) 


Chemistry III 
4 (3-2) 


General Zoology I 
4 (2-4) 


General Zoology II 
4 (2-4) 


Embryology 
4 (2-4) 




Histology I 
4 (2-4) 


Histology II 
4 (2-4) 


Market Types and Classes 
of Stock 4 (1-6) 


Poultry Management 
2 (2-0) 


Breeding Types I 
4 (1-6) 


Military Drill 


Military Drill 

SOPHOMORE 


Military Drill 


Anatomy IV, 5 (2-6) or 
Anatomy III, 4(1-6) 


Anatomy V 
4 (1-6) 


xVnatomy VI 
3 (1-4) 


Histology III 
4 (2-4) 


Comparative Physiology I 
7 (5-4) 


Comparative Physiology II 
7 (5-4) 


El. Organic Chemistry 
4 (4-0) 


Qualitative Analysis 
4 (2-4) 


Principles of Feeding 
4 (4-0) 


Medical Botany 
3 (1-4) 


Pathogenic Bacteriology I 
4 (2-4) 




English I 
4 (4-0) 


English II 
4 (4-0) 


College Rhetoric I 
4 (4-0) 


Military Drill 


Military Drill 

JUNIOR 


Military Drill 


Pathology I 
7 (5-4) 


Pathology II 
7 (4-6) 


Pathology III 
7 (4-6) 


Materia Medica I 
4 (4-0) 


Materia Medica II 
2 (2-0) 




Pharmaey 
3 (1-4) 


Therapeutics I 
2 (2-0) 


Therapeutics II 
4 (4-0) 


Surgery I 
3 (3-0) 


Surgery II 
3 (3-0) 


Surgery III 
3 (3-0) 


Diagnosis 
3 (3-0) 


Medicine I 
3 (3-0) 


Medicine II 
3 (3-0) 




Pathogenic Bacteriology II 
4 (2-4) 


Serum Therapy 
4 (3-2) 


Clinic 

6 (0-12) 


Clinic 

6 (0-12) 

SENIOR 


Clinic 

6 (0-12) 


Surgery IT 
3 (3-0) 


Surgery Y 
3 (3-0) 


Surgery VI 
3 (3-0) 


Medicine III 
3 (3-0) 


Infectious Diseases 
4 (4-0) 


Sanitary Medicine 
4 (4-0) 


Histtry of Breeds and 
Pedigrees 4 (2-4) 


Principles of Animal 
Breeding 4 (4-0) 


Conformation and Soundness 
2 (2-0) 


Horseshoeing 
2 (2-0) 


Parasitology 
3 (2-2) 


Meat Inspection 
4 (4-0) 


Operative Surgery I 
2 (0-4) 


Operative Surgery II 
2 (0-4) 


Dairy Inspection II 
2 (0-4) 


Obstetrics 
5 (4-2) 


Jurisprudence 
2 (2-0) 

Ophthalmology 
2 (2-0) 




Clinic 

6 (0-12) 


Clinic 

6 (0-12) 


Clinic 

6 (0-12) 



130 Kansas State Agricultural College 

AGRONOMY 

Professor Call. 

Assistant Professor Salmon 

Assistant Professor Throokmokton 

Assistant Cunningham 

Assistant Wilson 

Assistant Kbnnby 

Assistant Millar 

Assistant "Wirt 

Assistant Bledsoe 

Assistant Bonnett 

Assistant Grime s 

Fellow MoNall 

Fellow LaTourette 

Fellow SlEGLINGER 

The College farm used by the Department of Agronomy comprises 320 
acres of medium rolling upland soil, well suited to experimental and 
demonstration work. It is well equipped with all kinds of farm machinery 
necessary in crop production. The general fields and experimental plots 
used for the breeding and testing of farm crops, and for conducting soil- 
fertility experiments and experiments in methods of soil culture, afford 
the student excellent opportunities for study and investigation. 

A large and well-equipped laboratory for soil physics and soil-fertility 
work is maintained for the regular use of students. Laboratories for 
grain judging and crop judging are maintained for students taking this 
work. Material is provided for the use of the students in the study and 
determination of the grains and forages best adapted to different pur- 
poses and most suitable for growing under different soil and climatic 
conditions. Ample greenhouse space is provided for the students' use in 
germinating seeds under varying soil-moisture conditions, at different 
depths of planting, and with varying degrees of temperature; and for 
research work in soils during the winter months. 

The farm-mechanics laboratory is well supplied with representative 
types of farm machinery for demonstration and illustrative purposes in 
farm mechanics. Different makes of all kinds of farm machinery are 
supplied by implement manufacturers for study and investigation. 

The Department of Agronomy offers courses in grain judging, crop 
production, soil physics, soil fertility, soil surveying, farm mechanics, 
irrigation and drainage, and farm management. 

The following detailed description of courses will give a definite under- 
standing of each subject given, its position in the course, and the pro- 
portion of time devoted to class and to laboratory work. 

COURSES IN FARM CROPS 

1. — Cereal Crop Production. Sophomore year, fall term. Class 
work, three hours; laboratory, four hours. Five credits. Eequired in 
the course in agriculture ; elective in the course in general science. 

This course is a study of cereal crops, largely from a production view- 
point. The crops considered are corn, wheat, oats, barley, rye, rice, 
buckwheat, and grain sorghum. The origin, the history of development, 
and the factors influencing growth, are studied. Pacts designating the 
best place in a rotation of crops are presented. Proper seed-bed prepara- 
tion, cultural methods, and factors which tend to maximum production, 
receive highest consideration. 

Laboratory. — In the laboratory a study of the physical characters of 
each of the cereal crops is made. 



Division of Agriculture 131 

2. — Forage Crops. Sophomore year, winter term. Class work, three 
hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required in the course in 
agriculture; elective in the course in general science. Prerequisite: 
Cereal Crop Production. 

This course includes a study of forage and fiber crops, with special 
reference to history, method of development, growth, distribution, culture, 
and uses. The culture and the adaptation of perennial grasses for hay 
and pasture are considered. Annual forage crops, including sorghums, 
rape, millets, legumes, and cereals, are studied with reference to their 
production and uses for pasture, silage, soiling, fodder, and hay. 

Laboratory. — In the laboratory both sheaf and mounted specimens of 
forage crops are studied. In the greenhouse about fifty types of forage 
plants are kept growing for laboratory use. The student is, therefore, 
given an opportunity to become familiar with the structure and growth 
of many forage plants. A study is made of the different commercial tame 
grasses and clovers and their seeds, with special reference to quality, 
purity, and freedom from adulterants and weed seeds. 

3. — Forage Crop Improvement. Senior year, fall term. Class work, 
one hour ; laboratory, six hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in 
agriculture. Prerequisite : Principles of Breeding. 

This is an advanced course in forage crops and their improvement, 
especially f roin the breeder's standpoint. The lectures deal with forage- 
crop investigations. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory period is devoted to the collecting, com- 
piling, classifying and card-indexing of the data on this subject. Special 
subjects are assigned to each student for presentation to the class. The 
individual desires of each student and his interest in a particular crop 
are allowed to govern assignments of subjects. 

4. — Principles of Agronomic Experimentation. Senior year, winter 
term. Class work, one hour; laboratory, six hours. Four credits. Elec- 
tive in the course in agriculture. Prerequisites: Forage Crops, Soil 
Fertility, Forage Crop Improvement, and Principles of Breeding. 

This is an advanced course in technical experimentation along agro- 
nomic lines. The lectures deal with the history and development of ex- 
periments with soils and field crops. Attention is called to the arrange- 
ment of the crops on an experiment farm as regards adaptation to soil and 
topography. The size, the management, and the shape of plots for crop 
and soil, or joint research, are considered. The method and theory of 
check plats and the duplication of experiments are discussed. The re- 
sidual effects and the seasonal influences and their effects upon the fol- 
lowing year's work are considered, together with means of overcoming 
these factors. The methods of experimentation followed at various sta- 
tions are discussed. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory period is devoted to the working out of 
results secured in actual experimental operations and the compiling of 
these data. 

5. — Advanced Grain Judging. Senior year, fall term. Laboratory, 
four hours. Two credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. Pre- 
requisite: Agronomy 1. 

This course consists of the study of grain. It includes the determina- 
tion of moisture and the effect of excessive moisture on the quality of 
grain. A study is made of the effect of mixed varieties and foreign ma- 
terial upon quality. These studies are made with reference to conditions 
during production, harvesting, and marketing. The course includes the 
judging and commercial grading of grain. 

6. — Cereal Crop Improvement. Senior year, spring term. Lecture, 
one hour; laboratory, six hours. Four credits. Elective in the course 
in agriculture. Prerequisites: Forage Crops, Taxonomic Botany, and 
Principles of Breeding. 



132 Kansas State Agricultural College 

This is an advanced study of the cereal crops and methods for their 
improvement. The laws and principles underlying the breeding of 
cereals are given special attention. The lectures deal with systems of 
grain crop management and. factors affecting their improvement. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory period is used partly for the collection, 
reading and classification of material concerning cereal improvement. 
Various assignments are given the students. So far as possible, the 
individual desires of each student and his interest in a particular crop 
are allowed to govern the assignment of subjects. 

COUESES IN SOILS 

7. — Soils. Junior year, winter term. Class work, three hours; labora- 
tory, four hours. Five credits. Required in the course in agriculture; 
elective in the course in general science. Prerequisites: Agricultural 
Chemistry, Geology, and Bacteriology. 

This course comprises a study of the physical nature of soils, and 
deals with the origin of soils and their formation; soil texture as in- 
fluencing aeration, capillarity, and diffusion; soil moisture and means for 
its conservation; the washing of soils and preventive measures; the 
effect of different methods of cultivation upon the liberation of plant 
foods, soil moisture, and soil temperature; the use of tillage implements 
and their effect upon the physical condition of the soil. 

Laboratory.. — The practicums demonstrating the principles of soil 
physics are discussed in the class. 

8. — Soil Fertility. Junior year, spring term. Class work, three 
hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required in the course in 
agriculture; elective in the course in general science. Prerequisites: 
Agricultural Chemistry, Quantitative Analysis I, and Soils. 

This course involves a study of the food combinations of plants and 
the effect of different amounts of combinations of plant food upon plant 
growth; the effect of different crops and different systems of farming 
upon the. depletion of soil fertility; the use of barnyard manure, including 
proper methods of handling, preserving, and applying it; a determina- 
tion of the need of soils for commercial fertilizers and the kind of ferti- 
lizers to apply. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory exercises supplement the class work in 
demonstrating the effect of fertilizers and manures upon plant growth. 

9. — Soil Survey. Junior year, spring term. Lectures and recitations, 
two hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective in the course 
in agriculture. Prerequisite: Soils. 

This subject is pursued by lectures and recitations on the types of 
soil of the United States as classified by the Bureau of Soils, United 
States Department of Agriculture, and the adaptability of different crops 
to these soil classes. A study is also made of the soil surveys of different 
states, and especially of the soil survey of Kansas. 

Laboratory. — Field work in mapping soils comprises the laboratory 
work. 

10. — Advanced Soils. Senior year, fall term. Class work, two hours; 
laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in agricul- 
ture. Prerequisites: Geology, Soils. 

This course is a brief study of the principal soil-forming rocks and 
minerals and their influence upon the texture, physical properties and 
fertility of the soil. The various methods of determining the physical 
composition of the soil are considered. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory is a continuation of the work begun in 
Soils. 



Division of Agriculture 133 

11. — Soil Research I. Senior year, winter term. Laboratory, eight 
hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. Prerequi- 
sites: Advanced Quantitative Analysis (four credits), Soil Bacteriology, 
and Advanced Soils. 

The student taking this course pursues a definite lii?£ of laboratory 
work on some soil problem. During the winter term the work is prin- 
cipally in the greenhouse and the laboratory, but deludes assigned 
readings. In the spring term an opportunity is afforded to carry into 
the field lines of research started in the greenhouse and the laboratory. 

12. — Soil Research II. Senior year, spring term. Laboratory, eight 
hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in agriculture-. Prerequi- 
site: Soil Research I. 

This course is a continuation of Soil Research I. 

COURSES IN FARM MECHANICS 

13. — Farm Mechanics. Sophomore year, spring term. Class work, 
two hours ; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Required in the course 
in agriculture; elective in the course in general science. 

This is a beginning course in farm mechanics, taking up certain 
important definitions and mechanical principles — force, work, power, and 
the lever, eveners, tackles, etc. It includes a study of power transmission, 
belting, splicing, etc., strength of materials, tillage machinery, history, 
development and construction of plows, harrows, rollers, subsurface 
packers, cultivators, etc., and also a study of seeding, grading, harvest- 
ing, haying, threshing, guiding, and pumping machinery. 

14. — Advanced Farm Mechanics. Senior year, fall term. Lectures, 
one hour; laboratory, six hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in 
agriculture. Prerequisite: Farm Mechanics. 

Different makes of implements are compared as to simplicity of 
construction, draft, and adaptability to the purpose, for which manu- 
factured. Practical field and laboratory tests of farm machines are 
conducted with various forms of power. Appropriate instruction is given 
in the care of all classes of farm implements. 

15. — Farm Buildings and Equipment. Senior year, winter term. 
Lectures, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective 
in the course in agriculture. Prerequisite: Farm Mechanics. 

This subject involves a study of the permanent equipment and con- 
veniences of the farm, such as fences, outbuildings, cribs, barn, and 
machine sheds. The use of concrete for construction work on the farm 
will be given special attention. 

16. — Irrigation and Drainage. Senior year, spring term. Class 
work, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective in the 
course in agriculture. Prerequisites: Farm Mechanics, Soil Fertility. , 

This course involves study and field practice in the fundamentals 
common to both irrigation and drainage. Problems are given on the 
length of pace, and on the determination of distances by pacing and by 
the use of the surveyor's chain, and farm mapping. A study is made 
of drainage systems in operation. The College has a drainage system 
under way, and practical work is given the students in running levels 
and in trenching and placing tile. Each student is required to plan an 
entire drainage system and to estimate its cost. 



134 Kansas State Agricultural College 

COURSE IN FARM MANAGEMENT 

17.-—Farm Management. Senior year, winter term. Lectures and 
recitations, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required 
in the course in agriculture; elective in the course in general science. 
Prerequisites: Forage Crops, Soil Fertility. 

The purpose of this course is: first, to assemble and correlate the 
principles involved in the agricultural subjects taught in the institution; 
second, to aid the student in applying these principles to the successful 
management of a farm. Lectures are given on the points to be considered 
in the selection of a farm, on types of farming, on the planning and 
arrangement of the farmstead and of the fields and the crops; on the 
ease, cost and methods of marketing different farm products. Different 
regions are discussed with especial reference to their adaptability to 
certain types of farming. Farm records and accounts are kept. The 
labor question is analyzed. The distribution of capital, its relation to 
profit, and the relation of live stock to crop production and to the 
maintenance of a permanent agriculture, receive consideration. Rural 
conditions with respect to people, roads, schools, churches and social 
conveniences also find consideration in the course. Methods of renting 
and leasing farms are discussed, and their important points emphasized. 

Laboratory. — At the beginning of the course the student is required 
to furnish plans and inventories of his own farm or of a farm with 
which he is familiar, together with a financial record of one year's 
actual operations. The farm is then replanned in accordance with the 
principles developed in this course. Whenever practicable, neighboring 
farms are visited and studied with the idea of securing first-hand in- 
formation as to the farm plan, especially with respect to the arrange- 
ment of the fields, to the buildings, to the farmstead, and to the rotation 
of crops used. Text, Warren's Farm Management. 



Animal Husbandry 

Professor Cochjsl 

Assistant Professor McCampbell 

Assistant Professor 

Instructor Vestal 
Assistant Lewis 
Assistant Blizzard 
Assistant Gatewood 
Assistant Paters on 
Assistant Vanderwilt 

The Department of Animal Husbandry owns about 140 acres of land 
and rents 460 acres for the maintenance of herds and flocks of pure-bred 
horses, cattle, sheep, and hogs. The College live stock has attained a 
national reputation among breeders and feeders on account of the many 
prize-winning animals produced. 

The feed yards and barns are well arranged for experimental feeding 
and the maintenance of the herds. The laboratory of the animal hus- 
bandry student is, as a matter of fact, the feed yard and the animal. He 
studies the animal from the standpoint of the breeder and of the feeder, 
and learns to combine the needs of each and to find these qualities ex- 
emplified in the perfect animal. 

The courses of study in this department are so arranged as to give 
the student special instruction in the selection, breeding, feeding, market- 
ing and management of all classes of live stock. Attention is also given 
to the sanitary conditions and treatment of the more common forms of 
disease to which the animals are subject. 



Division of Agriculture 135 

COURSES IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

1.— tMarket Types and Classes. Freshman year, fall term. Class 
work, one hour; laboratory, six hours. Four credits. Eequired in the 
course in agriculture; elective in the course in industrial journalism and 
in the course in general science. 

This course consists of a study of the market types and classes of 
horses, cattle, sheep, and swine. Text, Craig's Live-stock Judging. 

Laboratory. — Practice in scoring and judging animals. 

2. — Breeding Types and Classes. Freshman year, winter term. 
Class work, one hour; laboratory, six hours. Four credits. Required in 
the course in agriculture ; elective in the courses in general science, veteri- 
nary medicine, and industrial journalism. Prerequisite: Market Types 
and Classes. 

This course consists of a study of the types and classes of horses, cattle, 
sheep, and swine from the standpoint of both grade and pure-bred animals 
used for breeding purposes. Text, Craig's Live-stock Judging. 

Laboratory. — Practice is given in scoring and judging breeding ani- 
mals. 

3. — Breeding Types I. Freshman year, spring term. Class work, one 
hour; laboratory, six hours. Four credits. Special course for veterinary 
students only. Prerequisite: Market Types and Classes. 

This course consists of a study of the more important breeds of horses, 
beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, and swine. One-third of the time required 
in this course is devoted to the study of dairy cattle, during which time 
the class is in charge of the Department of Dairy Husbandry. Text, 
Craig's Live-stock Judging. 

Laboratory. — Practice is given in scoring and in judging. 

4. — Principles of Feeding. Sophomore year, spring term. Lecture, 
two hours; recitation, two hours. Four credits. Required in the course 
in agriculture and in the course in veterinary medicine. Prerequisites: 
Market Types and Classes; Breeding Types and Classes. 

This course involves a study of the digestive system and the processes 
of nutrition, and of the theory of practical economy of rations, both for 
the maintenance and for the fattening of all classes of farm animals. 

5. — History of Breeds and Pedigrees. Junior year, fall term. Class 
work, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective in the 
course in agriculture. Prerequisite: Principles of Feeding. 

A study is made of the early history and development of pure-bred 
domestic animals; also a sufficient study of herd books and pedigrees to 
acquaint students with the leading strains and families of the different 
breeds of horses, cattle, sheep, and swine. Text, Plumb's Types and 
Breeds. 

6. — Live-stock Management I. Junior year, fall term. Laboratory, 
four hours. Two credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. 

Practice is given in the feeding, care, and management of cattle 
and hogs. 

7. — Principles of Animal Breeding. Junior year, winter term. 
Class work, four hours. Four credits. Required in the course in agricul- 
ture and in the course in veterinary medicine. Prerequisites: Zoology I, 
II, and III; Embryology. 

This course embraces the general study of the principles of breeding, 
including a study of selection, variation, heredity, atavism, etc. Text, 
Davenport's Thremmatology. 



136 Kansas State Agricultural College 

8. — Pork and Mutton Production. Junior year, winter term. Class 
work, three hours. Three credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. 
Prerequisite: Principles of Feeding. 

This course comprises a systematic study of the most successful and 
economical methods of growing and finishing hogs and sheep, both for 
breeding purposes and for pork and mutton production. 

9. — Live-stock Management II. Junior year, spring term. Labora- 
tory work, four hours. Two credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. 
Prerequisite: Principles of Feeding. 

This course deals with the practical side of the feeding, care, and man- 
agement of horses and sheep. 

10. — Advanced Judging I. Junior year, spring term. Laboratory, 
four hours. Two credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. Pre- 
requisites: Market Types and Classes; Breeding Types and Classes; and 
History of Breeds and Pedigrees. 

This course deals with the judging of market classes as well as with 
all of the different breeds of pure-bred stock. The stock is judged in 
groups of from four to six animals in the same manner that is customary 
at county or state fairs. 

11. — Advanced Judging II. Senior year, fall term. Laboratory, four 
hours. Two credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. Prerequisite: 
Advanced Judging I. 

This is a continuation of Advanced Judging I. During the work of 
the term, occasional trips are made to the best live-stock farms of the 
state, where the students have an opportunity to judge and to observe the 
management of herds and flocks as handled by the most successful stock- 
men of the state. 

12. — Breeding Pure-bred Live Stock. Senior year, fall term. Two 
credits.. Prerequisite: Advanced Judging I. 

The practices in breeding pure-bred live stock are here studied. 

13. — Meats. Senior year, winter term. Class work, one hour; labora- 
tory, two hours. Two credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. Pre- 
requisites: Principles of Feeding; Principles of Animal Breeding. 

This course includes a study of the killing, dressing, cutting, and 
curing of beef, pork, and mutton. 

14. — Beef Production. Senior year, spring term. Class work, two 
hours. Two credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. Prerequisite: 
Advanced Judging I. 

This course is devoted to a study of the most successful and economical 
methods of producing beef cattle for market. "Various rations, compari- 
sons of long and short feeds, the advisability of grain and of grass feed, 
and all questions pertaining to the production of beef are considered. 

15. — Horse Production. Senior year, spring term. Class work, three 
hours. Three credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. Prerequi- 
site: Principles of Feeding. 

This course involves a study of the most successful methods of growing 
and developing young horses and mules and of the most satisfactory 
rations for horses, together with an investigation of the best methods of 
preparing horses for market. 

16. — Animal Husbandry Seminar. Senior year, spring term. One 
credit. Prerequisites: History of Breeds and Pedigrees, Breeding Pure- 
bred Live Stock. 



Division of Agriculture 137 



Dairy Husbandry. 

Professor Reed 
Instructor Fitch 
Instructor Gilbert 
Assistant Tomson 

The College dairy farm, including the buildings and yards, consists of 
about seventy acres of medium upland. This land is used for growing 
corn, alfalfa, and other crops, such as cowpeas, field peas, and sorghum, 
and for the pasture of the dairy herd. 

The barn is built on the most approved model for the housing of 
dairy cattle, and is light, well-ventilated, and sanitary, with stalls for 
seventy cows. Three silos of modern type, feed rooms, a milk room, a 
boiler room, and a laboratory exist in connection with the barn. Each 
of these illustrates some especially desirable feature in dairy building and 
construction. 

The dairy herd consists of excellent types of the four dairy breeds: 
Jersey, Guernsey, Ayrshire, arid Holstein. These animals are pure-bred 
and a number have been entered in the advanced registry of their re- 
spective breeds. The excellence of the dairy herd is shown by an average 
production for the past year of over 400 pounds of butter by the Guern- 
seys, 475 pounds by the Ayrshires, over 500 pounds by the Jerseys, and 
572 pounds by the Holsteins. Maid Henry, a thirteen-year-old Holstein, 
produced 19,600 pounds of milk, yielding 835 pounds of butter in one year. 
The Owl's Design ranks high among the Jerseys of the world, with a 
record of 14,606 pounds of milk produced in one year. She has also pro- 
duced 758 pounds" of butter in a year. 

The dairy building houses the creamery, the cheese rooms, the class- 
rooms, and the offices, and the necessary laboratories for testing and 
hand-separator work. Refrigeration is secured from a small refrigerat- 
ing machine and ice plant installed in the building. These facilities of 
barn, herd, and laboratories are in constant use by the students of dairy- 
ing. The instruction in dairy husbandry includes the study of the selec- 
tion and breeding of dairy animals, the production of milk, its manu- 
facture into butter, cheese, and other dairy products, or its sale on the 
market. 

COURSES IN DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

1. — Elements op Dairying. Sophomore year, spring term. Class 
work, two hours ; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Required in the 
course in agriculture; elective in the course in general science. 

This is a general course in dairying, dealing with the secretion, com- 
position and properties of milk, with the factors influencing the quantity 
and quality of milk, and with the care of milk and cream on the farm. 
It includes a study of the different methods of creaming, the construction 
and operation of farm separators, the principles and application of the 
Babcock test, the use of the lactometer, and butter making on the farm. 
Lectures, supplemented by text, Wing's Milk and Its Products. 

Laboratory. — Practice is given in operating the Babcock test and lac- 
tometer, separation of milk, and farm butter making. 



138 Kansas State Agricultural College 

2. — Dairy Judging. Freshman year, spring term. Laboratory, four 
hours. Two credits. Required in the course in agriculture and in the 
course in veterinary medicine ; elective in the course in general science. 

This course calls for the judging of dairy stock from the standpoint 
of economical production and breed type. Score cards are used for the 
purpose of training the student to become accurate, thorough and sys- 
tematic in the selection of animals as representatives of breeds or for 
breeding purposes. No textbook is required. Type's and Breeds of Farm 
Animals, by C. S. Plumb, and Breed Association literature are used as 
references. 

3. — Breeding Types I. Freshman year, spring term. Required in the 
course in veterinary medicine. 

One-third of this course, which is described more fully under the De- 
partment of Animal Husbandry, is given by members of the Department 
of Dairy " Husbandry, and comprises the judging and scoring of dairy 
•cattle. 

4. — Dairy Inspection I. Junior year, spring term. Class work, 
one hour; laboratory, two hours. Two credits. Elective in the course 
in agriculture. Prerequisites: General Bacteriology; Chemistry D-I 
and D-II. 

Advanced work is given in the testing of dairy products, including test- 
ing for adulterations. Practice is given in the use of score cards for in- 
specting and grading milk depots, dairy farms, and creameries. The 
course is designed to give training in the duties of a city, state, or govern- 
ment inspector or commissioner. State and city ordinances governing 
the handling and public sale of dairy products are outlined. Text, Far- 
rington and Woll's Testing Milk and Its Products. 

5. — Pure-bred Dairy Cattle. Junior year, fall term. Class work, 
two hours; laboratory, two hours. Three credits. Elective in the course 
in agriculture. 

Lectures are given on the origin, history, and development of breeds 
of dairy cattle, their distribution, and their distinctive characteristics. 

Laboratory. — This work consists of a study of methods of registering 
animals, and of practice in tracing and making pedigrees and in keeping 
advanced registry records. 

6. — Milk Production and Herd Management. Junior year, winter 
term. Class work, three hours. Three credits. Elective in the course in 
agriculture. Prerequisite: Principles of Feeding. 

This course deals with the economical production of milk and with the 
most approved methods of handling a dairy herd. Special attention is 
given to breeding, feeding, keeping herd records, forming test associa- 
tions, and organizing plans for improvement of quality of dairy cattle. 

7. — Butter Making and Creamery Management. Senior year, fall 
term. Class work, three hours; laboratory, four hours. Five credits. 
Elective in the course in agriculture. 

This course comprises a study of the principles of creamery butter 
making, the construction and care of creameries and their appliances, 
methods of sampling and grading cream, pasteurization, starter making, 
cream ripening, and creamery accounting. Text, McKay and Larson's 
Principles and Practice of Butter Making. 

Laboratory. — Practice is given in the sampling and grading of milk 
and cream; in separating and ripening cream; in the preparation and 
use of the starter in pasteurized and in raw cream; in churning; in 
working, washing, salting, and packing butter; and in keeping complete 
records of each operation. The work also includes the making of salt, 
fat, and moisture determinations of the finished product, and judging and 
scoring butter. 



Division of Agriculture 139 

8. — Cheese and Ice-cream Making. Senior year, spring term. Class 
work, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective in the 
course in agriculture. Prerequisites: Chemistry D-I and D-II; Dairy 
Bacteriology. 

This course includes the making of cheese on the farm for home use 
and for sale, and the commercial manufacture of Cheddar cheese, com- 
prising each detail from the receipt of the milk to the marketing of the 
finished product. The cheese work is given in the first half of the term; 
the manufacture and handling of ice cream and ices for the retail and 
wholesale trade, in the second half. Text, Van Slyke-Publow's The Science 
and Practice of Cheese Making. 

Laboratory. — Practice is given in making cheese under farm con- 
ditions and on a commercial scale. Records are kept of the different 
operations, and their influence upon the finished product is noted. Ex- 
ercises are given in testing, judging, and scoring cheese. The latter 
half of the term is devoted to the making of ice cream and ices. 

9. — Dairy Buildings and Equipment. Junior year, spring term. 
Class work, two hours. Two credits. Elective in the course in agricul- 
ture. 

This work consists in drawing plans for the construction of dairy 
barns, storage barns, silos, milk rooms, dairies, ice houses, fences, and 
shelters, and in planning and laying out dairy plants for special purposes. 

10. — Advanced Dairy Judging. Elective, spring term. Laboratory, 
two hours. One credit. 

This course is a continuation of Live Stock III. Visits are made to 
the best dairy farms in the State, and students are given an opportunity 
to judge and to handle stock kept by the most successful breeders. 

11.— Dairy Seminar. Elective, spring term. Class work, two hours. 
Two credits. Prerequisites: Courses 1, 4, 5, and 6. 

This course includes a study and review of dairy periodicals and ex- 
periment station bulletins, books, and other dairy literature. 

12. — Dairy Inspection II. Senior year, spring term. Laboratory, 
four hours. Two credits. Required in the course in veterinary medicine. 

This course comprises the testing of dairy products, the inspection and 
scoring of dairies and milk depots, and the testing for adulterants in dairy 
products. Text, Farrington and WolPs Testing Milk and Its Products. 

13— Home Dairying. Elective, winter term. Class work, two hours; 
laboratory, four hours. This course extends over half a term and 
carries two credits. For young women only; elective in the course in 
home economics. 

This course includes a study of the composition of milk, Babcock test- 
ing, separation of milk, cream ripening, and farm butter making; also 
a brief study of the breeds of dairy cattle. This course is given with the 
elective course in Home Poultrying, offered by the Department of Poultry 
Husbandry in the first half of the term. 



140 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Forestry 

Poiester Scott 

The Department of Forestry, established by authority of an act of 
the legislature in 1909, is in charge of forestry extension and investiga- 
tions throughout the State, and of the College instruction in these sub- 
jects. 

The great importance to State and nation of conserving the present 
area of woodland and of adding to it by plantings upon every farm is 
universally acknowledged. The direct value to the farm of supplies of 
posts, poles, and fuel is readily computed, but the value to the State of 
these timber areas in the protection to soil, conservation of moisture, 
and improved landscape effect, is even more important in the agricul- 
tural welfare of the State and of the citizen. 

COURSES IN FORESTRY 

1. — Farm Forestry. Senior year, winter term. Class work, three 
hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required in the course in 
agriculture; elective in the course in general science. 

This course covers, in a general way, the propagation of forest trees; 
nursery methods and practices; the cultivation and care of trees in 
farm wood-lots; the preparation of planting plans for farm wood-lots; 
a detailed study of trees suitable for such planting in the various parts 
of the State; the value of the timber crop; the composition and location 
of windbreaks, their value in the protection of growing crops and in 
the conservation of soil moisture. The class work is given by means of 
lectures and mimeographed notes. 

2. — Dendrology. Elective, winter term. Class work, one hour; labo- 
ratory, two hours. Two credits. Elective in the courses in agriculture 
and general science. 

This course takes up the classification and identification of forest trees 
growing on the campus and in the vicinity of Manhattan, by means of 
bud and twig characteristics, as well as by leaf, flower, and fruit char- 
acteristics. 

3. — Silviculture. Elective, winter term. Class work, two hours; 
field work, two hours. Three credits. Elective in the course in agri- 
culture and elsewhere. Prerequisites: Farm Forestry; Dendrology. 

A study is made of the forest regions of the United States; the com- 
mercial range of the important economic species, their soil and climatic 
requirements; forest types; tolerance and intolerance of trees; factors 
determining reproduction and rate of growth; the protection of forests 
against injury by fires, winds, and insects, including the application of 
several silvicultural systems. 



Division of Agriculture 141 



Horticulture 

Professor Dickers 
Associate Professor Aheaen 
Assistant Lewis 
Assistant Mekrill 

A wealth of illustrative material for classes in all horticultural sub- 
jects is found in the large collection of species growing upon the College 
campus, in the orchard plantations, and in the greenhouses. The new 
greenhouses have added greatly to the possibility of effective laboratory 
work. 

The horticultural grounds consist of eighty acres of land devoted ex- 
clusively to horticultural and forestry work and gardens, and to nurseries. 
Orchards and vineyards are maintained for experimental and demon- 
strative work. A full equipment of tools, spraying machinery, and spe- 
cial apparatus used in horticulture, floriculture and gardening is avail- 
able for the use of the students. The College grounds furnish one of the 
finest laboratories in the State for the study of landscape gardening. 

The instruction in the Department of Horticulture covers fruit judg- 
ing, plant propagation, pomology, gardening, small fruits, spraying, 
orcharding, and landscape gardening. The following descriptions give 
detailed accounts of the instruction in these various fields. 

COURSES IN HORTICULTURE 

1. — Plant Propagation. Sophomore year, spring term. Class work, 
three hours; laboratory, four hours. Five credits. Required in the 
course in agriculture; elective in the course in general science. Prerequi- 
site: Plant Anatomy. 

A discussion of natural and cultural methods of propagation; seeds, 
seed testing, and seed growing; the treatment required for different 
kinds of seeds, the production of seedlings for stock; grafting, budding, 
layering; the making of cuttings, and the special requirements for 
propagating commercial fruits and ornamental plants. The work is 
given by means of lecturas and assigned readings. 

Laboratory. — Practical work is given in the preparation of seeds and 
in seed testing; in the preparation of seed-beds, and the use of seeding 
machinery; in transplanting, grafting, budding, and in general nursery 
practice. 

2. — Pomology I. Junior year, fall term. Laboratory, four hours. 
Two credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. 

The course comprises exercises in grading and packing fruit, in select- 
ing specimens, and in the preparation of exhibits; identification and de- 
scription of varieties; identification of diseases and of injuries which 
damage storage fruits. 

3. — Kitchen Gardening. Senior year, fall term. Class work, two 
hours. Two credits. Required in the course in home economics. 

Lectures are given on the requirements for home-grown vegetables and 
other plants; on soils, fertilizers, and seeds; on the planting, cultivation, 
and needs of various groups of species. 

4. — Small Fruits. Junior year, spring term. Class work, two hours. 
Two credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. Prerequisite: Plant 
Propagation. 



142 Kansas State Agricultural College 

The small fruits of commercial importance are considered with refer- 
ence to their requirements as to soil, fertilizers, cultivation, and pro- 
tection. The management of small areas designed to furnish a supply of 
fruits for home use, and the handling of commercial plantations, are 
considered. 

5. — Ornamental Gardening. Senior year, spring term. Class work, 
two hours. Two credits. Required in the course in home economics. 

Lectures are given on the principles of landscape art and their appli- 
cation to the problems of lawns, yards, country homes, and school 
grounds. Opportunity is afforded for an acquaintance with the species 
used for obtaining the best results. 

6. — Advanced Pomology. Senior year, fall term. Class work, three 
hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in 
agriculture. Prerequisite: Pomology I. 

The course comprises a detailed study of systems of classification, 
natural and artificial, and of the influence of conditions and culture upon 
variation. Systems of description and nomenclature are treated. Text, 
Waugh's Systematic Pomology. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work consists of identification and de- 
scription of varieties; observations on variations in specimens grown in 
different localities and under varying conditions. 

7. — Principles of Orcharding. Senior year, winter term. Class 
work, three hours. Three credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. 
Prerequisites: Plant Propagation; Advanced Pomology. 

This course consists of a discussion of the conditions necessary for 
success with orchards, including location, improvements of soil, applica- 
tion of fertilizers, pruning. Text, Bailey's Principles of Fruit Growing. 

8. — Spraying. Senior year, winter term. Class work, one hour ; labo- 
ratory, four hours. Three credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry I and II. 

Practice is given in preparing spray mixtures, and in the use of 
spraying machinery. 

9. — Orchard Management. Class work, two hours; laboratory, four 
hours. Four credits. 

This is a detailed study of the capital and equipment necessary for 
the handling of orchards of varying age and size, and of requirements of 
marketing, storage, and by-products. 

10. — Market Gardening. Senior year, spring term. Class work, two 
hours; laboratory, two hours. Three credits. Elective in the course in 
agriculture. 

This course comprises a study of the 'problems and possibilities of the 
market garden, the necessary equipment, and soil requirements therefor; 
the value and cost of fertilizers. Text, Bailey's Principles of Vegetable 
Gardening. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work consists of the preparation of plans 
for gardens; seed testing; the construction of the hotbed; the use of 
tools and machines; observations on the growth of crops; management 
of hotbeds and forcing houses. 

11. — Landscape Gardening. Senior year, spring term. Class work, 
two hours; laboratory, two hours. Three credits. Elective in the course 
in horticulture, and in the course in general science. 

This course is a study of the ideals of landscape work, and the means 
adopted to secure the best results in lawns, parks, public grounds, and 
cemeteries. Text, Waugh's Landscape Gardening. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work is in making plans for plantings of 
various types, including lawns, parks, and cemeteries. 



Division of Agriculture 143 

12. — Landscape Plans and Materials. Elective. Class work, two 
hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. 

This elective deals with plans for street planting, the ornamentation 
of school grounds, city parks, and home grounds. A thorough study is 
made of landscape principles that apply to civic improvement. 

Laboratory. — There are field trips, and the students are required to 
familiarize themselves with the more common varieties of flowers, shrubs, 
and trees. 

13. — Greenhouse Construction and Management. Class work, four 
hours. 

This course consists of a term's work covering the more important 
points of greenhouse construction and the proper methods of conducting 
the greenhouse business. Not only is this subject treated from the com- 
mercial standpoint, but the management of private conservatories is also 
carefully studied. 

14. — School Gardening. Elective, spring term. Class work, two 
hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. 

The object of this course is to give teachers a knowledge of the prin- 
ciples which underlie success in gardening and the adaptation of small 
areas to the production of vegetables and, flowers. The subjects of soil 
preparation, seed selection, fertilizers, hotbeds, plant manipulation, and 
the planning of the garden are given special consideration. Opportunity 
is given for teachers to become familiar with general garden methods and 
the use and manipulation of garden tools, including seeders, weeders and 
wheel hoes. Allotments of ground areas required for different crops, 
the length of time required for different crops, the length of time re- 
quired to mature various vegetable and flower crops, the adaptation of 
these to country and city schools, and suggestions for marketing are 
among the subjects considered. 



Milling Industry 

Professor Fitz 
Assistant Dtjnton 
Miller Leefer 

The Department of Milling Industry was primarily established by the 
Board of Regents to undertake investigations in the handling, marketing 
and milling of wheat. Every student of agriculture should have some 
knowledge of this subject, and also of the handling of grain products 
other than those obtained from wheat. A full and complete knowledge 
of the needs of grain growing as an industry must necessarily include 
the utilization of grains in the manufacture of food, together with the 
natural by-products resulting therefrom. 

The department has a well-equipped plant, consisting of six double- 
stand 7" x 14" rolls, with necessary cleaning machinery and dust col- 
lectors, sifters, and purifiers. The results secured here are comparable 
with those from a regular commercial mill. A baking laboratory 
equipped with proofing closet, dough mixer, and electric ovens is open for 
student use, as is also a laboratory for chemical tests on wheat and flour. 

1. — Commercial Grain and Grain Inspection. Junior year, fall 
term. Class work, three hours ; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. 
Prerequisite: Grain Crops. 

This course includes a study of methods of handling, storing, market- 
ing, and grading of grain; the history of the origin and development of 



144 Kansas State Agricultural College 

grain inspection and grades ; the classification and organization of inspec- 
tion systems ; the organization and functions of grain exchanges or boards 
of trade; and principal grain markets, with receipts, shipments, and 
consumption. 

Laboratory. — Actual practice in grading samples, determining dockage, 
and studying the kinds of damage in commercial grains, with relation to 
their effect on market value. 

2. — Grain Products. Junior year, winter term. Class work, three 
hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Prerequisite: Commercial 
Grain and Grain Inspection. 

A brief study of the methods of manufacturing food products from 
cereals, with the resulting bjr-products, and a comparison of composition 
and feeding value of these by-products. 

Laboratory, — A study is made of actual samples of most important 
cereal food products and by-products. 

3. — Experimental Milling. Junior year, spring term. Laboratory, 
four hours. Two credits. Prerequisite : Grain Products. 

This course includes a study of the theory and practice of milling, with 
demonstrations on a small experimental mill. 

4. — Advanced Experimental Milling. Senior year, fall term. Lab- 
oratory, eight hours. Four credits. Prerequisite : Experimental Milling. 

This course consists of practice in the art of milling, with demonstra- 
tions on model mill. 

5. — Wheat and Flour Testing. Senior year, winter term. Class 
work, one hour; laboratory, six hours. Four credits. Prerequisites: 
Grain Products, and six credit hours of Quantitative Analysis. 

This course includes special quantitative tests applied to cereals and 
their by-products; methods for analysis and interpretation of results. 

6. — Experimental Baking Tests. Senior year, spring term. Labora- 
tory, eight hours. Four credits. Prerequisite : Wheat and Flour Testing. 

This course includes practice in making tests; comparison of methods, 
formulas, and flour; and interpretation of results. 

7. — Milling Practice. Senior year, spring term. Laboratory, eight 
hours. Four credits. Prerequisite: Advanced Experimental Milling. 
This course is a continuation of Advanced Experimental Milling. 



Poultry Husbandry 

Professor Lippincott 
Superintendent Harris 

The new poultry plant is situated just north of the northeast corner of 
the College campus. The plant occupies eight acres, and is devoted to the- 
breeding and rearing of the stock used for class work. It is equipped 
with different types of incubators, brooders, houses and runs, and with 
flocks of the leading breeds of fowls. 

There is in the government and state experiment stations, and in 
schools and colleges, an increasing demand for men with experience and 
systematic training in poultry. There is likewise a growing demand for 
men capable of managing poultry farming enterprises of considerable 
proportions, or of entering the commercial branches of the work. 



Division of Agriculture 145 

COURSES IN POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

1. — Poultry Management. Freshman year, winter term. Lectures, 
two hours. Two credits. Required in the course in veterinary medicine. 

This course takes up the general problems of poultry practice, and 
pays particular attention to the relation of these problems to the main- 
tenance of health. 

2. — Farm Poultry Production. Junior year, spring term. Class 
work, two hours ; laboratory, two hours. Three credits. Required in the 
agricultural course; elective in the course in general science. 

This course takes up the problems of poultry management on the 
general farm. The subjects of feeding, breeding, incubating, brooding 
and marketing are studied. 

3. — Practice in Poultry Feeding. Elective, spring term. Three 
times a day, seven days a week, for a period of four weeks, at hours out- 
side the regular schedule. One credit. 

This course consists of the actual care of a flock of fowls by the stu- 
dent, under supervision of an instructor. Careful record is kept of the 
feeds used and the eggs produced. A financial statement is required at 
the end of the feeding period. 

4.— Practice in Incubation. Elective, spring term. Three times a 
day, seven days a week, for a period of four weeks. One credit. 

This course consists in the care of an incubator by the student through 
the incubation period, testing the eggs, and bringing off the hatch. Care- 
ful records of fertility, cost of incubation, etc., are kept. 

5. — Practice in Brooding. Elective, spring term. Three times a day, 
seven days a week, for a period of four weeks, at hours outside the regular 
schedule. One credit. 

In this course each student handles a flock of chicks. He has the 
entire care of brooding and feeding them during the four most critical 
weeks. A report of cost of fuel and feed, of gain in weight, and of mor- 
tality, is required. This course must be preceded or accompanied by 
Practice in Incubation. 

6. — Practice in Candling. Elective, fall term. Laboratory, two 
hours. One credit. 

This course consists in making a first-hand study of the commercial 
grades of eggs. Particular attention is given to those forms of deteriora- 
tion found in Kansas, including blood rings, spots, heats, and green 
whites, which are likely to be overlooked by egg buyers. A study is also 
made of the relative deterioration of fertile and infertile eggs. 

7. — Practice in Milk Feeding. Elective, fall term. Twice a day, 
seven days a week for a period of four weeks, at hours outside of the 
regular schedule. One credit. 

This course consists in force fattening poultry by means of crates. 
The time will be divided into periods of two weeks each, so that the stu- 
dent will have an opportunity to fatten two lots of birds. A financial 
statement is required. 

8. — Home Poultrying. Elective, division of home economics, winter 
term, open only for women. Class work, four hours for the first half of 
the term. Two credits. 

This course takes up the problems of poultry management for egg and 
meat production. The subjects of feeding, breeding, incubating, brooding, 
and marketing are studied. It is given with the elective course in home 
dairying offered by the department of dairy husbandry, in the last half 
of the term. 



146 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Agricultural Extension 

Dean Miller 

1. — Agricultural Extension. Elective, spring term. Class work, 
two hours; laboratory, two hours. Three credits. Elective for seniors 
in the course in agriculture. 

This is a brief course which considers the agricultural needs and con- 
ditions of the State, and methods to be employed to meet them; the or- 
ganizations now existing or to be organized. In this course are studied the 
methods employed in this and other states and countries to meet special 
conditions peculiar to different climates and civilizations. 



Veterinary Medicine 

Professor Sohoenleber 
Professor Goss 
Professor Dykstra 
Assistant Professor Burt 
Instructor ROGERS 
Assistant Haslam 
Assistant Christian 
Assistant Franklin 
Assistant Kennedy- 
Assistant Hobbs v 
Assistant Kirkpatrick: 
Assistant Benner \/ 

The Department of Veterinary Medicine gives most of the technical 
work in the course in veterinary medicine, a general description of which 
is given elsewhere. The department is housed in the Veterinary Building, 
which was erected at a cost of over $60,000 and is thoroughly equipped 
throughout. It contains modern classrooms, and its laboratories possess 
the necessary appliances for illustrating the several subjects required. 
The mode of instruction is more specifically detailed in succeeding sections. 

The courses in anatomy require several lecture rooms, which contain 
models, skeletons, and bones of all kinds, and a thoroughly sanitary dis- 
secting room equipped with all of the latest materials necessary to give a 
course in anatomy second to none on the continent. The dissecting ma- 
terials are furnished by the department free of charge. 

For work in histology and pathology the department is exceedingly 
well provided. It has over thirty large microscopes, equipped with both 
high and low power, and several oil immersion objectives, microtomes, the 
best reflectoscope and projectoscope obtainable, besides a large assort- 
ment of histological and pathological slides, materials, and specimens for 
use in demonstration work in class and laboratory. 

The equipment for instruction in physiology is ample to give the stu- 
dent a thoroughly comprehensive course of laboratory study. 

For the study of materia medica and pharmacy there is a general phar- 
macy laboratory containing all the drugs used in the practice of veter- 
inary medicine, and a practicing pharmacy where medicines are com- 
pounded for the every-day practice connected with the College. 

For instruction in surgery and clinic the equipment is excellent. The 
surgical amphitheater is an annex to the main Veterinary Building, seat- 
ing over three hundred people, and equipped with every modern appliance 



Division of Agriculture 147 

for performing before the classes the most delicate operations upon both 
large and small animals. The hospital has a capacity of about thirty- 
animals and is nearly always filled with patients, which gives ample ma- 
terial for the study of internal medicine as well. The out-clinic furnishes 
several thousand cases yearly, giving the student opportunity to become 
familiar with the diseases and their treatment under the guidance of 
proficient practitioners. 

The policy adhered to in the instruction in all the departments is that 
the science of veterinary medicine is the foundation, and the art merely 
supplementary. A thorough drill is given in the foundation studies, and 
later in the course practical application of these is made in actual field 
work. This results in a thoroughly scientific veterinary education. 

COURSES IN ANATOMY 

A few years ago there was inaugurated an entirely different method of 
anatomical instruction, hitherto untried in any school of human or vet- 
erinary medicine, and its success was so marked that it has become a 
permanent feature of the teaching of the department. Anatomy I, in- 
cluding dissection, takes up the bones of the trunk, L e., the vertebrae, ribs, 
sternum, and pelvis. The ligaments which hold these bones together are 
next considered, and are followed immediately by a study of the muscles 
of the trunk, which inclose the abdominal and thoracic cavities. The 
student is now ready to fill in and locate properly, and to study thoroughly, 
the important organs in these two body cavities. This work is immediately 
followed by the study of the blood supply of these organs, and this in 
turn by the study of the nerve supply controlling them, including that of 
the spinal cord, the vessels and nerves being carried to their point of 
exit from the trunk. 

After the completion of Anatomy I of this course, the student has 
actually seen and dissected every essential organ in its gross anatomy, 
and to some extent in its microscopic. He is now thoroughly prepared 
for the study of histology, after which follows physiology, or the func- 
tional study of organs, and the details of their cell structure. 

The limbs, the main functions of which are locomotion, are, together 
with the head and neck, usually in need of surgical rather than of medic- 
inal treatment in veterinary practice. The practitioner, therefore, re- 
quires an extremely accurate knowledge of these parts, and when this 
anatomical study is brought closer in point of time to the study of surgery 
concerned, its practical application emphasizes the essential facts most 
effectively. By mutual consent, the dissection by one class occurs every 
morning at seven o'clock, thus giving higher classmen who desire to 
specialize in anatomy an opportunity to review the work, and to demon- 
strate by working with and by assisting the under classmen. 

Before dissecting the ligaments and muscles of any part, the student 
is required to study them upon a mounted skeleton, thus ascertaining the 
exact points at which they attach to the bones. He then goes over the 
same muscles and ligaments on the Azoux model, afterwards dissecting 
them and proving the facts already learned, thereby acquiring a perfect 
mental picture of the animal body. 



148 Kansas State Agricultural College 

In Anatomy I, II, III, and IV each student is required to pass one 
perfect examination upon the origins and insertions of all the equine 
muscles of the part dissected, and he is marked, not upon the degree of 
perfection of the examination, but upon whether perfection • was accom- 
plished in the first, second, third, or fourth trial. He must also give a 
satisfactory tree outline of the circulatory and nervous systems, showing 
their distribution and branches, and their relationships. A satisfactory 
knowledge of the nerve supply of each muscle and of each cutaneous area 
is required. 

In the winter term of the freshman year the class is divided into two 
equal sections, one half studying the anterior limb, in Anatomy II, and 
the other half studying the posterior limb, in Anatomy III, while the 
reverse arrangement is followed in the spring term. 

The dissecting room is situated in the basement of the Veterinary 
Building, and possesses the best of sanitary and other equipment. The 
instruction in the classroom consists of quizzes, recitations, special dis- 
sections of the part under discussion, and a study of the Azoux model of 
the horse. Mounted skeletons and limbs and loose bones are abundant 
in the museum. 

The subjects for dissection are preserved by the injection of a formalde- 
hyde solution, followed by a red-starch solution that hardens within and 
fills the arteries. The veins are similarly treated with a bluish medium. 
The subjects are further preserved by immersion in a large concrete tank 
containing 15,000 pounds ol solution specially prepared for this purpose. 
McFadgean's Osteology and Anatomy of the Horse is required in Anatomy 
I, II, III, and IV; Sisson's Veterinary Anatomy is required in addition in 
Anatomy V and VI, but those students who can afford it are urged to 
purchase both at the beginning of the course. 

1. — Anatomy I. Freshman year, fall term. Class work, one hour; 
dissection, eleven hours. Six and one-half credits. Required in the course 
in veterinary medicine; elective in other courses. 

The course consists of supplemental lectures, demonstrations, and 
quizzes upon the bones, ligaments, and muscles; splanchnology, angiology, 
and neurology of the trunk, including the introductory work to each of 
these divisions of systematic anatomy. Textbook, Osteology and Anatomy 
of the Horse } by McFadgean. 

2. — Anatomy II. Freshman year, winter term. Class work, one hour; 
dissection, eleven hours. Six and one-half credits. Required in the course 
in veterinary medicine; elective in other courses. 

The course deals first with the osteology, then with the musculature 
of the head and neck, after which are considered the angiology and the 
neurology of these parts, including the brain. 

Dissection, — The course includes a very* thorough laboratory study of 
the bones of the head, collectively and individually, special reference being 
given to the teeth, sinuses, cavities, and foramina. The cephalic muscles, 
the pharynx, the guttural pouches, the ear, the eye and the tongue are 
then dissected, together with the brain. 

3. — Anatomy III. Freshman year, spring term. Class work, one 
hour; dissection, six hours. Four credits. Required in the course in 
veterinary medicine; elective in other courses. 

This comprises a review of Anatomy I, and lectures, demonstrations 
and quizzes upon the bones, ligaments, myology, neurology and angiology 
of the anterior limb, including the foot, with the exception of the digital 
vessels. 



Division of Agriculture 149 

4. — Anatomy IV. Sophomore year, fall term. Class work, one hour; 
■dissection, six hours. Four credits. Required in the course in veterinary 
medicine; elective in other courses. 

Both the class work and the dissection deal with the posterior limb in 
a manner exactly like the method employed in Anatomy II, but include 
the study of the circulation of the foot. 

5. — Anatomy V. Sophomore year, winter term. Class work, one 
hour; dissection, six hours. Four credits. Required in the course in 
veterinary medicine. Prerequisites: Anatomy I, II, III, and IV. 

A correlative review of the entire subject, is given, taking successively 
the bones, the ligaments, the muscles, the viscera, the blood vessels and 
the nerves in their entirety, and in the order here specified. The loco- 
motor, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems are then 
dealt with in such a manner as to build up a mental image of each struc- 
ture in the student's mind. 

Dissection, — In the dissecting room each division of systematic anatomy 
is taken up as a whole, each subject for dissection being preceded by 
regional and flap dissections of the principal operative areas, and by the 
isolation of the structures to be operated upon. The work also includes a 
mapping out in crayon of the important structures beneath the skin of a 
dark-colored horse. Textbook, Veterinary Anatomy, by Sisson. 

6. — Anatomy VI. Sophomore year, spring term. Class work, one 
hour; dissection, four hours. Three credits. Required in the course in 
veterinary medicine. 

This course consists of a comparative study, accompanied by work in 
dissection, of the principal structural differences in the ox, sheep, hog, 
dog, and chicken, upon the basis of the facts learned concerning the horse 
in Anatomy I, II, III, IV, and V, which are prerequisites. 

7. — Anatomy. Sophomore year, fall term. Ten hours laboratory. 
Five credits. Required fall term, sophomore, agricultural courses. 

The course is planned to give the agricultural students a general idea 
of the anatomy of farm animals, together with comparative references 
to many structures of the human body that are usually omitted in their 
general education. The course aims to aid them in understanding con- 
formations by means of the study and dissection of the structures beneath 
the skin that modify it, at the same time observing the muscles of 
locomotion and the various levers, both as regards speed and power or 
draughting. Special attention is given to a thorough study of the foot, 
to enable the student to understand its care and shoeing. Considerable 
time is given to the digestive organs, to give the student a clear con- 
ception of the known physiologico-anatomical phases of feeding, diges- 
tion, nutrition, and metabolism. Text and laboratory guide, Osteology 
and Anatomy of the Horse, by McFadgean. 

COURSES IN HISTOLOGY 

Lectures and recitations cover the work, which is done, in the labora- 
tory. During the lectures the projectoscope is used to illustrate the 
tissues studied. It is essential that the student obtain a thorough knowl- 
edge of the manipulation of the microscope, of the microscopical struc- 
ture of the normal animal tissues, and of the methods of fixing, embed- 
ding, sectioning, staining and mounting tissues. This work gives the 
foundation for the study of pathological histology. Each student must 
prepare a full set of slides, from which he makes high- and low-power 
drawings. 



150 Kansas State Agricultural College 

8. — Histology I. Freshman year, winter term. Class work, two 
hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Required in the course 
in veterinary medicine, elective in the course in general science. Pre- 
requisite: Anatomy I. 

The first part of the term is spent upon the care and manipulation of 
the microscope, in the use of which the student must become proficient. 
This is followed by a microscopical examination of cotton, woolen, silk 
and linen fibers, bubbles of air, and drops of oil, to enable the student. 
to recognize these when they are accidentally mounted with the tissue. 
The fundamental tissues are next studied: epithelial tissue with regard 
to form, structure, arrangement and location; connective tissue with 
regard to structure and location, including bone development and teeth 
and their development; muscular tissue, voluntary, involuntary, and 
cardiac; nerve tissue, the structures and forms of its cells, of medullated 
and nonmedullated nerve fibers; spinal cord; the blood vessels, heart, and 
lymphatic vessels. Blood corpuscles are studied with regard to size, 
shape, and structure, including each kind of white corpuscles; and the 
method of detecting blood by examination for haemin crystals is shown. 
In this term the student studies and mounts sixty-five slides, some of 
which are teased, and many of which are sectioned in paraffin and 
celloidin. Textbook, Histology, by Stohr. 

9. — Histology II. Freshman year, spring term. Class work, two 
hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Required in the course 
in veterinary medicine; elective in the course in general science. 

This is a continuation of Histology I, beginning with the blood-form- 
ing organs, as bone-marrow, lymph glands, and spleen. The histology of 
the digestive tract is next studied, including a study of the mouth, the 
tongue, the taste buds, the parotid, the submaxillary and sublingual, the 
thyroid and thymus glands; the aesophagus; the stomachs of the dog, 
the horse and the ox; the small intestines — duodenum, jejunum, and 
ileum; the large intestines — caecum, colon, rectum, and anus. During 
this term the student stains, mounts, studies with the microscope and 
makes drawings of the above-mentioned tissues. Some of the tissues 
studied are injected with gelatin mass to bring out the blood vessels. 
Textbook, Histology, by Stohr. 

10. — Histology III. Sophomore year, fall term. Class work, two 
hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Required in the course 
in veterinary medicine; elective in the course in general science. 

This is a continuation of Histology II, and includes the microscopic 
study of the liver, the pancreas, the respiratory tract — nasal mucous 
membrane, larynx, trachea, lungs, and bronchi; the urinary organs — 
kidney, ureter, bladder, urethra; the male and female genital organs; 
the skin and its appendages; the suprarenal gland; the medulla; the 
cerebellum ; the cerebrum; the eye; and the ear. In this course the 
student prepares thirty slides. Textbook, Histology, by Stohr. 

COURSES IN PHYSIOLOGY 

The courses in physiology are divided into Comparative Physiology,, 
Animal Physiology, and Human Physiology. 

11. — Comparative Physiology I. Sophomore year, winter term. 
Class work, five hours; laboratory, four hours. Seven credits. Required 
in the course of veterinary medicine; elective in the course in general 
science. Prerequisites: Anatomy I; Chemistry I, II, III; Histology I 
and II. 

This course treats of the physiology of domestic animals, beginning 
with the study of the blood, heart, blood vessels, and continuing with 
the ductless glands and internal secretions, respiration, digestion, and 
absorption. Textbook, A Manual of Veterinary Physiology, by Fred 
Smith. 



Division of Agriculture 151 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work consists of a practical application 
of the knowledge derived in the classroom. The laboratory is equipped 
with all necessary material and apparatus to make a detailed study of the 
composition and digestive action of the saliva, gastric juice, bile, pan- 
creatic and intestinal juices. Hormones and other substances in relation 
to their influence upon the production and action of the digestive juices 
are also considered. The composition and properties of the blood are 
studied by the aid of chemical, microscopic and spectroscopic methods. 
Textbook, Halliburton's Essentials of Chemical Physiology. 

12. — Comparative Physiology II. Sophomore year, spring term. 
Class work, five hours; laboratory, four hours. Seven hours credit. 
Required in the course of veterinary medicine; elective in the course in 
general science. 

The work of this term is a continuation of Comparative Physiology I, 
and treats of the urine and urinary system, nutrition, animal heat, 
muscular and nervous symptoms, locomotion, generation and develop- 
ment, growth and decay. Textbook, Smith's A Manual of Veterinary 
Physiology. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work consists of a study of the normal 
urine, determining the composition, quantitatively as well as qualitatively. 
Tests for the detection of abnormal constitutents, such as bile, blood-sugar 
and albumen, are applied to normal and also to pathological urine. 
Microscopic examination is made for blood casts, blood, etc. The labora- 
tory work in practical physiology consists in studying the phenomena 
associated with the nervous, muscular, respiratory and circulatory sys- 
tems, and making graphic records of the same. Textbooks, Urine of the 
Horse and Man, by Fish; Practical Physiology, by Hemmeter. 

13. — Human Physiology. Sophomore year, spring term. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. Required in the course in home economics; 
elective in the course in general science. Prerequisites: Chemistry I, II, 
III; Elementary Organic Chemistry. 

The instruction consists of a study of the composition of the bones, 
blood, lymph, and all the secretions of the body, with their respective 
functions. The functions of the tissues and glands, the structure and 
functions of the digestive tract, of the respiratory tract, of the skin, of 
the nervous system and of the organs of special sense are all considered. 
The lecture room is equipped with skeletons, papier-mache manikins, 
and models of the eye, ear, etc. Demonstrations relative to the subject 
under discussion are made as often as is practicable. Textbook, Martin's 
Human Body. 

14. — Chemical and Experimental Physiology. Class work, two 
hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective. Prerequisite: 
Human or Animal Physiology. 

This course is intended to supplement the lectures in physiology, so 
that the student will make a practical application of the knowledge ob- 
tained in the classroom. It will embrace the study of the composition of 
the body tissues and of the secretions and excretions of the various glands ; 
the various enzymes and their physiological relation to the digestion of 
the food substances; absorption, assimilation, and metabolism. The com- 
position and properties of the blood will be studied by spectroscopic, mi- 
croscopic and chemical methods. Graphic records of the blood pressure 
and of the pulse, as well as of the phenomena that attend the contraction 
of muscles, will be made. Text, Halliburton's Essentials of Chemical 
Physiology. 

15. — Animal Physiology. Sophomore year, winter term. Four hours. 
Required in the course in agriculture. 

This course is intended to give the student a useful knowledge of the 
functions of the body of the various farm animals, so that he can realize 
and understand the benefits to be derived from the judicious application 



152 Kansas State Agricultural College 

of proper breeding, feeding and care of farm stock. The course includes 
the study of the composition and functions of the various digestive juices 
and the relation of the food to the production of heat, growth, and 
maintenance of health. The functions of the blood, respiratory, nervous 
and excretory systems are also carefully studied. Specimens, charts and 
various apparatus will be employed to demonstrate the facts presented 
during the lecture periods. Text, Fred Smith's Manual of Veterinary 
Physiology. 

PATHOLOGY 

The laboratory is equipped with microscopes, microtomes, paraffin 
ovens, microphotographic and projection apparatus. Each student is 
furnished with a microscope, and locker containing staining dishes and 
stains. Material is furnished the student for embedding, sectioning and 
staining tissues for microscopic study. In addition, the student is fur- 
nished many mounted slides for study, which contain the pathological le- 
sions to which the domestic animals are subject. In addition to this, the 
material from the post-mortem of animals and material sent to the College 
from over the State furnish ample material for laboratory diagnosis. 

16. — Pathology I. Junior year, fall term. Class work, five hours; 
laboratory, four hours. Seven credits. Required in the course in vet- 
erinary medicine ; elective in the course in general science. Prerequisites : 
Histology, Physiology, and Bacteriology I. 

This course in general pathology treats of the history 'of pathology, 
predisposition, immunity, congenital and inherited disease; circulatory 
disturbances — cardiac difficulties, hyperemia, hemorrhage, dropsy, oedema, 
thrombosis, embolism, and alteration of the blood; disturbances in me- 
tabolism — fever, necrosis, atrophy, cloudy swelling, fatty changes, in- 
flammation, calcification, and eoncrement formation ; and of the process of 
repair of tumors, and of functional disturbances. Text, Comparative- 
General Pathology, by Kitt. 

17. — Pathology II. Junior year, winter term. Class work, four 
hours; laboratory, six hours. Four credits. Required in the course in 
veterinary medicine; elective in the course in general science. 

This course is devoted to pathological technique: collecting, fixing, 
.hardening, embedding in celloidin and paraffin, sections of fresh, frozen, 
and embedded tissues; and a study of the method of preserving gross 
specimens. Considerable time is devoted to stains and the method of 
staining. This work is followed by special pathology,, which includes the 
macroscopic and microscopic examination of the following tissues in all 
of the pathological conditions to which they are subject: cardiac muscle, 
skeletal muscle, the liver, the kidney, the bladder, the pancreas, the lungs, 
digestive tract, the serous membranes, the vascular system, lymph nodes, 
the spleen, bone, skin, and genital organs. The students stain, mount, 
study, and make drawings of the above-mentioned tissues. Textbook, 
Pathological Histology , by Gaylord and Aschoff. 

18. — Pathology III. Junior year, spring term. Class work, four 
hours; laboratory, six hours. Seven credits. Required in the course in 
veterinary medicine; elective in the course in general science. 

This course is devoted to the pathology of the infectious diseases and 
to laboratory diagnosis. Post-mortem examinations are made on all 
animals dying in the hospital at the College barns and in the neighborhood. 
The students attend and take turn in holding the autopsy. Each student 
is expected to keep a written report of the pathological changes, also of 
the microscopic findings. The above work is done under the direction of 
the pathologist in charge. Text, Pathology of Infectious Diseases, by 
Moore. 



Division of Agriculture 153 

MATERIA MEDICA 

19. — Materia Medica I and II. Junior year, fall and winter terms. 
Class work, four hours during the fall term, and two hours during the 
winter term. 

The course includes definitions of terms, modes of action of drugs in 
general, their method and rapidity of absorption and elimination, physi- 
ological and chemical incompatibles, etc. The drugs and medicinal agents 
are grouped according to their action. The lecturer discusses the origin, 
physical properties, active constituents, and official preparations of the 
medicinal agents, 

20. — Therapeutics I and II. Junior year, winter and spring terms. 
Class work, two hours winter term, and four hours spring term. Pre- 
requisites: Materia Medica I and II. 

The student is thoroughly drilled in the physiological action of the 
various drugs, or action on the healthy animal, and the therapeutic ac- 
tion, or action on the diseased animal. A course in toxicology is included 
in this work, taking up the symptoms and treatment of poisons frequently 
encountered in veterinary practice. The science of posology, or dosage, 
is considered of the utmost importance, and a liberal amount of time is 
devoted to it, taking up the proper dose of the crude drug and its prepa- 
ration for the horse, cow, dog, cat, and swine. Reference works: Wins- 
low's Veterinary Materia Medica and Therapeutics; United States Dispen- 
satory; Wood's Therapeutics, its Principles and Practice. 

21. — Pharmacy. Junior year, fall term. Class work, one hour; lab- 
oratory, four hours. 

In the lectures the meanings of the various pharmaceutical terms are 
discussed. Various systems of weights and measures, and the conversion 
of one system into another, are taught. Official preparations and some 
unofficial ones, their strength and the mode of preparation of each, are 
studied in regular order. Particular stress is placed upon prescription 
writing, the student being taught to avoid incompatibilities, to give nouns 
the proper case ending, and to understand the meanings of certain Latin 
phrases. In the laboratory work the principles of filtration, percolation, 
hot- water and sand baths, etc., are taught. The student is required to 
prepare at least one of each of the following preparations: an infusion, 
a decoction, a tincture, a wine, a syrup, a fluid extract, a liniment, an 
emulsion, a liquor, an aqua, a spirit, a volus, an ointment, an electuary, 
and a cataplasm. In addition, a thorough course in the compounding of 
prescriptions is afforded at the clinic, where all medicines are prescribed 
and compounded by the students, under guidance of the instructor in 
charge. Reference works: U. S. Pharmacopoeia; Maltbie's Practical 
Pharmacy; Remington's Practice of Pharmacy; Fish's Exercises in 
Materia Medica and Pharmacy. 

COURSES IN SURGERY 

22. — Surgery I. Junior year, fall term. Class work and laboratory, 
three hours. 

This course includes methods of restraint; asepsis and antisepsis; 
ansethesia, both local and general; inoculations, bandaging, massage, 
controlling hemorrhage; division of tissues and the uniting of wounds; 
injections of medicines into the subcutaneous tissues, blood stream, 
trachea, spinal canal. 

23. — Surgery II. Junior year, winter term. Class work and labora- 
tory, three hours. 

This course is a continuation of Surgery I. Animal dentistry is taken 
up very thoroughly, in so far as it constitutes an important part of the 
veterinarian's work. The students have free access to a large number 
of museum specimens of abnormal teeth. Also, many dental patients are 
presented at the College hospital for treatment. 



154 Kansas State Agricultural College 

24. — Surgery III. Junior year, spring term. Class and laboratory y 
three hours. 

This course considers in regular order the surgical diseases of the 
head, neck, thorax, abdomen, stomach and bowels, urinary organs, and 
organs of generation. 

25. — Surgery IV. Senior year, fall term. Class and laboratory, three 
hours. 

During this course particular attention is paid to causes, symptoms 
and treatment of lameness. It considers in detail fractures and their re- 
duction, diseases of joints, tendons and sheaths, muscles and fascia, and 
surgical diseases of the foot. 

26. — Surgery V. Senior year, winter term. Class and laboratory,, 
three hours. 

Surgery as taught during this course includes special surgical opera- 
tions, such as neurectomies, autoplastics, desmotomies, actual cauteriza- 
tion, tenotomies, myotomies, enteroctomy and interoanastomosis, and sur- 
gery of the eye. 

27. — Surgery VI. Senior year, spring term. Class and laboratory,, 
three hours. 

This is a continuation of Surgery V. Reference books: Dollar's 
Regional Veterinary Surgery; Merillat's Veterinary Surgery, Vols. I, II,. 
and III; Williams' Surgical Operations; Fleming's Operative Veterinary 
Surgery, Parts I and II; White's Restraint of Domestic Animals. 

28. — Operative Surgery I and II. This is a laboratory course. Four 
hours a week, extending throughout the fall and winter terms of the 
senior year, are devoted to this work. 

Old horses are purchased by the department, placed on the operating 
table, anaesthetized, and over one hundred operations are performed on 
the animal. During this work the student is required to observe a careful 
technique, such as antiseptis, and, in fact, performs the operation as 
thoroughly and completely as possible. It is a very practical course and 
fits the student for surgical work in actual practice. 

29. — Horseshoeing. Two hours a week during the fall term of the 
senior year are devoted to this subject. 

The course is taught by means of lectures, recitations and demon- 
strations, taking up the various divisions in the following order: normal 
conformation in both limb and foot, the anatomy of these parts, physi- 
ological movements and correct normal shoeing. This is followed by a 
study of the proper shoeing for the correction of wry limbs and feet; 
diseases of the feet, and the relation of horseshoeing thereto. The course 
ends with a study of the shoeing of mules and oxen. Throughout the en- 
tire course the purpose is to instill' in the mind of the student normal shoe- 
ing, in order that he may be able to correct abnormalities in the foot 
and limb in so far as this can be accomplished by shoeing. Reference 
books: Lungwitz's Textbook of Horseshoeing; Dollar's Handbook of 
Horseshoeing. 

OBSTETRICS 

30. — Obstetrics. This branch is taken up both by the laboratory and 
lecture method; two hours a week of the former and four hours a week 
of the latter during the full term of the senior year. 

Physiological obstetrics opens the course, during which periods of 
oestrum and gestation, impregnation, ovulation, eutocia, etc., are dis- 
cussed. This is followed by pathological obstetrics, devoted to diseases 
of the new-born and diseases incidental to pregnancy, sterility, dystocia, 
and surgical obstetrics. The latter phase of the work is greatly assisted 
by demonstrations, during the laboratory period, on an obstetrical phan- 



Division of Agriculture 155 

torn and foetus; in addition, the College farm and surrounding agri- 
cultural territory furnish an abundance of actual material. Keference 
books: Williams' Veterinary Obstetrics; Williams' Surgical and Ob- 
stetrical Operations; De Bruin's Bovine Obstetrics; Fleming's Veterinary 
Obstetrics. 

CONFORMATION AND SOUNDNESS 

31. — Conformation and Soundness of the Horse. Two hours a 
week during the spring term of the senior year are given to this subject. 

A lecture course, during which the desirable conformation of the 
horse, together with a description of all blemishes, defects, unsoundnesses, 
faults and vices are discussed. During clinics ample opportunity is 
afforded for demonstration on the living animal. Reference books: 
Goubaux and Barrier's Exterior of the Horse; Captain Hayes' Points of 
the Horse. 

COURSES IN MEDICINE 

32. — Diagnosis. Junior year, fall term. Class work, three hours. 

This is a preparatory course to the study of medicine proper. It 
takes up in detail the different diagnostic methods employed for the 
•detection of disease, including auscultation, percussion, palpation, and 
inspection, and also treats of the normal and abnormal abdominal and 
thoracic sounds, and considers in detail the specific examination of the 
various organs, including diagnostic inoculations as an aid to the de- 
tection of disease. 

33. — Medicine I. Junior year, winter term. Class work, three hours. 

A study of the noninfectious diseases of the respiratory organs, taking 
up in regular order- the nasal and accessory cavities, the larynx, bronchi, 
lungs, and pleura. 

34. — Medicine II. Junior year, spring term. Class work, three hours. 

Devoted to noninfectious diseases of the mouth, salivary glands, 
oesophagus, stomach and intestines, liver, pancreas, and peritoneum. 
This is followed by diseases of the urinary organs, of the circulatory 
organs, and diseases of metabolism. 

35. — Medicine III. Senior year, fall term. Class work, three hours. 
This course treats the noninfectious diseases of the nervous system, 
of the organs of locomotion, and of the skin. 

36. — Infectious Diseases. Senior year, winter term. Class work, 
four hours. 

In contradistinction to the preceding courses in medicine, the dis- 
tinctly infectious and contagious diseases of domesticated animals are 
discussed. The following order is usually adopted: acute general in- 
fectious diseases, acute exanthematous infectious diseases, acute infec- 
tious diseases with localization in certain organs, infectious diseases 
with special involvement of the nervous system, chronic infectious dis- 
eases, infectious diseases produced by protozoa. 

37. — Sanitary Medicine, Senior year, spring term. Class work, 
four hours. 

A continuation of the course in infectious diseases, in which par- 
ticular attention is given to propagation and spread of infectious dis- 
eases, predisposing and exciting causes of disease, general sanitation, etc. 

38. — Ophthalmology. It discusses the method of conducting exam- 
inations of the eye by means of the ophthalmoscope, illumination of the 
•eye, and the use of drugs as an aid to this process ; and acute and chronic 
diseases of the eye. 



156 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Reference books for the courses in medicine: Hutyra and Marek's 
Pathology of the Diseases of Domestic Animals, Vols. I and II; Fried- 
berger and Frohner's Veterinary Pathology, Vols. I and II; Law's Veteri- 
nary Medicine, Vols. I, II, III, IV, and V; Moussu and Dollar's Diseases 
of Cattle; Class* Diseases of the Dog; Cadiot's Clinical Veterinary 
Medicine. 

39. — Jurisprudence. Senior year, spring term. Class work, two 
hours. 

This course deals with the veterinarian's legal responsibilities, na- 
tional and state live-stock laws, quarantine regulations, etc. 

CLINICS 

40. — Clinics. Junior and senior years, twelve hours or more. 

A free clinic which affords an abundance of material is conducted. 
All species of domesticated animals are presented for treatment. These 
patients are assigned in regular order to the senior students for diagnosis 
and treatment; clinic sheets are provided, on which are recorded the 
history, symptoms, pulse, temperature, respiration, diagnosis, prognosis, 
treatment, and the unsoundnesses, defects or blemishes of the animal. 
The clinician in charge discusses all the abnormal conditions present in the 
patient, thus assisting the student to develop his powers of observation. 
The junior students assist the senior students and, in addition, are re- 
quired to master, by practical experience, the restraint of animals, 
bandaging, etc. The compounding of prescriptions, the preparation of 
antiseptics and other medicinal agents, is taken "in charge by the junior 
students. 

Patients left at the hospital for treatment are assigned to seniors, 
who are required to administer all medicines, change dressings of surgical 
wounds, etc. All work is performed under the direct supervision of the 
clinician in charge. Numerous country calls are received by the veteri- 
nary department, which are taken care of by one of the clinicians, and 
who is always accompanied by one or more senior students. This phase 
of the work is particularly valuable, as it gives the student practical 
experience under actual conditions. 

41. — Meat Inspection. Senior year, spring term. Class work, four 
hours. , Four credits. Required in the course in veterinary medicine. 

The course in meat inspection is designed to prepare experts for 
national, state and local sanitary work, which is being more strongly 
urged and demanded every day. The kinds and classes of stock, the traffic 
and transportation of animals, their inspection before death, their slaugh- 
ter, the normal conditions of healthy animals, the diseases discernible at 
the time of slaughter, the disposition of the condemned from economic, 
hygienic and sanitary standpoints, and different preparations and methods 
of preservation, adulterations, sanitary laws and regulations, and all 
other points bearing upon the question of healthful meat production, are 
considered. Visits are made to the local slaughtering establishments, and 
to the large packing plants in Topeka, Kansas City, or Wichita. Text, 
Edelman's Meat Hygiene, translated by Mohler and Eichorn. 

42. — Diseases of Farm Animals, and Obstetrics. Senior year, 
spring term. Class work, four hours. Four credits. Required in the 
courses in animal husbandry and dairy husbandry. Prerequisites: Gen- 
eral Anatomy I and Animal Physiology. 

This course is devoted to the study of the common diseases of farm 
animals and to obstetrics. The subjects discussed include wounds and 
their treatment, examining farm animals for disease, the diagnosis and 
treatment of disease, the causes and treatment of contagious diseases. 
Sanitary and other measures necessary for their eradication and pre- 
vention are also studied. The instruction in obstetrics embraces a com- 



Division of Agriculture 157 

pari son of the soft and bony structures of the pelvis in the different 
animals, the comparison being made with reference to normal and difficult 
parturition. The causes of sterility are discussed, and the necessary 
remedies suggested. Attention is given to the accidents and diseases, 
incidental to normal and difficult parturition. The diseases following 
parturition and the diseases affecting the offspring are also dealt with. 
Text, The Farmer's Veterinarian, by Burkett. 



Short Winter Courses in Agriculture and Dairying 



The Agricultural College offers primarily four-year courses in agri- 
culture, which give the student a fundamental training in the sciences 
relating to agriculture, and their application to the production of crops 
and stock and to farming in general. Such a course not only equips a 
man to become a successful farmer, but makes of him a better citizen, 
and a leader in the broader duties of life. 

Not all young men who choose to farm have the time or the means to 
spend the necessary four years in getting a college training. For such 
who are at least eighteen years of age, the Agricultural College offers a 
short, practical course in agriculture and dairying, given in two terms. 
The entire time of the student is occupied in learning how to do the 
various things which are necessary for the production of good crops and 
good stock, and for the business management of the farm. The subjects 
taught in such a course cover as much as can be given in the time, and 
are made intensely practical in presentation. The student is taught why 
and how to do the various farm operations. 

DESCRIPTION OF SHORT COURSES 

AGRICULTURE AND DAIRYING 

The student may select either agriculture or dairying, or a combination 
of the two, as may best suit his individual needs. All students are re- 
quired to take crop production, live-stock production, poultry, and wood- 
work the first year, and breeding and feeding of live stock, live-stock 
sanitation, agricultural botany, soil physics, and blacksmithing the second 
year. Other subjects offered are elective, enough being taken to make up 
a full course of fifteen hours of class work and twenty-eight hours of 
laboratory work a week. 

The work in crop production and live-stock production gives a knowl- 
edge of these subjects in a practical way. The student who has not taken 
scientific work is not able to study them from the standpoint of one 
trained in chemistry, physics, zoology, etc., but can get from his study 
in class and laboratory the art of doing these things properly. The same 
is true of dairying and horticulture. The farmer needs to know how to 
select stock and crops that will be best adapted to his environment, and 
the short courses train him to do this. He needs to know how to prepare 
his soil for the reception of the seed; or so to manage his feed as to make 
the greatest gains in feeding his live stock. These things are taught 
successfully to short-course students. 



158 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



Farm mechanics, as it relates to general farming or dairying and to 
practice in woodwork, is taught in such a way as to make the student 
capable of handling tools and machinery with proper skill. 

The students who return for the second winter's work are given more 
advanced work along the same lines that were studied the first year. 

The problems of breeding and feeding, diseases of live stock, soil and 
crop management, and the building up of pure-bred herds, are studied 
from the standpoints of the purchaser, the breeder, and the farmer. 



Farmers' Short Course 



The Arabic numeral immediately following the name of a subject indicates the number 
of credits, while the numerals in parentheses indicate the number of hours a week of 
recitation and of laboratory, respectively. 



FIRST YEAR 
Crop Production 

6 (4-4) 
Live Stock Market Classes 

3 (1-4) 
Live Stock Feeding 

3 (3-0) 
Horticulture and Forestry 

6 (4-4) 
Dairying I and Poultry 

6 (4-4) 
Farm Mechanics 

1 (0-2) 
Woodwork 

2 (0-4) 



SECOND YEAR 
Animal Breeding 

3 (3-0) 
Breeds 

3 (1-4) 
Farm Management 

2 (2-0) 

Live Stock Sanitation 

3 (3-0) or 
Gas Engines 

3 (1-4) 
Crop Improvement 

5 (3-4) 
Agricultural Botany 

2 (0-4) 

Soils 

2 (0-4) 



SECOND YEAR (Continued) 
Dairying II 

4 (4-0) or 
Horticulture 

3 (3-0) 
Farm Insects 

2 (2-0) 
Blacksmithing 

2 (0-4) 
Dairy Stock Judging 

2 (0-4) or 
Horticulture Laboratory 

2 (0-4) 



Creamery Course 

This course is offered for young men who wish to become butter or 
cheese makers, or handlers of market milk and ice cream. 

It is a technical course. Certificates are issued to students who have 
completed the course in a satisfactory manner and have a report of six 
months' successful work in a creamery. 

The subjects taught are as follows: 

Butter Making and Creamery Management 

8 (4-8) 
Cheese and Ice Cream Making 

4 (1-6) 
Dairying I 

6 (4-4) 
Dairy Mechanics and Refrigeration 

1 (0-2) 
Dairy Bacteriology 

4 (2-4) 
Judging Dairy Products 

2 (0-4) 

Dairy Stock Judging 
2 (0-4) 



Division of Agriculture 159 

SUBJECTS TAUGHT IN THE SHORT COURSES 
AGRONOMY 

1. — Crop Production. Class work, four hours; laboratory, four hours. 
Six credits. Required in the first year of the farmers' short course. 

In this course such questions as time, depth, and manner of plowing; 
seed-bed preparation ; time, rate, and method of seeding the various crops ; 
crop rotation and cultivation, and farm soils are taken up in turn and 
discussed in a practical way. 

^Laboratory. — Special attention is given to the grain crops grown in 
this State. Various types of different varieties of corn, wheat, oats, etc., 
are available for comparative study. The student has the opportunity to 
handle and examine specimens of the common crops of this State — the 
best possible method for becoming familiar with, the different plants. 

2. — Farm Mechanics. Laboratory, two hours. One credit. 

This is a new but very important line of work. There is probably a 
greater waste on farms from lack of knowledge of the kind of machinery 
to use, and of the way to care for it, than from any other cause. Me- 
chanics in some form is required in practically every operation per- 
formed on the farm. The purpose of this course is to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the important improvements in farm machinery and to give 
him a general idea of the proper care, adjustment, and use of all farm 
equipments, as well as a general idea of the factors concerned in the 
construction of farm buildings, etc. This work is given in the form of 
illustrated lectures and laboratory demonstrations. 

3. — Crop Improvement. Class work, three hours; laboratory, four 
hours. Five credits. 

The object of this course is to present practical, up-to-date, and ap- 
proved methods of improving farm crops. Such questions as seed selec- 
tion, crop adaptation, and crop rotation are presented and discussed in a 
practical manner. 

4. — Soils. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. Required in the 
second year of the short course. 

This course consists of a study of methods of handling soils; it teaches 
how to prepare a suitable seed-bed, how to conserve moisture, and how to 
maintain fertility. A part of the period is used for lectures and demon- 
strations. 

5. — Farm Management. Class work, two hours. Two credits. 

The object of this course is to assist the student in applying to the 
management of a farm the information gained from his studies in the 
various agricultural courses. The work in animal husbandry, dairying, 
horticulture, agronomy, and other lines is correlated and placed on a 
practicable, workable basis, with all nonessential features eliminated. 
The farm lay-out is studied with especial reference to the character of 
the soil, its adaptation to certain kinds of crops and types of farming; 
the location of the buildings", their adaptation to types of farming; the 
proper distribution of capital among land, buildings, live stock, farm 
machinery, etc. ; the division of the farm into fields of the proper size and 
shape for economical working; the planning and utilization of crops in 
rotation with one another; the relation of live stock to the maintenance 
of soil fertility; the proper adjustment of labor, teams, machinery, etc., 
to the farming area; and the growing of the right kind of crops in the 
proper proportion on farms of different types. 



160 Kansas State Agricultural College 

HORTICULTURE 

1. — Horticulture and Forestry. Class work, four hours; laboratory, 
four hours. Six credits. 

Lectures are given on the principles upon which successful work in 
gardening and fruit growing depends. Here is given a discussion of the 
preparation of the soil, the use of fertilizers, the propagation and manipu- 
lation of plants, and the gathering and marketing of garden and orchard 
products. The twelve lectures on forestry here included cover in detail 
the formation of windbreaks and farm wood-lots, discuss the trees suit- 
able for planting in the different parts of the State, and describe methods 
of planting and the care and cultivation required for securing successful 
growth. 

Laboratory. — Two periods are used in investigating plant propagation, 
plant training, and plant protection. The other two periods are spent in 
inspecting the forest nursery and timber plantations. 

2. — Horticulture. Class work, three hours. Three credits. 

The work of this course is somewhat similar to the horticultural work 
described in the preceding course. A short discussion of the landscape 
principles and materials concerned in the improvement of farm prop- 
erties is included. 

3. — Horticulture Laboratory. Four hours. Two credits. 

This includes. a study of orchard sites, and of grades of nursery stock 
and its care; tests of orchard tools, of fuels and heaters for frost pro- 
tection; a study of orchard sanitation, fruit picking, packing, judging, 
and storage. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

1. — Live-stock Market Classes. Class work, one hour; laboratory, 
four hours. Three credits. 

One lecture a week is given on the various market classes of live stock, 
taking up the study of the various market requirements for producing 
fat as well as for feeding cattle, the different types and classes of horses, 
sheep, and hogs. The aim of this work is to make the student familiar 
with the classifications found in the leading live-stock markets, and to 
enable him better to judge the various breeds of stock on the farm. 

Laboratory, — The principal work is the judging of cattle, sheep, and 
hogs. The student is first taught the use of the score-card, and, after 
becoming familiar with this, is required to use comparison and group 
judging, the aim being to make him familiar with the best types of 
horses, and able both to detect unsoundness and to select such classes of 
stock as will give the best returns. During the last two weeks of the 
course the instruction in stock judging takes up dairy cattle. This is an 
elementary course in dairy-stock judging, and consists of scoring and 
judging animals by the use of the score cards. 

2. — Live-stock Feeding. Class work, three hours. Three credits. 

This is a study of all the common feedstuffs grown on the average 
farm, of the use of mill feeds and by-products, of the combinations of 
feeds that will give the best results, and of the feeds that can be most 
economically used under various conditions. 

3. — Animal Breeding. Class work, three hours. Three credits. 

This subject is intended to give the student a knowledge of underlying 
principles and practices which are concerned in the improvement of our 
domestic animals. A careful study is made of the subject of variation in 
general. The subject of transmission of characters and the behavior of 
the various characters in transmission is taken up. The subject also 
includes correlation, type, and variability. Study is made of Mendel's 
law of hybrids. Prepotency of animals is studied as an influence in 
heredity. Practical problems involving the selection of animals and 



Division of Agriculture 161 

various systems of breeding, such as crossing, hybridizing, grading, line 
breeding, and inbreeding, are discussed. The student is shown how to 
maintain and to improve his own flocks and herds by the application of 
these various fundamental principles of breeding. 

4. — Breeds. Class work, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three 
credits. 

A study is made of the origin and history of the various breeds of 
domestic animals, of the characteristics of each breed, and of their 
adaptability to various conditions. 

Laboratory. — This work consists in the judging of pure-bred classes 
of stock. The characteristics of each breed, its weaknesses and its strong 
points, are emphasized, in order that the student may be better able to 
select his breeding herd. During the last two weeks of the course in 
breeds of live stock, the principal breeds of dairy cattle are studied, and 
types of each breed are judged and scored. For those students who elect 
dairying, or who desire to take more work in judging and studying dairy 
breeds, a special course is offered. In this course is given the history of 
breeds, their dairy characteristics, with the study of advanced registry 
systems and pedigree work with each breed. 

5.— Live-stock Sanitation. Class work, three hours. Three credits. 

This subject deals, with diseases that are communicable from animal 
to animal or from animal to man. The causes, symptoms, and methods 
that are employed to prevent and to combat the spread of diseases, and 
the drugs that are commonly used as disinfectants, for washes, dips, etc., 
are given full consideration. The use of serums, vaccines, etc., for the 
prevention of diseases is considered. Methods of disposal of sick and 
dead animals, as well as the means employed to clean and to disinfect the 
premises- so as to prevent a recurrence of diseases, are considered. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

1. — Dairying I. Class work, four hours; laboratory, four hours. Six 
credits. 

This is a general course in dairying, and consists of lectures on the 
secretion, composition, and properties of milk; the effect of the period of 
lactation; the Babcock test; the farm separator; farm butter making; 
and dairy sanitation. Lectures describe the handling of milk, feeding the 
dairy cow, and selecting and breeding the dairy herd. During the last 
two weeks the lectures deal with Poultry, which work is described else- 
where. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work in this course consists of the opera- 
tion of the Babcock test with milk, skimmed milk, cream, etc. ; of practice 
with farm separators; and of farm butter making. 

2. — Dairying II. Class work, four hours. Four credits. 

This course is planned for those students who elect dairying during 
the second year. Instruction is given in keeping records and accounts of 
dairy-farm business; in building up a dairy herd; concerning buildings 
on a dairy farm; concerning silos and silage; on the fertility account of 
the dairy; on the feeding, care, and management of the dairy herd; on 
cow-testing associations, the cooperative ownership of dairy sires, and the 
making of detailed plans for the management of the dairy farm. 

3. — Dairy Stock Judging. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. 

This course deals with judging dairy cattle from the standpoint of 
breed type. Practice is given in scoring animals with the breed score- 
cards, with comparative judging of the principal breeds. 

4. — Butter Making and Creamery Management. Class work, four 
hours; laboratory, eight hours. Eight credits. Lectures are given on the 

—6 



162 Kansas State Agricultural College 

sampling, weighing, and grading of cream and milk; on natural and com- 
mercial starters; on the pasteurization of milk and cream; on cream 
ripening, and the churning, washing, salting, packing, and marketing of 
butter; on conditions controlling the per cent of moisture in butter, etc. 
This course includes also a study of the location, construction, equipment, 
and general arrangement of the creamery; of the organization of co- 
operative creameries, etc.; of the question of supplies for the creamery 
markets; of the keeping of accounts; of the making up of pay rolls 
and systems of payment; of the building up of cream routes; of the rela- 
tion of creamery and buyers to the patrons; of the relation of patrons 
to the creamery. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work comprises practice in sampling, 
weighing, and grading milk and cream and in churning, packing, and 
marketing butter ; the study of different makes of churns ; the pasteuriza- 
tion of cream and practice with starters. 

5. — Cheese and Ice-cream Making. Class work, one hour; labora- 
tory, six hours. Four credits. 

This course deals with the making of cheese on the farm for home use 
and for sale. All the common types of cheese are made. The last half of 
the term is devoted to the study of ice-cream making, including proportion 
of cream, flavoring, fillers, freezing, packing, and storing ice cream. 

Laboratory. — Practice is given in the making of cheese, ice cream, and 
ices, for home use and on a commercial scale. The student judges cheese 
and prepares cream; flavors, freezes, and packs ice cream. 

6. — Dairy Mechanics and Refrigeration. Laboratory, two hours. 
One credit. Required in the creamery course. 

Practice work is given in pipe fitting, belt lacing, the adjustment of 
pulleys, soldering, refrigeration, installation and management of ma- 
chinery, etc. 

7. — Judging Dairy Products. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. 
The work comprises scoring and judging butter, cheese, milk, and ice 
cream. 

ADDITIONAL COURSES 

1. — Poultry. Class work, four hours a week for two weeks. Given 
in connection with Dairying I; for the combined work, six credits. 

The first part of the course is devoted to a study of farm poultry. The 
subjects — breeding, feeding, fattening, and marketing poultry; hatching 
and rearing chicks ; construction of poultry houses ; and methods of com- 
bating disease — are taken up in detail. The remainder of the time is 
given to a study of the different breeds from the fancy and from the 
utility standpoints. 

2. — Woodwork. Shop work, four hours. Two credits. 

A graded set of problems in joinery is given, with opportunity for 
practice in working to dimensions and in the proper use and care of 
bench tools. Tool required : a two-foot pocket folding rule. 

3. — Blacksmithing. Shop work, four hours. Two credits. 

This is a course in the forging of iron, designed to teach the opera- 
tions of drawing, upsetting, welding, twisting, splitting, and punching. 
A study is made of the construction, care, and management of the forge, 
with a study of the smelting of iron ore and the manufacturing of iron 
and steel. Tools required: a two-foot rule; one pair of five-inch outside 
calipers. 

4. — Gas Engines. Class work, one hour; laboratory, four hours. 
Three credits. 

This course is designed to teach the operation, care and repair of 
small stationary gas and oil engines. 



Division of Agriculture 163 

5.— Agricultural Botany. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. 

This is a study of the elements of botany from a practical standpoint.. 
Germination, growth, the nutrition of plants, the absorption and use of 
water, etc., are demonstrated by means of elementary experiments. The 
groups of the lower plants are rapidly surveyed, especial attention being 
paid to the fungi causing plant diseases. Chief attention is given to the 
botany of the higher plants, notably those most important in agriculture. 
The economic # relations of plants are emphasized throughout, and the 
practical bearings of plant physiology on agriculture are especially con- 
sidered. Some time is given to the matter of seed testing, and to the 
study of elementary methods in plant breeding. Text, Perceval's Agri- 
cultural Botany. 

6. — Farm Insects. Class work, two hours. Two credits. 

In this course the student is familiarized with the recognition marks, 
life history, and specific means of controlling the most injurious of the 
insects commonly found on the farm. He is required to prepare plans of 
actual farming operations on different types of farms whereby insect 
damage to the crops will be reduced to a minimum or completely elim- 
inated. 

7. — Dairy Bacteriology. Class work, two hours ; laboratory, four 
hours. Four credits. Required in the Creamery Short Course. 

This course is designed for students who have had no training in 
chemistry and biology and is a general study of the bacteriology of milk 
and milk products. Bacterial contaminations of milk from air, water, 
utensils, the cow, the milker, etc., are discussed. Normal and abnormal 
fermentations, their significance and control in milk, butter, cheese, and 
special dairy products are considered. 

Laboratory. — Methods for determining numbers and types of bacteria 
in dairy products are studied. The effect of sanitation, the use of heat 
and cold, etc., upon the development of bacteria are considered. 

COURSE IN TESTING DAIRY PRODUCTS 

This course is offered to those who are buying milk or cream and who 
wish to gain, in a short time, skill and accuracy in the application of the 
various tests necessary in such work. The law of the State requires that 
all persons buying milk or cream by test must pass a satisfactory exam- 
ination and secure a certificate from the State Dairy Commissioner. This 
course is designed to meet the needs of those who find they have not 
sufficient knowledge of the subject to pass such an examination. 

In addition to a study of the Babcock test, the student receives lectures 
on ordinary sanitation, and learns the methods necessary to keep his 
place of business in a sanitary condition. Exercises are given in grading 
milk and cream, and in methods of handling cream so as to keep it in con- 
dition until used or delivered at the railway station. This course is 
offered at different periods throughout the year, dates being announced a 
few days previous to the opening of each period. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Students over seventeen years of age are admitted to these courses 
without examination. Students under seventeen years of age are ad- 
mitted without examination, provided they present a certificate showing 
that they have completed the eighth grade in the common-school course, 
or its equivalent. 

All students entering short courses are required to be present at the 
beginning of the term, and will not be admitted later. 

Certificate. — A certificate is granted to students completing the work 
of the first and second years. 



164 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Cost. — The expenses for ten weeks need not exceed $50 to $75, ex- 
clusive of railroad fare. A fee of $3 is charged for the term, payable at 
enrollment. Reference books will cost from $5 to $10. For information 
write W. M. Jardine, Dean of the Division of Agriculture, Kansas 
State Agricultural College, Manhattan, Kan. 



Agriculture in the Summer School 

At the present time the greatest hindrance to the general introduction 
of agriculture into the high schools and grade schools of the State is a 
lack of properly prepared teachers. In order to give the teachers of the 
State an opportunity to fit themselves to introduce this subject success- 
fully into their schools, the College offers summer courses in agriculture, 
in which especial emphasis is laid upon the subject matter and methods 
adapted to secondary and primary schools. 

The work offered consists in part of some of the regular subjects of 
the College courses, including a thorough study of farm crops, especially 
corn and small grains, in which growing as well as matured crops are 
available for laboratory work. Courses are also available in the study of 
market types and classes of beef cattle, dairy stock, sheep and swine, 
with extensive practice in stock judging. Instruction is also given in 
dairying, poultry husbandry, general horticulture, landscape gardening, 
and orcharding. In addition to these subjects from the College courses, 
special classes are organized to meet the needs of teachers of agriculture 
in the rural schools, in the high schools, and in the lower grades. 

A special circular giving details of the Summer School may be obtained 
by application to the President of the College. The article in this cata- 
logue on the Summer School gives brief information. 



Fifty-first Annual Catalogue 165 



Division of Mechanic Arts 

Andrey Abraham Potter, Acting Dean. 



The Division of Mechanic Arts includes courses in agricul- 
tural engineering, architecture, civil and highway engineering, 
electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering, each lead- 
ing to the degree of bachelor of science in the profession 
selected. 

The work of the freshman year is the same in all courses ; the 
work of the sophomore year is the same for students of me- 
chanical engineering and electrical engineering, and, except 
that surveying is substituted for shop work, is the same for the 
course in civil engineering. For the course in architecture the 
plan of studies for the sophomore year is somewhat further 
modified. 

While the courses offered are believed to be sufficient to cover 
the needs of the average young man, it is possible to combine 
portions of the work of two or more of these Joiirses in such 
a way that one may be prepared to take up §T special line of 
work for which he desires to fit himself. For example, by sub- 
stituting certain subjects from the departments of chemistry 
and geology for some of those in the course in mechanical en- 
gineering, a young man can tit himself for work in connection 
with the manufacture of cement. By substituting some of the 
subjects in chemistry for others in mechanical engineering, a 
special preparation can be secured for chemical engineering. 
By combining some of the subjects of the courses in civil and 
mechanical engineering and by taking additional work in 
chemistry and geology, a young man may fit himself for special 
work in connection with the development of the coal fields 
throughout the country. By combining work in the courses 
in architecture and civil engineering, specialization in archi- 
tectural engineering may be secured. In special cases permis- 
sion will be granted to combine the work on the lines here in- 
dicated. 

However, it is believed that the courses as tabulated give the 
best preparation for students expecting to follow general work 
in the profession selected, and for those who are not absolutely 
certain what branch of their profession they will follow. The 
substitutions and combinations indicated, and others similar to 
them, will be permitted only when there is good evidence that 
the student desiring such work is practically certain to follow 
the branch selected. 



166 Kansas State Agricultural College 

In the case of any of these modifications, the degree granted 
will be that of the course in which the major portion of the 
work is taken. In no case will the substitution of an additional 
amount of technical work for any of the general cultural work 
in the course be allowed. 

COURSE IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

The course in agricultural engineering with its three options 
is designed to fit men as irrigation engineers,* as designers of 
farm machinery and motors, or as flour-mill engineers and 
designers. 

The work of the first year is the same as in the other engi- 
neering courses. During the second, third, and fourth years, 
students choosing the farm machinery option take considerable 
shop work, mechanics, kinematics, farm motors, farm ma- 
chinery, hydraulics, and designing, besides such fundamental 
agricultural subjects as crops, soils, and farm management. 
In the irrigation and drainage engineering option the work of 
the second, third, and fourth years includes fundamental civil 
engineering subjects, such as surveying, civil engineering 
drawing, masonry and concrete design, structures. Con- 
siderable time-4s also devoted to problems in irrigation and 
drainage engineering, supplemented by courses in shop work, 
hydraulics, mechanics, crops, and soils. In the flour milling 
option considerable time is devoted to chemistry, flour-mill 
design, crops, grain inspection, wheat and flour testing, and 
milling practice. The student, in this option, is given the 
fundamental subjects in the mechanical-engineering course, 
including shop work, mechanical drawing, applied mechanics, 
hydraulics, and steam and gas engineering. 

No student taking the course in agricultural engineering 
will be allowed to graduate who has not had at least six months* 
practical experience in the work of the option selected. 

COURSE IN ARCHITECTURE 

The course in architecture was organized to train men in the 
general field of architecture and also to relate the principles 
of architecture to farm buildings and grounds. The rapid in- 
crease in wealth in the State creates a demand for designers 
and builders of every type. 

The freshman year of this course is identical with that of 
the other courses of the division of mechanic arts. The other 
three years are devoted to the study of pure and applied 
mathematics, mechanics, physics, history of architecture, mu- 
nicipal improvements, modern steel and cement construction, 
rural landscape architecture. The course aims to develop the 
creative powers of the student in the fields of original composi- 
tion. From ten to sixteen hours a week, for the last three 



Division of Mechanic Arts 167 

years of the course, are given to work of this kind over the 
drawing table. 

The College is well equipped for the maintenance of a course 
in architecture. It owns a collection of several hundred plaster 
casts, tile and terra cotta samples, marble specimens, etc. It 
has a fine collection of models of the classic orders ; a collec- 
tion of blue-prints of residences, schoolhouses and churches, 
and of nearly all the Kansas state buildings ; a large number 
of modern books on architecture and engineering ; a complete 
set of the international edition of the American Architect; 
a complete set of the Inland Architect, and sets of several 
European architectural magazines ; a well-equipped blue-print 
room, etc. The substantial stone buildings of the institution, 
their complete system of water-supply, drainage, heating and 
lighting, and one of the largest and handsomest campuses in 
America, furnish excellent illustrative material. 

Students taking the course in architecture are expected to 
devote their summer vacations to practical work in actual 
building operations. 

COURSE IN CIVIL AND HIGHWAY ENGINEERING 

The aim of the course in civil engineering, with options in 
highway engineering, as outlined in the catalogue, is to give 
to the young men taking the course the best possible prepara- 
tion for entering upon the active practice of the profession 
under present conditions. It will be noted that the first and 
second years of the course are devoted almost entirely to gen- 
eral culture studies and the sciences, including mathematics. 
This follows the arrangement generally found in the engi- 
neering courses of American colleges, and it finds its justifica- 
tion in the well-nigh universally accepted idea that any engi- 
neering education worthy of consideration must be grounded 
upon ample preliminary education in the allied sciences. In 
recognition of the mechanical trend of the age, liberal pro- 
vision is made in the course for class and laboratory work in 
mechanical and electrical engineering. 

In view of the growing importance of municipal problems, 
such as paving, sewerage and water-supply, the course in civil 
engineering includes a required course in municipal engineer- 
ing, supplemented by courses in sanitary biology and chem- 
istry. 

The work in highway engineering affords time for an un- 
usually thorough course in this subject, which is of such great 
importance at the present time. It includes courses in road 
machinery, and road building. 

A liberal course in drainage and irrigation engineering is 
introduced for those who may wish to take up this line of 
work, which is coming rapidly into prominence. 



168 Kansas State Agricultural College 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

The essential elements underlying a sound engineering train- 
ing are based upon a thorough study of mathematics and the 
physical sciences. The professional work of this course begins 
in the third year and continues throughout the rest of the 
course. General culture subjects are offered during the first 
three years of the course. 

Emphasis is placed upon training to deal with forces and 
matter according to scientific principles, rather than upon the 
accumulation of facts. The department laboratories are well 
equipped with the various measuring instruments, standard- 
izing apparatus, and the different types of dynamo machinery. 
The different subjects are presented in the classroom, and the 
classroom work is supplemented by laboratory practice. The 
course provides a liberal training in wood- and iron-working, 
mechanical drawing, and machine-shop pracice. The labora- 
tory experiments selected for the student are designed to give 
a clear conception of the theoretical work of the classroom. 

Students are given extensive practice in connecting up the 
different types of machines for testing purposes and for stand- 
ard commercial work. This practice work and testing ex- 
tends throughout the junior and senior years, and is intended 
to give the student familiarity with the underlying principles 
of the different machines, and a knowledge of the care neces- 
sary to operate them successfully. Opportunity is also given 
to undertake the investigation of commercial problems as they 
are sent to the College from the different central stations of 
the State. 

In connection with the regular work of the classroom and 
the laboratory, extensive references are given to leading books 
and to current literature on technical engineering. In con- 
nection with the laboratory work a certain amount of library 
work is required. In the year 1908 a College branch of the 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers was organized. 
The branch meets the first Tuesday of each month. At these 
meetings the instructors meet with the students for the dis- 
cussion of technical subjects in engineering. Consulting engi- 
neers and central-station managers are invited to present 
papers at these meetings. 

COURSE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

The course in mechanical engineering prepares for the suc- 
cessful management and superintendence of factories and 
power plants ; for the design of power and machinery installa- 
tions ; for the design and construction of machine tools, steam 
and gas engines, compressors, hydraulic machinery, etc. ; and 
for the design and erection of mill and engineering buildings. 

The course of study has been laid out with the aim of 
securing a judicious mixture of theory and practice, such as 



Division of Mechanic Arts 169 

will not only give the student the technical skill required for 
engineering operations, but will also give him a broad grasp 
of the fundamental principles of his profession. 

It is not the intention in this course to give the young man 
training similar to that received in serving an apprenticeship, 
but rather to instruct him in the technical and theoretical 
principles upon which the art of mechanical engineering is 
based, without a thorough knowledge of which a man can not 
rise to a position of responsibility in this profession. The 
advantages of combining a practical application of principles 
with theoretical instruction, while these principles are being 
impressed upon the student by classroom work, are well 
known. 

The course in shop work, being purely educational in its 
character, is designed to teach the various methods of doing 
shop work, the operations that may be performed upon the 
different machines, and upon what machines certain opera- 
tions can be performed most economically, as well as to 
acquaint the student with what may be expected not only from 
the machines, but from the men operating them. In order to 
secure this knowledge it is necessary that the student should 
perform a large variety of operations. To accomplish this 
result, an appreciable proportion of the course consists of 
graded exercises. Wherever possible the student also is 
assigned to work on apparatus and machinery that is being 
built for use in the engineering or other departments of the 
College, a large amount of which is constantly under way in 
the shops. 

Each student in the course in mechanical engineering is re- 
quired to present before graduation a satisfactory thesis that 
shows the results of original research along engineering lines. 

Course in Agricultural Engineering 

Option 1 — Farm. Machinery 

Option 2 — Irrigation and Drainage Engineering 

Option 3 — Flour Milling 

The Arabic numeral immediately following the name of a subject indicates the number 
• of credits, while the numerals in parentheses indicate the number of hours a week of 
recitation and of laboratory, respectively. 





FRESHMAN 




FALL 


WINTEK 


SPRING 


English I 
4 (4-0) 


English II 

4 (4-0) 
Library Methods E 

1 (0-2) 


English Literature 
4 (4-0) 


Chemistry I 
4 (3-2) 


Chemistry II 
4 (2-4) 


Chemistry III 
4 (3-2) 


Plane Trigonometry 
4 (4-0) 


College Algebra 
4 (4-0) 


Analytical Geometry 
4 (4-0) 


Descriptive Geometry I 
3 (2-2) 


Descriptive Geometry II 
3 (2-2) 


Descriptive Geometry III 
3 (2-2) 


Blacksmithing I 
3 (1-4) 


Blacksmithing II 
2 (0-4) 


Foundry 

3 (1-4) 


Military Drill 


Military Drill 


Military Drill 



170 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



Agricultural Engineering — continued 

SOPHOMORE 



FALL 


WINTER 


SPRING 


Engineering Physics I 
5 (4-2) 


Engineering Physics II 
5 (4-2) 


Engineering Physics III 
6 (4-4) 


Calculus' I 
4 (4-0) 


Calculus II 
4 (4-0) 


Calculus III 
4 (4-0) 


Mechanical Drawing I 
2 (1-2) 


Mechanical Drawing II 

3 (1-4) 
Extempore Speech 

2 (2-0) 


Machine Shop 
2 (0-4) 


Military Drill 


Military Drill 


Military Drill 


Option I 


Options I and II 


Option I 


Pattern Making 
3 (1-4) 


Industrial History 
4 (4-0) 


Surveying 
3 (1-4) 


Kinematics I 
4 (4-0) 




Mechanical Drawing III 
3 (0-6) 


Option II 




Option II 


Surveying I 
7 (4-6) 




General Bacteriology 

4 (2-4) 
Agricultural Chemistry 

2 (2-0) 


Option III 


Option III 


Option III 


Pattern Making 
3 (1-4) 


Kinematics I 
4 (4-0) 


Quantitative Analysis I 
3 (0-6) 


Qualitative Analysis 
4 (2-4) 


JUNIOR 


Mechanical Drawing III 
3 (0-6) 


Applied Mechanics I 
5 (4-2) 


Applied Mechanics II 
5 (4-2) 


Hydraulics 
4 (3-2) 


Cereal Crop Production 
5 (3-4) 




Economics 
4 (4-0) 


Machine Shop II 
2 (0-4) 






Options I and V 


Options I and II 


Option I 


General Geology 
4 (4-0) 


Farm Motors I 
4 (2-4) 


Farm Motors IT 
3 (2-2) 


Elective 
2(-) 


Soils I 

5 (3-4) 


Farm Machinery 
4 (2-4) 




Option I 


Elective 




Machine Shop III-A 
4 (1-6) . 


3 ( - ) 




Option II 


Option II 




Graphic Statics 
2 (0-4) 


Farm Motors II 
3 (2-2) 




O. E. Drawing I 

2 (0-4) 


Farm Machinery 
4 (2-4) 

Foundations 
3 (3-0) 


Option III 


Option III 


Option III 


Quantitative Analysis II 
2 (0-4) 


Quantitative Analysis III 
2 (0-4) 


Electrical Engineering C 
4 (3-2) 


Commercial Grain and Grain 

Cnspection 4 (3-2) 


Advanced Industrial History 

4 (4-0) 


Machine Shop IV 
4 (1-6) 




Grain Products 
4 (3-2) 


Experimental Milling 
2 (0-4) 




Machine Shop III 
3 (1-4) 





Division of Mechanic Arts 



171 



Agricultural Engineering — continued 



FALL 
Options I and II 
Hydraulic Machinery 
3 (2-2) 



Option I 
Farm Machinery II 

3 (0-6) 
Traction Engines 

3 (1-4) 
Machine Design I 

3 (1-4) 
Electives 

6 (-) 
Thesis 

Option II 
Drainage and Irrigation I 

3 (3-0) 
Surveying II 

7 (4-6) 
Electives 

4 (4-0) 
Thesis 

Option III 
Flour Mill Design I 

5 (2-6) 

Steam and Gas Engr. E-I 

5 (4-2) 
Advanced Exper. Milling 

4 (0-8) 
General Entomology 

4 (3-2) 



Thesis 



SENIOR 

WINTER 
Options I and II 
Farm Management 
4 (3-2) 



Option I 
Farm Buildings and Equip. 

5 (2-6) 
Factory Engineering 

2 (2-0) 
Machine Design II-A 

2 (1-2) 
Electives 

5 (-) 
Thesis 

Option II 
Drainage and Irrigation II 

3 (1-4) 
Structures 

6 (3-6) 
Masonry and Concrete 

5 (3-4) 
Thesis 

Option III 
Flour Mill Design II 

3 (0-6) 

Steam and Gas Engr. E-II 

5 (4-2) 
Wheat and Flour Testing 

4 (1-6) 
Factory Engineering 

2 (2-0) 
Basiness Organization 

2 (2-0) 
Business Law 

2 (2-0) 
Thesis 



SPRING 
Options I and II 
Electrical Engineering O 
4 (3-2) 

Business Organization 

2 (2-0) 
Highway Engineering 

3 (3-0) 
Concrete Construction 

3 (1-4) 
Business Law 

2 (2-0) 

Option I 
Factory Design 

3 (0-6) 
Thesis 



Option II 
Drainage and Irrigation III 

3 (0-6) 
Thesis 



Option III 
Heating and Ventilation 

3 (2-2) 

Milling Entomology 

2 (2-0) 
Experimental Baking Tests 

4 (0-8) 
Milling Practice 

4 (0-8) 
Factory Design 

3 (0-6) 
Thesis 



Course in Architecture 

The Arabic numeral immediately following the name of a subject indicates the number 
of credits, while the numerals m parentheses indicate the number of hours a week of 
recitation and of laboratory, respectively. 





FRESHMAN 




FALL 


WINTER 


SPRING 


English I 


English II 


English Literature 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 
Library Methods E 
1 (0-2) 


4 (4-0) 


Chemistry I 


Chemistry II 


Chemistry III 


4 (3-2) 


4 (2-4) 


4 (3-2) 


Plane Trigonometry 


College Algebra 


Analytical Geometry 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


Descriptive Geometry I 
3 (2-2) 


Descriptive Geometry II 
3 (2-2) 


Descriptive Geometry III 
3 (2-2) 


Blacksmithing I 


Blacksmithing II 


Foundry 


3 (1-4) 


2 (0-4) 


3 (1-4) 


Military Drill 


Military Drill 


Military Drill 



172 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



Architecture — continued 



FALL 
Engineering Physics I 

5 (4-2) 
Advanced Industrial History 

4 (4-0) 

[Residences 

4 (4-0) 
Shades and Shadows 

2 (0-4) 
Architectural Drawing I 

3 (0-6) 
Military Drill 



SOPHOMORE 

WINTER 
Engineering Physics II 

5 (4-2) 
General Bacteriology 

4 (2-4) 
Historic Ornament 

4 (4-0) 
Linear Perspective 

2 (0-4) 
Architectural Drawing II 

3 (0-6) 
Military Drill 



SPRING 
Engineering Physics III 

6 (4-4) 
Extempore Speech 

2 (2-0) 
Kinematics I 

4 (4-0) 
Surveying 

3 (1-4) 
Architectural Drawing III 

3 (0-6) 
Military Drill 



History of Architecture I 

4 (4-0) 
Economics 

4 (4-0) 
Acoustics 

1 (1-0) 
Advanced Woodwork 

3 (1-4) 
Clay Modeling 

3 (0-6) 
Architectural Composition 

3 (0-6) 



JUNIOR 

History of Architecture IT 

4 (4-0) 
Business Law 

2 (2-0) 
Business Organization 

2 (2-0) 
Heating 

4 (4-0) 
Color and Design A 

3 (0-6) 
Architectural Composition II 

3 (0-6) 



History of Architecture III 

4 (4-0) 
Engineering Geology 

6 (4-4) 
Graphic Statics 

2 (0-4) 

Mural Decoration 

3 (0-6) 



Architect'l Composition 
3 (0-6) 



III 



Public Buildings 

4 (4-0) 
Plumbing 

2 (2-0) 
Beams and Arches 

3 (1-4) 
Municipal Improvements 

4 (4-0) 
Ink Rendering 

2 (0-4) 

Architect'l Composition IV 

3 (0-6) 



SENIOR 

Specifications 

4 (4-0) 
Trusses 

4 (2-4) 
Architectural Seminar 

4 (4-0) 
Color Rendering 

2 (0-4) 



Architectural Composition V 



Landscape Architecture 

4 (4-0) 
Power and Lighting 

4 (3-2) 
Landscape Design 

4 (0-8) 



Architectural Thesis 
6 (0-12) 



Course in Civil and Highway Engineering 

The Arabic numeral immediately following the name of a subject indicates the number 
of credits, while the numerals in parentheses indicate the number of hours a week of 
recitation and of laboratory, respectively. 



FALL 

English I 

4 (4-0) 
Chemistry I 

4 (3-2) 
Plane Trigonometry 

4 (4-0) 
Descriptive Geometry I 

3 (2-2) 



Blacksmithing I 

3 (1-4) 
Military Drill 



FRESHMAN 

WINTER 

English II 

4 (4-0) 
Chemistry II 

4 (2-4) 
College Algebra 

4 (4-0) 
Descriptive Geometry II 

3 (2-2) 
Library Methods E 

1 (0-2) 
Blacksmithing II 

2 (0-4) 
Military Drill 



SPRING 

English Literature 

4 (4-0) 
Chemistry III 

4 (3-2) 
Analytical Geometry 

4 (4-0) 
Descriptive Geometry III 

3 (2-2) 



Foundry 

3 (1-4) 
Military Drill 



Division of Mechanic Arts 



173 



Civil and Highway Engineering — continued 

SOPHOMORE 



FALL 


WINTER 


SPRING 


Calculus I 


Calculus II 


Calculus III 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


Engineering Physics I 


Engineering Physics II 


Engineering Physics III 


5 (4-2) 


5 (4-2) 


6 (4-4) 


Mechanical Drawing I 


General Bacteriology 


Mechanical Drawing II 


2 (1-2) 


4 (2-4) 


3 (1-4) 


Surveying I 


Military Drill 


Extempore Speech 


7 (4-6) 
Military Drill 


Option I 

Chemistry C 


2 (2-0) 
Foundations 




5 (1-8) 


3 (3-0) 




Option II 


Military Drill 




Soils ' 






5 (1-8) 






JUNIOR 




Economics 


Business Law 


Engineering Geology 


4 (4-0) 


2 (2-0) 


6 (4-4) 


Surveying II 


Business Organization 


Hydraulics 


7 (4-6) 


2 (2-0) 


4 (3-2) 


Applied Mechanics I 


Applied Mechanics II CE 


Applied Mechanics III 


5 (4-2) 


6 (4-4) 


4 (3-2) 


Option I 
Spherical Trigonometry 
2 (2-0) 


Advanced Industrial History 
4 (4-0) 

Graphic Statics 
2 (0-4) 


C. E. Drawing II 
4 (0-8) 


Option II 


. 0. E. Drawing I 


Road Machinery Laboratory 


2 (0-4) 




2 (2-0) 


SENIOR 




Bridge Stresses 


Bridge Design 


Electrical Engineering CE 


4 (4-0) 


6 (3-6) 


4 (3-2) 

Option I 


Steam and Gas Engr. C 


Railways I 


Railways II 


4 (3-2) 


3 (3-0) 


4 (0-8) 


Drainage and Irrigation I 


Masonry and Concrete 


Geodesy 


3 (3-0) 


5 (3-4) 


4 (2-4) 


Option I 


Option I 


Highway Engineering 
3 (3-0) 


Water Supply and Sewerage 


Astronomy 


4 (4-0) 


3 (2-2) 




Hydraulic Machinery 






3 (2-2) 






Thesis 


Thesis 


Thesis 


Option II 


Option II 


Option II 


Highway Engineering I 


Highway Engineering II 


Concrete Construction 


7 (4-6) 


4,(4-0) 


2 (0-4) 
Specification and Inspection 

2 (2-0) 
Highway Engineering III 

7 (3-8) 


Thesis 


Thesis 


Thesis 



174 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



Course in Electrical Engineering 

The Arabic numeral immediately following the name of a subject indicates the number 
of credits, while the numerals in parentheses indicate the number of hours a week of 
recitation and of laboratory, respectively. 



FALL 

English I 

4 (4-0) 
Chemistry I 

4 (3-2) 
Plane Trigonometry 

4 (4-0) 
Descriptive Geometry I 

3 (2-2) 



Blacksmithing I 
3 (1-4) 

Military Drill 



FRESHMAN 

WINTER 

English II 

4 (4-0) 
Chemistry II 

4 (2-4) 
College Algebra 

4 (4-0) 
Descriptive Geometry II 

3 (2-2) 
Library Methods E 

1 (0-2) 
Blacksmithing II 

2 (0-4) 
Military Drill 



SPUING 

English Literature 

4 (4-0) 
Chemistry III 

4 (3-2) 
Analytical Geometry 

4 (4-0) 
Descriptive Geometry III 

3 (2-2) 



Foundry 

3 (1-4) 
Military Drill 



Advanced Industrial History 

4 (4-0) 
Engineering Physics I 

5 (4-2) 
Calculus I 

4 (4-0) 
Mechanical Drawing I 

2 (1-2) 
Pattern Making 

3 (1-4) 
Military Drill 



Economics 

4 (4-0) 
Seminar E I 

1 (i-o) 
Applied Mechanics I 

5 (4-2) 
Theory of Electricity 

5 (4-2) 

Machine Shop III 

3 (1-4) 



D. 0. Machine Design 

4 (2-4) 

Steam and Gas Engr. E I 

5 (4-2) 

A- C. Machines I 

6 (4-4) 



Hydraulic Machinery 
3 (2-2) 

Thesis 



SOPHOMORE 

Kinematics 

4 (4-0) 
Engineering Physics II 

5 (4-2) 
Calculus II 

4 (4-0) 
Mechanical Drawing II 
3 (1-4) 

Machine Shop I 
2 (0-4) 

Military Drill 



JUNIOR 

Extempore Speech 
2 (2-0) 



Applied Mechanics II CE 
6 (4-4) 

Theory of Electricity II 

4 (3-2) 

D. C. Machines I 
6 (4-4) 

SENIOR 

Seminar E II 

2 (2-0) 
Steam and Gas Engr. E II 

5 (4-2) 

A. C. Machines II 

6 (4-4) 



Telephone Engineering 

4 (3-2) 
Thesis 



Surveying 

3 (1-4) 
Engineering Physics III 

6 (4-4) 
Calculus III 

4 (4-0) 
Mechanical Drawing III 

3 (0-6) 

Machine Shop II 

2 (0-4) 
Military Drill 



Business Law 

2 (2-0) 
Business Organization 

2 (2-0) 
Hydraulics 

4 (3-2) 
Electrical Instruments and 

Calibration 4 (2-4) 
D. O. Machines II 

6 (4-4) 



Generation and Distribution 

of Elec. Energy 4 (4-0) 
Refrigeration 

3 (2-2) 
A. C. Machine Design 

2 (1-2) 
Power-plant Design and 

Specifications 4 (1-6) 
Illuminating Engineering 

3 (2-2) 
Thesis 



Division of Mechanic Arts 



175 



Course in Mechanical Engineering 

The Arabic numeral immediately following the name of a subject indicates the number 
of credits, while the numerals in parentheses indicate the number of hours a week of 
recitation and of laboratory, respectively. 



FALL 


WINTER 


SPRING 


English I 
4 (4-0) 


English II 

4 (4-0) 
Library Methods E 

1 (0-2) 


English Literature 
4 (4-0) 


Chemistry I 
4 (3-2) 


Chemistry II 
4 (2-4) 


Chemistry III 
4 (3-2) 


Plane Trigonometry 
4 (4-0) 


College Algebra 
4 (4-0) 


Analytical Geometry 
4 (4-0) 


Descriptive Geometry I 
3 (2-2) 


Descriptive Geometry II 
3 (2-2) 


Descriptive Geometry III 
3 (2-2) 


Blacksmithing I 
3 (1-4) 


Blacksmithing II 
2 (0-4) 


Foundry 

3 (1-4) 


Military Drill 


Military Drill 

SOPHOMORE 


Military Drill 


Advanced Industrial History 
4 (4-0) 


Kinematics 
4 (4-0) 


Surveying 
3 (1-4) 


Engineering Physics I 
5 (4-2) 


Engineering Physics II 
5 (4-2) 


Engineering Physics III 
6 (4-4) 


Calculus I 
4 (4-0) 


Calculus II 
4 (4-0) 


Calculus III 
4 (4-0) 


Mechanical Drawing I 
2 (1-2) 


Mechanical Drawing II 
3 (1-4) 


Mechanical Drawing III 
3 (0-6) 


Pattern Making 
3 (1-4) 


Extempore Speech 
2 (2-0) 


Machine Shop I 
2 (0-4) 


Military Drill 


Military Drill 

JUNIOR 


Military Drill 


Economics 
4 (4-0) 


Business Law 
2 (2-0) 


Hydraulics 
4 (3-2) 




Business Organization 
2 (2-0) 


Graphic Statics 
2 (0-4) 


Applied Mechanics I 
5 (4-2) 


Applied Mechanics II M 
5 (4-2) 


Applied Mechanics III 
4 (3-2) 


Steam and Gas Engineer'g I 
4 (4-0) 


Steam and Gas Engr. II 
4 (3-2) 


Steam and Gas Engr. Ill 
4 (3-2) 


Kinematics II 
3 (2-2) 


Mechanical Drawing IV 
2 (0-4) 




Machine Shop II 
2 (0-4) 


Machine Shop III 
3 (1-4) 

SENIOR 


Machine Shop IV 
4 (1-6) 


Applied Mechanics IV 
3 (2-2) 


Factory Engineering 
2 (2-0) 


Factory Design 
3 (0-6) 




Power Plant Engineering 
2 (2-0) 


Power Plant Design 
2 (0-4) 


Steam and Gas Engr. IV 
4 (3-2) 


Steam and Gas Engr. V 
4 (3-2) 


Refrigeration 
3 (2-2) 


Electrical Engineering M I 
5 (4-2) 


Electrical Engineering M 
5 (4-2) 


II Heating and Ventilation 
3 (2-2) 


Machine Design I 
3 (1-4) 


Machine Design II 
2 (0-4) 


Machine Design III 
3 (0-6) 


Hydraulic Machinery 
3 (2-2) 


Machine Shop V 
2 (0-4) 


Machine Shop VI 
2 (0-4) 


Thesis 


Thesis 


Thesis 



176 Kansas State Agricultural College 



Applied Mechanics and Machine Design 

Professor Seatoh - 
Instructor Bowerman 
Instructor Pkeeman 

Assistant 

Assistant 

The courses in applied mechanics are designed primarily to teach the 
graphical and analytical methods of determination, both of the forces 
acting on the parts of structures and machines, and of the effect of these 
forces on the parts, together with the fundamental principles of the 
design of the parts to meet specified conditions. The course is intended 
to be of a highly practical character. For the purpose of better fixing 
in the mind of the student the principles taught, the solution of a large 
number of problems involving these principles is required in both the 
applied mechanics and hydraulics. The principles are further illustrated 
by means of the laboratory and drafting-room work, which parallels the 
classroom instruction. The textbooks in several of the courses are supple- 
mented by notes and assigned reference work. 

APPLIED MECHANICS LABORATORY 

For testing the strength of materials this laboratory is provided with 
a 100,000-pound Riehle Universal Testing Machine, a 200,000-pound Olsen 
Universal Testing Machine adapted for receiving columns up to 15 feet 
in length, a 250,000-inch-pound Torsion Testing Machine, a 10,000-pound 
beam testing machine and the auxiliary apparatus usually found in such 
laboratories. 

This laboratory also contains transmission and absorption dynamom- 
eters, an oil and bearing testing machine, screws, jacks, hoists, scales, 
gauges and other small instruments for taking weights and measurements. 
There is a full equipment of apparatus for making standard cement and 
concrete tests, a concrete building block machine and molds for various 
concrete products, such as drainage tile and fence posts. 

The road materials laboratory contains an Olsen standard rattler for 
testing paving brick, a ball mill briquette former, impact machines, 
abrasion machine, hardness testing machine, diamond saw, core drill, and 
the usual auxiliary apparatus, as scales, ovens, etc. 

HYDRAULICS LABORATORY 

The hydraulics laboratory contains two hydraulic pits of 25,000 gallons 
capacity each, an air-pressure tank, two hydraulic rams, two 4-inch 
volute centrifugal pumps, one 18-inch deefr-well four-stage centrifugal 
pump, one positive rotary pump, two deep-well reciprocating pumps, a 
water motor, a Pelton-Doble water wheel, a small Price current meter, 
a Haskell current meter, and many pieces of small apparatus, such as 
weirs, scales, tanks, hook gauges, pressure gauges, and manometers. 

All laboratory tests of a commercial character are conducted in ac- 
cordance with the standard methods prescribed by the national societies. 
Complete reports are required of the students on all laboratory exercises. 



Division of Mechanic Arts 111 

COURSES IN APPLIED MECHANICS AND MACHINE 

DESIGN 

1. — Applied Mechanics I. Junior year, fall term. Class work, four 
hours ; laboratory, two hours. Five credits. Prerequisites : Calculus III ; 
Engineering Physics III. 

This course includes composition, resolution and conditions of equi- 
librium of concurrent and nonconcurrent forces; center of gravity; laws of 
rectilinear and curvilinear motion of material points ; moments of inertia ; 
relations between forces acting on rigid bodies and the resulting motions; 
work energy and power ; graphical solutions of problems in statics. Text, 
Hancock's Applied Mechanics for Engineers, 

2. — Applied Mechanics II. Junior year, winter term. Class work, 
four hours; laboratory, two or four hours. Five or six credits. Pre- 
requisite: Applied Mechanics I. 

This course treats of the following: behavior of materials subjected 
to tension, compression, and shear; riveted joints; torsion; shafts, and 
the transmission of power; strength and stiffness of beams and can- 
tilevers; bending moments and shear forces in beams; design of beams 
of wood, cast iron, steel, and reinforced concrete; design of built-up 
beams and box girders; resilience of beams; stresses in columns and 
hooks; and the design of columns of wood, cast iron, steel, and concrete. 
Text, Boyd's Strength of Materials. Cambria Steel is used for reference. 

3. — Graphic Statics. Junior year, winter and spring terms. Draft- 
ing-room practice, supplemented by lectures, four hours. Two credits. 
Prerequisite: Applied Mechanics II; or the two courses may be taken 
together. 

The graphical solution of stresses existing in a number of typical 
trusses, with a detail design of one of the simpler forms of roof trusses 
is the subject matter of the course. 

4. — Applied Mechanics III. Junior year, spring term. Class work, 
three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Prerequisite: Applied 
Mechanics II. 

This course treats of stresses in continuous and built-up beams; 
masonry arches, and arch ribs; stability of dams and retaining walls; 
properties of materials for reinforced concrete; mechanical bond; rec- 
tangular and T beams; double reinforced beams; web reinforcing; 
columns reinforced with bars and hoops; reinforced concrete in building 
construction; design of slabs, beams, girders, and columns. Texts, Boyd's 
Strength of Materials, and Turneaure and Maurer's Principles of Rein- 
forced Concrete Construction. 

5. — Hydraulics. Junior year, spring term. Class work, three hours; 
laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Prerequisite : Applied Mechanics I. 

This course includes a study of fluid pressure, stresses in containing 
vessels and pipes, center of pressure, immersion and flotation; of 
Bernoulli's theorem, with applications; of flow through orifices, weirs, 
short and long pipes; of loss of head due to various causes; of flow of 
water in open channels, and its measurement; of Kutter's formula; of 
impulse and reaction of a jet; of power of jets; of plates moving in 
fluids. Text, Russel's Textbook on Hydraulics. 

6. — Applied Mechanics IV. Senior year, fall term. Class work, 
three hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Applied Mechanics III. 

Dynamics of machinery, friction, lubrication and lubricants, are studied 
in this course. Text, Lanza's Dynamics of Machines. 

7. — Hydraulic Machinery. Senior year, fall term. Class work, two 

hours; laboratory, two hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Hydraulics. 

This course treats of elements of water power; design, construction 



178 Kansas State Agricultural College 

and operation of gravity motors, impulse wheels and turbines; regulation 
of water motors; testing of impulse wheels and turbines; centrifugal, 
turbine and reciprocating pumps; pressure engines, accumulators, and 
hydraulic rams. Text, Church's Hydraulic Motors. 

COURSES IN APPLIED MECHANICS LABORATORY 
Text: Carpenter and Diederich's Experimental Engineering. 

1. — Applied Mechanics I Laboratory. Junior year, fall term. Two 
hours a week. One credit. Applied Mechanics I must accompany or pre- 
cede this course. 

This course consists of the calibration and use of laboratory measuring 
instruments and apparatus, and tests of cements and concrete aggregates. 

2. — Applied Mechanics II-CE (and II-M) . Junior year, winter term. 
Pour hours, two credits; and two hours, one credit, respectively. 

This course covers tensile, compressive, and transverse tests of wood, 
metals, and concrete, mixing and handling concrete, and for civil engi- 
neering students are tests of road-making and paving materials. 

3. — Applied Mechanics III Laboratory. Junior year, spring term. 
Five hours per week. One credit. Prerequisite: Applied Mechanics II 
Laboratory. 

This is a continuation of the work of the preceding term, with tests of 
full-size columns and beams, use of the strain gauge in determining the 
elastic stresses in structures, torsion tests of metals, tests of building 
brick and stone, and the manufacture of cast concrete specimens. 

4. — Hydraulic Laboratory. Junior year, spring term. Two hours a 
week. One credit. 

This course includes tests to determine the coefficients of weirs, orifices, 
tubes, and pipes; use and calibration of water meters; tests to determine 
loss of head in pipes due to various causes, and the measurement of water 
in open streams. Prerequisite: Applied Mechanics I Laboratory. Hy- 
draulics must accompany or precede this course. 

5. — Applied Mechanics IV Laboratory. Senior year, fall term. Two 
hours a week. One credit. Taken in connection with Applied Me- 
chanics IV. 

This course includes tests of bearings and lubricants; impact tests, 
measurements of power in transmission, and of slippage of belts. About 
half the time of the course is spent in the drafting-room in the determina- 
tion of the cyclic energy distribution at the crank shaft of a steam engine, 
and the design of flywheels for a stated degree of speed regulation. Pre- 
requisite: Applied Mechanics III. Applied Mechanics IV must accom- 
pany or precede this course. 

6. — Hydraulic Machinery Laboratory. Senior year, fall term. Two 
hours a week. One credit. Taken in connection with Hydraulic Machin- 
ery. -Prerequisite: Hydraulic Laboratory. Hydraulic Machinery must 
accompany or precede this course. 

The course includes tests on water wheels, water motors, rams, and 
pumps. 



Division of Mechanic Arts 179 

COURSES IN MECHANICAL DRAWING AND 
MACHINE DESIGN 

1. — Mechanical Drawing I. Sophomore year, fall term. Lectures 
and recitations, one hour; drafting-room practice, two hours. Two 
credits. Prerequisite: Descriptive Geometry II. 

The course includes the use and care of drawing instruments, with 
simple exercises in making working drawings from given plates. Special 
attention is given to the arrangement of views to secure balance, and to 
the subject matter and layout of titles and notes. The following sup- 
plies are required: triangles, T-square, scale, pencils, pens, ink, erasers, 
thumb tacks, drawing paper, and a set of drawing instruments. Stu- 
dents are advised not to purchase these supplies until after consulting 
with the instructor. Text, French's Engineering Drawing. 

2. — Mechanical Drawing II. Sophomore year, winter term. Lec- 
tures and recitation, one hour; drafting-room practice, four hours. Three 
credits. Prerequisites: Mechanical Drawing I; Descriptive Geometry III. 

Free-hand sketches are made from simple machine parts, followed by 
complete working drawings from these sketches without further reference 
to the objects. Special emphasis is laid upon the proper selection of 
views to present the necessary information in convenient form, and to 
give the proper dimensioning of the drawings. Text, French's Engineer- 
ing Drawing. 

3. — -Kinematics I. Sophomore year, spring term. Lectures and 
recitations, four hours. Four credits. Prerequisites: Plane Trigo- 
nometry; Descriptive Geometry II. 

An analysis of the motions and forms of the parts of machines con- 
stitutes this course. Among the subjects discussed are: bearings, screws, 
worm and wheel, rolling cylinders, cones, and other surfaces; belts, cords 
and chains, levers, cams and linkwork, with the velocity and motion 
diagrams; quick returns, straight-line motions, and other special forms 
of linkages; conjugate curves for gear teeth, cycloidal and involute sys- 
tems of gearing, spur, annular and bevel gears, and special forms of 
gearing. The solution of a large number of graphical and mathematical 
problems is required in this course. Text, Schwamb and Merrill's 
Elements of Mechanism. 

4. — Mechanical Drawing III. Sophomore year, spring term. Draft- 
ing-room practice, six hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Mechanical 
Drawing II. Kinematics I must accompany or precede this course. 

The work in the first part of the term is a continuation of that given 
in Mechanical Drawing II. This is followed by the design of cams, gears, 
and quick returns to fulfill specified conditions. Genter-line drawings 
are first made, embodying the solution of the problems, and upon these 
are built working drawings of machine parts. An effort is made to follow 
standard practice in the design of those details usually determined by 
empirical methods. Velocity diagrams are drawn for the cams and quick 
returns. Gear teeth are accurately rolled and drawn from templates 
prepared by the student. 

5. — Kinematics II. Junior year, fall term. Lectures and recitations, 
two hours; drafting-room practice, two hours. Three credits. Pre- 
requisites: Kinematics I; Mechanical Drawing III. 

This course is a continuation of Kinematics I, consisting of a con- 
sideration of the following subjects: mechanisms for producing inter- 
mittent motion, such as clicks, ratchets, and escapements; wheels in 
trains; and combinations of mechanisms. The drafting-room practice is 
a continuation of the work given in Mechanical Drawing III, and con- 
sists of the application of the classroom instruction to some simple 
problems in the design of mechanisms. Text, Schwamb and Merrill's 
Elements of Mechanism. 



180 Kansas State Agricultural College 

6. — Mechanical Drawing IV. Junior year, winter term. Drafting- 
room practice, four hours. Two credits. Prerequisite: Steam Engineer- 
ing I. Applied Mechanics II must accompany or precede this course. 

This includes the solution of a problem on the slide valve by the Zeuner 
diagram, followed by the design, mostly by empirical methods, of the 
cylinder, piston, steam chest, and valve of a steam engine. Kent's 
Mechanical Engineer's Pocketbook is extensively used for reference, and 
each student is expected to have a copy. 

7. — Machine Design I. Senior year, fall term. Lecture and recita- 
tion, one hour; drafting-room practice, four hours. Three credits. Pre- 
requisites: Mechanical Drawing III; Applied Mechanics II; and Steam 
Engineering II or Farm Motors II. 

This course includes a careful study of the fundamentals of machine 
design. The energy and force problems and the straining action in 
machine elements are considered, together with the design of these ele- 
ments to meet specified conditions as to strength and rigidity. 

The drafting-room practice consists of the solution of several prob- 
lems in design based on the principles already learned in Applied 
Mechanics. In the latter part of the term work is begun on the design of 
a steam boiler. Calculations are made to determine the dimensions of all 
parts, and working drawings are made. Text, Kimball and Barr's 
Elements of Machine Design, 

8. — Machine Design II and II-A. Senior year, winter term. Draft- 
ing-room practice, four hours. Two credits. Prerequisite: Machine 
Design I. 

This is a continuation of the work of the fall term. The design of 
the steam boiler is completed, and work is begun on the design of a 
power shear by the mechanical-engineering students, while the agri- 
cultural engineering students devote the remainder of the term to the 
design of farm machinery. 

9. — Machine Design III. Senior year, spring term. Drafting-room 
practice, six hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Machine Design II. 

This is a continuation of the work of the winter term, covering the 
completion of the design of the power shear. 

10. — Flour Mill Design I. Senior year, fall term. Lectures, two 
hours; drafting-room practice, six hours. Five credits. Prerequisites: 
Mechanical Drawing III, and Applied Mechanics II. Advanced Experi- 
mental Milling I must accompany or precede this course. 

Lectures are given on the fundamental principles of the design and 
selection of machinery for flour mills. Drafting-room practice is had in 
the design of machines and in planning the arrangement of machines in 
flour mills. 

11. — Flour Mill Design II. Senior year, winter term. Drafting- 
Toom practice, six hours. Three credits. 

This is a continuation of the work of the preceding term and includes 
the layout of flow sheets, and the diagramming of mills. 



Division of Mechanic Arts 181 



Architecture and Drawing 

Professor Waltees 
Instructor Harris 
Instructor Coith-Nelson 
Assistant Holman 
Assistant AveriiiL 
Assistant Smith 

The educational and practical value of a systematic course in the 
various branches of drawing can hardly be overestimated. The general 
aims of the several courses in industrial art are the same: (a) the cul- 
tivation of observation and analysis of form; (&) the development of 
correct taste; (c) the teaching of the different methods of graphic repre- 
sentation; (d) the acquirement of skill in handling drawing tools. 

The instruction offered in architecture is intended to supply the pre- 
liminary training required for the practice of architecture. It recognizes 
the fact that this instruction must have a three-fold object: first, the 
teaching of sound modern building construction; second, the teaching of 
different methods of graphic representation; and third, the development 
of correct taste. 

The first is attained, in connection with the work in other departments, 
by lectures, and by extended laboratory work in heating, plumbing, con- 
crete construction, steel construction, and electric lighting, also by the 
preparation of building specifications and by investigations of the legal 
and ethical relations of architect, owner, and contractor. The second end 
involves the teaching of correct perception and analysis of form. An 
average of twelve hours a week throughout the four years is given to 
projection drawing, descriptive geometry, isometric drawing, linear per- 
spective, shades and shadows, sketching from casts and from life, archi- 
tectural drawing, and architectural composition. The development of 
correct taste is sought by offering much work in sketching and rendering, 
mural decoration, landscape architecture, architectural criticism, and 
architectural composition. Five terms are devoted to the study of the 
fundamental principles of design and the styles of the past. Consid- 
erable emphasis is also laid on the problems of architecture as related to 
the needs of rural communities. 

COURSES IN ARCHITECTURE AND DRAWING 

1. — Free-hand Drawing. Freshman year, winter or spring term. 
Drafting-room practice, four hours. Two credits. 

Exercises are given in drawing simple figures and ornaments illustrat- 
ing the effects of geometric arrangement, radiation, repetition, symmetry, 
proportion, harmony, and contrast; in drawing conventional plant orna- 
ments ; in free-hand lettering. 

2. — Object Drawing. Freshman year, fall or spring term. Drafting- 
room practice? four hours. Two credits. 

The course comprises drawing from models and simple objects, and 
exercises in shading from the object and from imagination. 

3. — Geometrical Drawing. Freshman or sophomore year, winter 
term. Drafting-room practice, four hours. Two credits. 

In this course are taught construction of perpendiculars, parallels, 



182 Kansas State Agricultural College 

angles, polygons, tangent connections, etc.; construction of the ovoid, 
the oval, the ellipse, and the spiral ; the use of the T-square, triangles, the 
drawing-board, and India ink; lettering. 

4. — Descriptive Geometry I. Freshman year, fall term. Lectures, 
two hours ; drafting-room practice, two hours. Three credits. 

The course includes projection of solids; rotation in space; sections of 
solids and simple objects; development of surfaces; construction of the 
conic-section lines; isometric projection; exercises in lettering, inking, and 
shading. 

5. — Descriptive Geometry II. Freshman year, winter term. Lectures, 
two hours; drafting-room practice, two hours. Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: Descriptive Geometry I. 

The course includes projection, rotation, and measurement of the 
straight line and the angle in space; change of ground line; oblique pro- 
jection; the plane and its traces; various problems pertaining to the 
straight line and the plane. 

6. — Descriptive Geometry III. Freshman year, spring term. Lec- 
tures, two hours ; drafting-room practice, two hours. Three credits. Pre- 
requisite: Descriptive Geometry II. 

The single and double curved surfaces of revolution; their tangents 
and tangent planes ; development of surfaces of revolution ; sections and 
interpenetrations of the cylinder, the cone, and the sphere; construction 
and sections of the hyperboloid of revolution and the paraboloid form 
the matter of the course. 

7. — Color and Design I. Freshman year, spring term. Drafting- 
room practice, four hours. Two credits. 

The course includes discussion of the nature and influence of color, its 
use and abuse, and the principles that underlie good design and con- 
sistent, harmonious color combinations. Original designs in construction 
and decoration as applied to fabrics, dress, and articles of common use 
in the home are treated, that young women may recognize and appreciate 
that which is beautiful and appropriate, and may become more discrim- 
inating as purchasers. 

8. — Shades and Shadows. Sophomore year, fall term. Drafting- 
room practice, four hours. Two credits. Prerequisite: Descriptive 
Geometry II. 

Shadows upon the planes of projection; shadows upon oblique planes 
and curved surfaces; shades; exercises in brush shading, constitute the 
subject matter of the course. 

9. — Residences. Sophomore year, fall term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. 

The course comprises lectures on location, arrangement, construction, 
decoration, and sanitation of residences; study of modern residence 
styles ; drawing to scale of plans, elevations, sections, and details of char- 
acteristic residences, involving construction in lumber, brick, stone, and 
concrete. 

10 to 12. — Architectural Drawing I, II, and III. Sophomore year, 
fall, winter, and spring terms. Drafting-room practice, six hours; three 
credits. 

The first term is given to the study of Gothic and Romanesque orna- 
ments, tracery windows, and other details, from plaster models and blue- 
prints. The second term takes up the analysis and study of standard 
forms of the five orders. The third is devoted to the study of the modern 
residence and the school building. 



Division of Mechanic Arts 183 

13. — Historic Ornament. Sophomore year, winter term. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. 

This is a course of illustrated lectures on the standard forms of Greek, 
Roman, and Gothic moldings; the Etruscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian and 
composite columns and their entablatures; the lotus, anthemion, acan- 
thus, and laurel ornament; Roman, medieval, and modern lettering; the 
ornament of the Gothic period. 

14. — Linear Perspective. Sophomore year, winter term. Drafting- 
room practice, four hours. Two credits. Prerequisite: Geometrical 
Drawing. 

Vanishing points, vanishing traces, measuring points, cylindric per- 
spective and perspective corrections, are emphasized, and various exer- 
cises in representing geometric solids are given. 

15. — Working Drawings. Sophomore year, spring term. Drafting- 
room practice, four hours. Two credits. 

This course comprises designing and drawing residence plans to scale; 
detail drawing of furniture and various modern conveniences. 

16. — Clay Modeling. Junior year, fall term. Laboratory, six hours. 
Three credits. 

This course includes clay and plaster modeling of architectural details, 
historic ornaments, and decorative statuary; also methods of making 
plaster casts. 

17. — Color and Design A. Junior year, winter term. Laboratory, six 
hours. Three credits. 

The influence and nature of color, and the principles that underlie good 
design and harmonious color combinations. The use and abuse of color 
in building operations. 

18. — History of Architecture I. Junior year, fall term. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. 

This study is taught by lectures, illustrated by photographs, plaster 
models, and stereopticon views. It deals with the development of the 
architecture of the ancient Egyptians, Chaldeans, Greeks, and Romans. 

19. — History of Architecture II. Junior year, winter term. Class 
work, four hours. Four credits. 

This course comprises a study of the architecture of the medieval and 
Renaissance periods — Byzantine, Romanesque, Moorish, Gothic, and 
Renaissance. 

20. — History of Architecture III. Junior year, spring term. Class 
work, four hours. Four credits. 

A study is made of the neo-Greek and the neo-Roman architecture ; the 
revival of the Gothic and the Romanesque; the Colonial, the Mission, and 
modern American architecture. 

21 to 25. — Architectural Composition I, II, III, IV, V. Beginning 
with the fall term of the junior year and extending through ^.ve con- 
secutive terms. Drafting-room practice, six hours a week. Three credits 
each term. 

The first term is given to the planning of a residence, and involves 
the preparation of a complete set of plans and elevations, sections and 
detail drawings. The second term takes up the planning of a Gothic 
church. The third is given to the planning of a Romanesque school 
building. The fourth takes up the planning of a small public building in 
the modern Renaissance. The fifth is given to work in modern steel 
and concrete architecture of a monumental style. Sets of blue-prints of 
all finished work must be left with the department, if required by the 
professor in charge of the work. 



184 Kansas State Agricultural College 

26. — Heating. Junior year, winter term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. 

The subject is taught by lectures dealing with the phenomena and laws 
of heat generation and propagation, systems of heating by means of air, 
water, and steam, modern methods of ventilation. 

27.— Mural Decoration. Junior year, spring term. Drafting-room 
practice, six -hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Color and Design A. 

Each student is required to make a series of large water-color studies 
of interior wall-decoration schemes, including original designs for borders 
and centerpieces. 

28. — Public Buildings. Senior year, fall term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Prerequisites: Residences; Historic Ornament. 

The course embraces lectures on location, floor arrangement, build- 
ing materials, style, interior finish, decoration, etc., of schoolhouses, 
churches, libraries, courthouses, exposition buildings, and other public 
buildings. 

29. — Plumbing. Senior year, fall term. Class work, two hours. Two 
credits. Prerequisite : Sanitary Biology I and II. 

This course comprises lectures on water supply, plumbing and sewer- 
ing of residences; study of city plumbing ordinances and of disposition 
of sewage. 

30. — Municipal Improvements. Senior year, fall term. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. 

This is a course of lectures on sidewalk construction, guttering and 
paving, sanitary sewers and sewage disposition, water supply, etc. 

31. — Beams and Arches. Senior year, fall term. Class work, three 
hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Graphic Statics. 

This is a course of lectures on the statics of steel and wood beams, 
posts, and struts, stone lintels, arches and concrete, reinforced concrete 
construction. Text, Kidder's Handbook for Architects. 

32. — Ink Rendering. Senior year, fall term. Drafting-room practice, 
four hours. Two credits. Prerequisite: Linear Perspective. 

The course includes perspectives of buildings and ornamental details; 
rendering in ink; studio methods. 

33. — Trusses. Senior year, winter term. Class work, two hours; 
laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Prerequisite: Beams and Arches. 

The course deals with methods of construction and graphic analysis of 
standard wood and steel trusses. Text, Kidder's Handbook for Architects. 

34. — Specifications. Senior year, winter term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. 

The course comprises discussion and preparation of standard specifica- 
tions for some of the residences and public buildings planned by the stu- 
dent in the classes in composition; estimates of the materials and labor 
required in erecting and completing these buildings; methods of making 
lump estimates; discussion of the principles and form of building con- 
tracts; study of the legal relations of the architect, the owner, and the 
contractor; discussion of state laws concerning the erection of public 
buildings; labor laws; lien laws; city ordinances; building permits; 
building insurance; contracts and bonds. 

35. — Architectural Seminar. Senior year, winter term. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. 

The course includes a critical study of public buildings, such as the 
Manhattan library, the Riley County courthouse, the buildings of the 
College, etc., as well as study and discussion of the work of American 



Division of Mechanic Arts 185 

architects, such as Smithmeyer, Upjohn, and Richardson. A critical 
study is made of the competitive designs for the Cathedral of St. John 
the Divine, New York, the building of the University of California, etc. 

36. — Color Rendering. Senior year, winter term. Drafting-room 
practice, four hours. Two credits. 

This is a course in rendering of buildings with their landscape environ- 
ments, by means of ink or sepia washes, or in water color. 

37. — Home Architecture. Senior year, winter term. Drafting-room 
practice, four hours. Two credits. Required in the course in home 
economics. 

This is a study, and drawing in ink, of floor plans, details, and front 
elevations of modern residences. 

38. — Home Decoration. Senior year, spring term. Drafting-room 
practice, four hours. Two credits. Required in the course in home 
economics. 

This is a study of design in its application to the home, its plan, furni- 
ture, and decorations. Emphasis is laid upon the refining and educating 
influence of well-chosen and appropriate decoration, the importance of 
simplicity being urged. Lectures are given on the tine arts and, the 
handicrafts, teaching that the home should show that fine art and in- 
dustrial art are not to be considered separately. Problems in planning 
and decorating houses are discussed, 

39. — Landscape Architecture. Senior year, spring term. Class 
work, four hours. Four credits. 

The principles of landscape design, location and construction of roads 
and walks, the disposition of trees, shrubs, lawns, and water as landscape 
features are discussed and studied. 

40. — Landscape Design. Senior year, spring term. Drafting-room 
practice, eight hours. Four credits. 

Each student is required to draw and finish in water color a set of 
plates representing his original designs for a home lot, a public square, a 
campus, and a small park. 

41. — Architectural Thesis. Senior year, spring term. Drafting- 
room practice, fourteen hours. Seven credits. 

In the winter and spring of the senior year the student prepares a 
thesis, consisting of a set of original drawings, complete with details and 
specifications, for a public building. This work must be done in the 
drafting room of the department and under the supervision of the pro- 
fessor of architecture, who decides on the cost limit and style of the 
building and the size and number of plates required. 

42. — Farm Architecture. Elective, spring term. Drafting-room 
practice, eight hours. Four credits. 

The course comprises the preparation of drawings and specifications 
for barns, dairy stables, and other farm buildings. 



186 Kansas State Agricultural College 



Civil and Highway Engineering 

Professor Conbad 
Professor Geabhart 
Associate Professor Walker 
Instructor Frazieb 

The instruction in civil and highway engineering is given by means 
of lectures and recitations, and by the practice in the field, in the drafting 
room, and in the laboratory. The technical work begins in the fall term 
of the sophomore year, in which the work in surveying is started. The 
heaviest technical work of the course falls in the junior and senior years, 
during which, in addition to studies in other departments, courses are 
given in civil engineering drawing and in the analysis of stresses and 
framed structures, structural design, drainage and irrigation engineer- 
ing, construction and design in masonry and concrete, railways, highway 
engineering, astronomy, and geodesy. During the entire senior year 
considerable time is devoted to thesis work. 

In addition to the laboratory equipment found in the mechanical and 
electrical engineering laboratories, which is available to civil engineering 
students as well, the Department of Civil and Highway Engineering 
possesses a good assortment of transits, levels, plane tables, tapes, and 
chains. 

COURSES IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

1. — Surveying. Sophomore year, fall and spring terms. Class work, 
one hour; field work, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Trigo- 
nometry. 

This is a brief course in the care and use of engineer's surveying 
instruments. The greater part of the time is devoted to exercises and 
practical problems involving the use of the transit and level. Text, 
Pence and Ketchum's Surveying Manual. 

2. — Surveying I. Fall term. Class work, four hours ; field and draft- 
ing-room work, six hours. Seven credits. Prerequisite: Trigonometry. 

The textbook work in this course deals with the use and care of in- 
struments, land topographic and hydrographic surveying. The field and 
drafting work is devoted to exercises in the use of engineer's surveying 
instruments and plotting plane surveys. Text, J. B. Johnson's Theory 
and Practice of Surveying. 

3. — Foundations. Spring term. Class work, three hours. Three 
credits. 

This course is devoted to a study of the principles underlying the 
design and construction of foundations of all characters in common use 
at the present time. Text, Fowler's Ordinary Foundations. 

4. — Surveying II. Fall term. Class work, four hours; field and 
drafting-room work, six hours. Seven credits. Prerequisites: Sur- 
veying I. 

Recitation work in this course deals with city and mine surveying, 
computations of volumes, and railroad curves. The field and drafting 
work is devoted principally to topographical surveying and plotting. 
Text, J. B. Johnson's Theory and Practice of Surveying. 

5. — Civil Engineering Drawing I. Winter term. Drafting-room 
work, four hours. Two credits. Prerequisites: Mechanical Drawing 1 
I and II. 



Division of Mechanic Arts 187 

This course is devoted to the application of the elementary principles 
of stereotomy, shades and shadows, isometric drawing, and perspective. 
These principles are explained to the student by such short lectures as 
seem necessary for the purpose. No textbook is used. 

6. — Civil Engineering Drawing II. Spring term. Drafting-room 
work, eight hours. Four credits. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 
Drawing I. 

This is, during the first part of the term, a continuation of the course 
in graphic statics. About three-fourths of the term is devoted to the 
design of roof trusses of timber and steel. Text to be selected. 

7. — Bridge Stresses. Fall term. Class work, four hours. Four 
credits. Prerequisites: Applied Mechanics I and II. 

This course involves the study of the algebraic method of computing 
the stresses in bridges and buildings, leading up to the subjeet of struc- 
tural design the following term. Text, Merriman and Jacoby's Roofs 
and Bridges, Part I. 

8. — Water Supply and Sewerage. Fall term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Prerequisite : Hydraulics. 

This course deals briefly with the problems of designing and construct- 
ing sewer systems and disposal plants for cities of moderate size. Water 
supply for cities is studied from the standpoints of consumption, collec- 
tion, storage, distribution, and purification. Texts, Turneaure & Russell's 
Public Water Supplies and Folwell's Sewerage. 

9. — Bridge Design. Winter term. Class work, three hours; drafting- 
room exercises, six hours. Six credits. Prerequisites: Bridge Stresses, 
and Civil Engineering Drawing II. 

This is a study of the design of timber and of metal structures. In 
the drafting-room the time is chiefly devoted to working out the details 
of a plate girder and of a railroad or highway bridge. Text, Merriman 
and Jacoby's Roofs and Bridges, Part III. 

10. — Railways I. Winter term. Class work, three hours. Three 
credits. Prerequisites: Surveying I and II. 

This is a short course in the theory of railroad engineering based 
on Wellington's economic theory. Considerable time* is also devoted to 
the study of track construction and maintenance, and of the design of 
the yards and terminals. Text, Raymond's Elements of Railroad Engi- 
neering, and Nagel's Field Manual for Railroad Engineers. 

11. — Masonry and Concrete. Winter term. Class work, three 
hours; drafting-room work, four hours. Five credits. Prerequisites: 
Applied Mechanics I, II, and III. 

The classroom work takes up the study of the design and construc- 
tion of structures of masonry and concrete, both plain and reinforced. 
The time spent in the draf ting „room is devoted to the design of concrete 
and masonry retaining walls, dams, arches, slab and girder bridges. 
Text, Taylor and Thompson's Concrete. 

12. — Structures. Winter term. Three recitations per week and six 
hours in the drawing room. Six credits. Prerequisites: Applied Me- 
chanics II, and Drainage and Irrigation I. 

This course is devoted to a study of the design and construction of 
the various structures of timber, steel, masonry and concrete with which 
the irrigation engineer has to deal. Text to be selected. 

13. — Astronomy. Winter term. Class work, two hours; laboratory, 
two hours. Three credits. Prerequisites: Trigonometry, Surveying II. 

This course is given as a preparation for geodesy the following term. 
The course, as given, is a practical one, designed to familiarize the stu- 



188 Kansas State Agricultural College 

dent with methods of determining latitude, longitude, and azimuth with 
the ordinary engineer's surveying instruments. Text, Hosmer's Practical 
Astronomy, 

14. — Railways II. Spring term. Drafting-room or field exercises, 
eight hours. Four credits. Prerequisite : Railway Engineering I. 

This is a continuation of the preceding course. The time is devoted 
principally to the field and office work of railway engineering. In the 
field a reconnoissance and survey of a short line is made, and the office 
work consists in working up the maps, profiles, and estimates from the 
survey. Texts, Raymond's. Elements of Railroad Engineering, and 
Nagle's Field Manual for Railroad Engineers. 

15. — Geodesy. Spring term. Class work, two hours ; field work, four 
hours. Four credits. Prerequisites: Surveying I and II; Astronomy. 

Here the precise methods of surveying and leveling are studied. In 
the field the time is devoted to practice with the plane table, base-line 
measurement, triangulation, and precise leveling. Text, J. B. Johnson's 
Theory and Practice of Surveying. 

COURSES IN HIGHWAY ENGINEERING 

1. — Highway Engineering. Spring term. Class work, three hours. 
Three credits. 

The work in the class room is devoted to a study of the theory and 
practice of economic highway and pavement construction and main- 
tenance, including a study of the needs of traffic, of its effect on the road 
surface, and of the materials of construction. Text, Baker's Roads and 
Pavements. 

2. — Highway Engineering I. Fall term. Four recitations a week and 
six hours in the laboratory. Seven credits. 

The recitation work deals with the economics of highway location, 
construction and maintenance, dealing principally with country highways. 
The laboratory work is devoted to a study of the characteristics of the 
principal road-building materials and the standard methods of testing. 
Text to be selected. 

3. — Highway Engineering II. Winter term. Four recitations a week. 
Four credits. Prerequisite : Highway Engineering I. 

This course is devoted principally to a study of the construction and 
maintenance of modern types of improved surfaces for roads and pave- 
ments. Texts to be selected. 

4. — Highway Engineering III. Spring term. Three recitations a 
week; eight hours of field and drawing-room work. Seven credits. Pre- 
requisite: Highway Engineering II. 

The recitation work is devoted to a study of road laws and adminis- 
tration in the various sections of the United States and Europe. The 
field and drawing-room work aims to give* the student practice in making 
surveys for highways, mapping, making estimates and drawing up 
specifications. Texts to be selected. 

5. — Specifications and Inspection. Spring term. Two recitations. 
Two credits. Prerequisite: Highway Engineering II. 

This is a course dealing with the matter of drawing specifications for 
various standard types of road construction and the inspections of ma- 
terials and construction work. Text to be selected. 

6. — Road Machinery Laboratory. Fall term. Four hours laboratory 
work; Two credits. 

The design of this course is to familiarize the student with the con- 
struction and use of machinery used in the construction and maintenance 
of roads. 



Division of Mechanic Arts 189 

COURSES IN IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE ENGINEERING 

1. — Drainage and Irrigation I. Fall term. Class work, three hours. 
Three credits. Prerequisite : Hydraulics. 

In this course a study is made of the application of engineering prin- 
ciples to the design and construction of drainage and irrigation works. 
Considerable attention is paid to the development of ground- water sup- 
plies for irrigation. Any senior engineering student may enter the 
course. Texts, Elliot's Engineering for Land Drainage, and Newell and 
Murphy's Principles of Irrigation Engineering. 

2. — Drainage and Irrigation II. Winter term. Three recitations a 
week. Three credits. Prerequisite: Drainage and Irrigation I. 

This is a library and textbook course dealing primarily with the agri- 
cultural side of drainage and irrigation. Among the questions consid- 
ered are the amount of water required by different crops, the best time to 
apply water for different crops, the effect on various crops of the depth 
below the surface of ground water, methods of preventing the deposits of 
salts injurious to vegetation and of removing existing deposits of such 
salts. Text to be selected. 

3. — Drainage and Irrigation III. Spring term. Field and drafting- 
room work, six hours. Three credits. 

It is the aim of this course to give the student practice in the surveys 
for drainage and irrigation projects, plotting maps and drawing up 
specifications and estimates. 



Electrical Engineering 



Professor 

Professor Hamilton, in Charge 
Assistant Professor Lane 
Instructor MoNaib 

Instruction in this course is given by means of textbooks, lectures, and 
laboratory periods. The class work is carefully illustrated by means of 
demonstration apparatus and the projection lantern. The course is 
designed to provide the necessary preparation for young men who desire 
to engage in the practical field of electrical engineering, or for those who 
desire to assume the control of central stations as managers, as super- 
intendents, or as consulting engineers. 

The electrical laboratory for the work of the third year is provided 
with standard instruments of measurements, including standards of 
resistance, self-induction, capacity, etc. A complete line of standard 
makes of ammeters, voltmeters, wattmeters, and galvanometers is also 
provided. The different laboratories of the department are supplied with 
electric current from the following sources: 120-volt storage-battery 
circuit; 110-volt direct-current circuit; 110-volt alternating-current cir- 
cuit; 220-volt direct-current circuit. Voltages up to 60,000 can be pro- 
duced in the dynamo laboratory for testing purposes. 

The electrical engineering laboratory is provided with a number of 
standard commercial machines, among them a 30-kilowatt 2300-volt 
polyphase alternating-current generator, a 15-kilowatt 125-volt alter- 
nating-current generator, a 7 % -kilowatt synchronous converter, single- 
and three-phase induction motors, a 5-horsepower phase-wound induc- 
tion motor, a 20-horsepower auxiliary pole 220-volt direct-current motor, 



190 Kansas State Agricultural College 

a 26-horsepower 220-volt direct-current motor, a 15-kilowatt 125-volt 
generator, a 4% -kilowatt 125-volt direct-current generator, a Wood arc 
machine, a 60-cell 160-ampere-hour storage battery, current trans- 
formers, arc lamps, constant potential transformers, 20,000- and 60,000- 
volt testing transformers, marble and slate switchboards, a Tirrel regu- 
lator, speed controllers, and a full line of ammeters, voltmeters, watt- 
meters, etc., for testing purposes. 

COURSES IN ELECTEICAL ENGINEERING 

1. — Theory of Electricity I. Junior year, fall term. Recitations 
and lectures, four hours ; laboratory, two hours. Five credits. Prerequi- 
sites: Engineering Physics II; Calculus III. 

This course is an extension of the work in electricity in Engineering 
Physics II, and is a prerequisite to work in electrical engineering proper. 
A study is made of the phenomena and fundamental laws and principles 
of static electricity, the galvanic current, magnetism, and electromag- 
netism. Emphasis is laid upon the ultimate importance to the student 
of a thorough understanding of these subjects. Text, Pender's Principles 
of Electrical Engineering. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory course continues the work of the class- 
room in giving the application of the fundamental principles, the ex- 
periments being so arranged as to follow the theoretical development of 
the subject. 

2. — Theory of Electricity II. Junior year, winter term. Recitations 
and lectures, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Pre- 
requisite: Theory of Electricity I. 

This course is a continuation of the work begun in the fall term. It 
deals primarily with the general principles of electromagnetic induction, 
and gives an elementary treatment of alternating currents, including the 
effect of inductance and capacity. Text, Pender's Principles of Electricdl 
Engineering. 

Laboratory. — This work is a continuation of the laboratory work done 
in the preceding course, and gives the student a wide range of work in 
the use and manipulation of some of the higher-grade instruments used 
in electrical measurements. 

3. — Direct-Current Machines I. Junior year, winter term. Recita- 
tions or lectures, four hours; laboratory, four hours. Six credits. Pre- 
requisite: Theory of Electricity II. 

The work consists of a detailed study of the fundamental principles 
of magnetic and electric circuits and their application to the various 
types of direct-current machines. Numerous problems involving the 
application of the principles are given as a part of the course. The class 
work is planned to coordinate with the work in the electrical engineering 
laboratory. Text, Franklin and Estey's Elements of Electrical Engineer- 
ing, Vol. I. 

Laboratory. — A series of experiments is outlined which is designed 
to necessitate careful, accurate measurement. The student is obliged to 
make all electrical connections with the necessary instruments in the 
circuit and to record the required data. From the laboratory records 
a written report upon each experiment or test must be submitted. The 
laboratory exercises include tests for armature and field resistance, po- 
tential curves, machine characteristics, motor and generator efficiencies. 

4. — Direct-Current Machines II. Junior year, spring term. Lec- 
tures or recitations, fotir hours; electrical engineering laboratory, four 
hours. Six credits. Prerequisite: Direct-Current Machines I. 



Division of Mechanic Arts 191 

This course is a continuation of Direct-Current Machines I. It in- 
volves a detailed study of the various types of direct-current machinery 
with respect to theory and operation. The latter part of the course is 
devoted to a special examination of the different methods of testing 
generators and motors, and to the special application of the different 
classes of machines to commercial uses. Text, Franklin and Estey's Ele- 
ments of Electrical Engineering, Vol. I. 

Laboratory. — Special attention is given in this course to the different 
methods of determining generator and motor efficiencies and to the 
proper tabulation and interpretation of results. 

5. — Electrical Instruments and Calibration. Junior year, spring 
term. Lectures and recitations, two hours; calibration laboratory, four 
hours. Four credits. Prerequisites: Theory of Electricity I and II. 

This course includes a study of the different types of electrical meas- 
uring instruments and their application to electrical engineering testing. 
Text, Roller's Electric and Magnetic Measurements, supplemented by 
lectures. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work in this subject includes the cali- 
bration of both direct- and alternating-current measuring instruments 
and their uses in measuring current, potential power, resistance, in- 
ductance, and capacity. 

6. — Direct-Current Machine Design. Senior year, fall term. Lec- 
tures, two hours; computation, four hours. Four credits. Prerequisite: 
Direct-current Machines II. 

The purpose of the course is to acquaint the student with the prin- 
ciples of commercial design of direct-current machinery. Each student 
is required to make the necessary calculations and drawings for a direct- 
current generator. 

7. — Alternating-Current Machines I. Senior year, fall term. Reci- 
tations or lectures, four hours; laboratory, four hours. Six credits. 
Prerequisites: Calculus III, Theory of Electricity II. 

The work consists of a mathematical treatment of alternating-current 
phenomena. A study is made of the vector method of treating alternat- 
ing-current problems. The solution of problems involving single and 
polyphase circuits forms an important part of the course. Text, Frank- 
lin and Estey's Elements of Electrical Engineering, Vol. I; Swenson and 
Frankenfield's Testing of Electromagnetic Machinery. 

Laboratory. — It is the aim of this course to provide a series of experi- 
ments illustrating the theoretical work of the lecture room. Practice is 
given in the accurate measurement of capacity and inductance, and the 
effect of each upon the circuit. The latter part of the course is devoted 
to a study of polyphase circuits. 

8. — Electrical Engineering M-I. Senior year, fall term. Lectures 
or recitations, four hours; laboratory, two hours. Five credits. Pre- 
requisites: Engineering Physics II and Calculus III. 

This course covers the subject of direct-current machines with reference 
to the fundamental laws of the electric circuit; the principles of direct- 
current machinery; and the more important commercial tests. Text, 
Sheldon's Direct-Current Machines. 

Laboratory. — Practice is given in the proper use of electrical measur- 
ing instruments. The experiments include a variety of tests requiring ac- 
curate observation, and a knowledge of the theory of dynamo machines. 
The various standard characteristic and efficiency tests are given. A 
written report on each test is required. 

9. — Electrical Engineering M-II. Senior year, winter term. Lec- 
tures and recitations, four hours; laboratory, two hours. Five credits. 
Prerequisites : Engineering Physics II ; Calculus III. 



192 Kansas State Agricultural College 

The work covers briefly the important principles of alternating-current 
phenomena. The leading types of alternating-current machinery and 
apparatus are discussed with reference to their operation and their 
adaptability to different classes of service. Text, Sheldon's Alternating- 
Current Machines. 

Laboratory. — The experimental work in this course includes practice 
in the use of alternating-current instruments; standard tests of alter- 
nators, motors, and transformers; and methods of operating the dif- 
ferent types of alternating-current machinery. 

10. — Alternating-Current Machines II. Senior year, winter term. 
Recitations or lectures, four hours; laboratory, four hours. Six credits. 
Prerequisite: Alternating-Current Machines I. 

This is a continuation of Alternating-Current Machines I. The course 
consists of a study of the theory of alternating-current machinery, alter- 
nators, synchronous motors, induction motors, transformers, and the vari- 
ous devices used in connection with alternating-current work. A study is 
also made of the application of the different types of machinery to indus- 
trial uses. Text, Franklin and Estey's Elements of Electrical Engineer- 
ing, Vol. II; Swenson and Frankenfield's Testing of Electro-Magnetic 
Machinery. 

Laboratory. — This laboratory course consists of a series of experi- 
ments involving special and commercial tests of alternators, synchronous 
motors, transformers, and the different types of alternating-current ma- 
chinery and apparatus. 

11. — Illuminating Engineering. Senior year, spring term. Lectures 
or recitations, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Three credits. 

This course is devoted to a study of photometry and light standards 
and the principles of illumination. The different types of incandescent 
and arc lamps are discussed with reference to their efficiency and adapta- 
bility to different classes of lighting. Systems of street illumination are 
also studied. 

12. — Telephone Engineering. Senior year, winter term. Class work, 
three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. 

This course consists of a consideration of the principles of acoustics 
and alternating phenomena involved in telephone practice. A detailed 
investigation is made of telephone apparatus and circuits, with reference 
to their adaption to various kinds of telephone service. This is followed 
by a study both of the design and maintenance of telephone lines and 
central-office apparatus, and of central-office methods, the selection of 
apparatus, and methods of handling telephone traffic. Text, Abbots's 
Telephony. 

13. — Electrical Engineering C. Senior year, spring term. Recita- 
tions or lectures, three hours; laboratory practice, two hours. Required 
in the course in civil engineering. Prerequisites: Engineering Physics 
III; Calculus III. 

This work is designed to cover briefly the fundamental principles of 
direct-current and alternating-current machinery. Emphasis is laid upon 
the proper installation and operation of the different classes of machines. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory practice is designed to give the student a 
knowledge of the most important commercial tests. The proper use of 
electrical instruments is emphasized. A written report of each laboratory 
test is required. 

14. — Alternating-Current Machine Design. Senior year, spring 
term. Lectures, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Two credits. Pre- 
requisite: Alternating-Current Machines II. 

This course embraces the elementary principles underlying the design 
of alternating-current apparatus. Students are required to make calcula- 
tions and drawings for an alternating-current machine. 



Division of Mechanic Arts 193 

15, — Generation and Distribution of Electrical Energy. Senior 
year, spring term. Recitations or lectures, four hours. Four credits. 

This course is designed to cover station operation and management, 
methods of power transmission, and systems of distribution. Each stu- 
dent is assigned an important electrical power station, upon which a de- 
tailed written report is required. Text, Ferguson's Elements of Electrical 
Transmission. 

16. — Power Plant Designs and Specifications. Senior year, spring 
term. Lectures, one hour; laboratory, six hours. Four credits. 

This work relates to the design and equipment of a modern power, 
plant. Complete specifications for the necessary machinery and appa- 
ratus, with drawings showing the plan of the building and the location of 
the machinery and apparatus, are required. 

17. — Power and Lighting. Senior year, spring term. Glass work, 
three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. 

The work is planned to cover briefly the principles of illumination, 
the proper distribution of lighting units, photometric measurements, and 
inspection work, as based on the National Electric Code. 

18. — Seminar E-I, E-II. Junior year, fall and winter terms, and 
senior year, winter term, respectively. The first course has one hour of 
class work with one credit; the last is a two-hour course with two credits. 

The work of this course is intended to give students of electrical 
engineering the opportunity to keep informed regarding the latest inven- 
tions and research work along the special line which they have chosen. 
Reviews of current electrical literature are required, and class discus- 
sions of articles reviewed are made the basis of the class work. 

19. — Thesis. Required in the course in electrical engineering. 

The selection of a subject for thesis work, in consultation with the 
head of the department, is made at the beginning of the winter term. The 
work is continued during the winter and spring terms. Every opportunity 
is given the student to work out original ideas as to design or operation. 



Printing 

Superintendent Steotheb 
Assistant Allen 

The Department of Printing had its inception when The Kansas 
Industrialist was established, in 1875. The demands made upon the 
department have necessitated a gradual increase in equipment and facili- 
ties, until at present it occupies the entire first floor and basement of 
Kedzie Hall. In addition to printing and mailing The Kansas Indus- 
trialist each week during the College year, the large amount of general 
printing for the numerous departments of the College furnishes a wide 
range of work and keeps the plant in constant operation during the 
entire twelve months. 

From the beginning, printing-trade practice has been offered to 
students, as the facilities of the department make possible. 

Composing Room. The equipment consists of ten racks of body type, 
two dumps, galley racks, proof press, ten cabinets of display type, five 
imposing stones, two lead and slug racks, make-up rack, ink stones, 
galleys, chases, and other accessories. 
—7 



194 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Folding and Stock Room. The equipment consists of tables for hand 
folding, two wire-stitching machines, one 32-inch power paper cutter, one 
26-inch hand cutter, one interchangeable perforating, punching, and round- 
cornering machine, racks for storing stock, and other necessary appliances. 

Pressroom. The equipment consists of one two-revolution cylinder 
press, one drum-cylinder press, three platen presses, one imposing stone, 
drying racks, tables, trucks, and other accessories. All machines requiring 
power are driven by individual electric motors. 



Shop Practice 

Associate Professor Carlson 
Instructor HotJSK 
Instructor Hollas 
Instructor Haye? 
Instructor Grant 
Assistant Yost 
Assistant Parkee 
Assistant Turnbull, 
Assistant Lathrop 
Assistant Ball 
Assistant Brakbman 
Assistant 

The work in the shops is planned to meet the needs of three classes 
of students: (1) those in the course in agriculture who expect to use 
the skill gained in the shops in their after work on the farm; (2) those 
in the manual-training option of the course in general science who need 
to secure a sufficient knowledge of the principles underlying shop work, 
and sufficient skill in the performance of various operations, to be able 
to instruct others; (3) those in the courses in engineering whose need 
is to secure a thorough knowledge of the methods of performing various 
kinds of shop work; of the machine best suited for the different purposes; 
of the amount of work that may be expected of the different machines 
and from the workmen under different conditions. 

The equipment of the Department of Shop Practice is set forth to a 
certain extent below. 

Wood Shop. This room is 40 by 90 feet; it contains 252 separate sets 
of tools, and benches for 60 students in each class. 

Pattern Shop. This room is 45 by 81 feet, and contains sixteen ten- 
inch by f our-and-one-half-f oot wood-turning lathes and one eighteen-inch 
by twelve-foot J. A. Fay & Co. pattern makers' lathe fully equipped with 
tools and chucks; eight pattern makers' double benches, equipped with 
rapid-acting vises and a complete set of tools. 

Woodworking Machinery Room. This room is 35 x 42 feet, and con- 
tains one Dietzwell wood planer, one Cordsman Meyers f riezer, one thirty- 
four-inch band saw, one Beach jig *saw, one Fay Combination circular 
saw, one Fay & Egan power mortiser, one Fay & Egan sandpapering 
machine, one K. S. A. C. sensitive drill, one Seneca Falls foot mortiser, 
besides the necessary grindstones and work benches. 

Machine Shop. This room is 40 by 170 feet, and contains thirteen 
engine lathes, as follows: One fourteen-inch Hendey-Norton lathe, two 
fourteen-inch Flather lathes, one thirteen-inch Lodge & Davis lathe, one 
sixteen-inch Lodge & Shipley combination engine and turret lathe, two 
fourteen-inch Reed lathes, five fourteen-inch K. S. A. C. lathes, and one 



Division of Mechanic Arts 195 

twenty-eight-inch by twenty-foot American lathe equipped with 'block to 
raise it to sixty-inch swing, one K. S. A. C. speed lathe, one Brown & 
Sharp No. 2 universal milling machine, one K. S. A. C. (Hendey-Norton 
pattern) shaper, one K. S. A. C. (Pratt & Whitney patterns) shaper, one 
Gray twenty-six-inch by six-foot planer, one Niles fifty-one-inch vertical 
turning and boring mill, one Baker Bros, key seater, one Barnes thirty- 
four-inch self-feed drill press, one Rogers twelve-inch sensitive drill 
press, twoK. S. A. C. twelve-inch sensitive drill presses, one K. S. A. C. 
(Bemis Miles patterns) twenty-inch double-traverse quick-return shaper, 
two Morse & Dexter valve reseating machines, one Walker universal 
grinder, one K. S. A. C. special drill grinder, one power hack saw, one 
Emerson direct-connected motor polishing machine, one bolt and pipe 
machine taking pipe up to two inches, one pipe machine taking pipe up 
to eight inches, benches and tools for fifty students, and a tool room 
completely stocked with the necessary tools. 

Blacksmith Shop. This room is 50 x 100 feet, and is equipped with 
thirty-three Sturtevant down-draft forges for students' use and two large 
special Sturtevant forges for general use. Each forge has anvil and 
complete set of forging tools, and is supplied with forced draft and power 
exhaust. In addition to the general tools for a fully equipped blacksmith 
shop, there is also installed a drill press, punch and shear, emery 
grinder, tire bender, tire shrinker, and a number of pieces of special 
apparatus built by the department. 

Iron Foundry. This room is 27x100 feet. It is equipped with a 
one-and-one-half-ton Calliau cupola, one-and-one-half-ton K. S. A. C. steel 
crane, core oven five by six by seven feet (arranged so that it can be 
heated with either coke or gas), one car, track and turntable, one two- 
by-three-foot K. S. A. C. rumbler, one K. S. A. C. emery grinder, one 
K. S. A. C. molding machine, an exceptionally large number of flasks, 
both wood and iron, ladles, etc. 

Brass Foundry. This room is 24 x 34 feet. It is equipped with one 
twenty-one by thirty-six-inch brass furnace, crucibles, flasks, molding 
tubs, benches, cases, racks and all necessary tools for bench and floor 
molding. 

Amphitheater. This room is 54x54% feet. It is adjacent to the 
blacksmith shop and iron and brass foundries, and is equipped with forge, 
anvil and forge tools, bench, molding trough and molding too t ls, black- 
board, etc., for lectures and demonstration work. 

Locker Room. This room is 36 x 40 feet. It is conveniently located, 
and is equipped with 244 special metal lockers for the use of students 
taking work in the machine shop, blacksmith shop, foundry and engineer- 
ing laboratory. A portion of this is made a separate locker-room and 
bath-room for the use of the shop foreman, and contains seven metal 
lockers. 

COURSES IN SHOP PRACTICE 

1. — Blacksmithing I. Lecture, one hour; shop work, four hours. 
Three credits. 

This is a course in the forging of iron, and is designed to teach the 
principles and operations of drawing, bending, upsetting, welding, twist- 
ing, splitting, and punching. A study is made of the manufacture of 
iron and steel, composition and heat treatment of steel, and of the proper 
methods of making forgings and tools. Tools required: a two-foot rule 
and a pair of five-inch outside calipers. 

2. — Blacksmithing II. Shop work, four hours. Two credits. Pre- 
requisite: Blacksmithing I. 

Advanced work in the forging of iron and in the manufacture of steel 
tools. Instruction is given in hardening, tempering, case-hardening and 
annealing. Tools required: same as Blacksmithing I. 



196 Kansas State Agricultural College 

3. — Foundry. Lecture, one hour; shop work, four hours. Three 
credits. 

Practice is given in floor, bench and machine molding, in core making, 
and in casting in iron, copper, brass, and special alloys. A study is also 
made of modern foundry construction, equipment, materials and methods. 

4. — Pattern Making. Lecture, one hour; shop work, four hours. 
Three credits. Prerequisite: Foundry. 

This course comprises a series of exercises embodying the principles 
governing pattern construction in making plain and split patterns, in- 
cluding core prints and core boxes, after which practical patterns are 
made of machines and machine parts. 

5. — Machine Shop I. Shop work, four hours. Two credits. Pre- 
requisite: Foundry. ! 

Practice is given in chipping, filing, shaper and planer work, scraping, 
drilling, and the cutting of right-hand, left-hand, and double threads, 
and knurling on the lathe. Tools required: a four-inch scale or (B. & S.) 
slide caliper, a nine-inch combination set No. 7 graduation, one pair five- 
inch outside calipers, one pair five-inch inside calipers, one center drill, 
one center gauge (B. & S.), and one pair of three-inch dividers. 

6. — Machine Shop II. Shop work, four hours. Two credits. Pre- 
requisite: Machine Shop I. 

This course consists of progressive problems in turning and calipering, 
boring, reaming and taper turning and threading on the lathe, exercises in 
chucking, the use of forming tools, practice on key-seating machine. A 
spur gear is made on the milling machine. A study is also made of cut- 
ting edges and tool adjustments best suited to the different metals, to- 
gether with a study of cutting speeds and feeds. 

7. — Advanced Woodwork. Lecture, one hour; shop work, four hours. 
Three credits. For students in the course in architecture. 

This is a course in bench and machine work in making some of the 
more common building details, such as porch newels and rails, plain and 
fancy moldings, cornices, etc. 

8. — Machine Shop III. Lecture, one hour; shop work, four hours. 
Three credits. Prerequisite : Machine Shop II. 

This course takes up work on the turret lathe and boring mill. Practi- 
cal work is also given with jigs, templets, and a study made of the rapid 
production of duplicate parts, belts, lacings, and methods of belt connec- 
tions, compound and differential indexing, and the cutting of spiral gears 
on the milling machine. 

9. — Woodwork III-G. Lectures and recitations, two hours; shop work, 
eight hours. Six credits. Elective in the course in general science. 

A course is given in woodworking suitable for use in the upper gram- 
mar and high-school grades. Each student completes a set of exercises 
suitable for those grades. Models showing progressive steps are made for 
the purpose of illustrating the proper methods of procedure in working 
out the different exercises. A study is made of the selection and cost of 
the equipment and material used in this work. 

10. — Machine Shop IV. Lectures, one hour; shop work, six hours. 
Four credits. Prerequisite: Machine Shop III. 

The time of this course is devoted to the construction of complete 
machines and machine parts, from drawings and blue-prints. A study 
will be made of the different machine tools from assigned catalogue work, 
with regard to the economical and efficient production of different classes 
of product. 

11. — Woodwork IV-G. Lectures and recitations, one hour; shop work, 
four hours. Three credits. Elective in the course in general science. 
Prerequisite: Woodwork III-G. 



Division of Mechanic Arts 167 

This is a continuation of Woodwork III-G, with a study of cabinet 
construction best adapted to high-school grades. The work of this term 
includes a course in wood carving, in sinking backgrounds and in model- 
ing curved surfaces. The course includes a study of the proper applica- 
tion of carving in ornamental articles of use. 

12. — Wood Turning G. Lectures and recitations, one hour; shop work, 
four hours. Elective in the course in general science. Prerequisite: 
Woodwork III-G. 

Exercises are first given in turning cylinders, cones, convex and con- 
cave curves, which involve the use of different wood-turning tools. The 
course involves turning between centers, on faceplates, and by means of 
hollow chucks. Some of the articles made are tool handles, dumb-bells, 
towel rings, typical vase forms, cups, goblets, etc. Tools required: one 
two-foot rule, one pair of three-inch dividers, one pair of five-inch outside 
calipers, one pair of five-inch inside calipers. 

13. — Machine Shop V. Shop work, supplemented by lectures, four 
hours. Two credits. Prerequisite: Machine Shop IV. 

This course is a continuation of Machine Shop IV, with practice m 
the making of taps, reamers, twist drills, dies and tool-making work. 

14. — Machine Shop VI. Shop work, supplemented by lectures, four 
hours. Two credits. Prerequisite: Machine Shop V. 

This is a continuation of Machine Shop V, with practice in the grinding 
of reamers, and milling cutters, and general tool work. 

15. — Blacksmithing III-G. Lectures and recitations, one hour; shop 
work, four hours. Three credits. Elective in the course in general 
science. Prerequisite: Blacksmithing II. 

Special drill in forge work is given in order to impart skill in the 
different operations. Progressive steps of different exercises are worked 
out, in order to illustrate the method of their construction. 

16. — Blacksmithing IV-G. Lectures and recitations, one hour; shop 
work, two hours. Two credits. Elective in the course in general science. 
Prerequisite: Blacksmithing III-G. 

This comprises a study of ornamental forge work in designing and 
making articles such as jardiniere stands, andirons, hinges, escutcheons, 
etc. A portion of the time is devoted to hammered metal work. Prob- 
lems are worked out in copper and brass, which brings into use typical 
tools and operations in the handling of sheet metal. 

17. — Machine Shop III-G. Lectures and recitations, one hour; shop 
work, four hours. Three credits. Elective in the course in general 
science. Prerequisite: Machine Shop II. 

A course in machine-shop metal working, adapted to the conditions 
frequently found in high schools. A study is made of the selection of 
machines, tools, and general supplies; the proper arrangement of the 
shop, the location of shafting, and other shop problems. 

COURSES IN FACTORY ENGINEERING 

1. — Factory Engineering. Senior year. Winter term. Lectures and 
recitations, two hours. Two credits. 

This course considers the selection of a locality and site for shops and 
manufacturing establishments; the grouping and design of the buildings, 
including the study of slow-burning and fire-proof construction; systems 
of illumination; equipment for the different departments; the methods of 
handling the raw material, from the point of its receipt through the sev- 
eral departments to the completion of the finished product, with the least 
amount of doubling back; methods of manufacturing. Text, Kent's 
Mechanical Engineer's' Pocketbook. Prerequisites: Applied Mechan- 
ics III; Business Organization. 



198 Kansas State Agricultural College 

2. — Factory Design. Senior year. Spring term. Drafting-room 
work, four hours. Two credits. 

The knowledge gained in the shops and laboratories is applied Lo the 
design of a factory, shop or mill. Prerequisite: Factory Engineering. 



Steam and Gas Engineering 

Professor Potter 
Instructor Simmering 
Assistant Sanders 
Assistant Knapp 
Assistant 

The object of the instruction in this department is to give to the 
student the fundamental principles underlying the design, construction, 
selection, operation and testing of steam boilers, steam engines, and steam 
turbines; gas producers; gas and petroleum engines: compressed-air and 
refrigerating machinery; condensers and evaporators. These subjects 
are developed by thorough courses in engineering thermodynamics and in 
steam and gas engineering, and are followed in the fourth year by 
courses in power-plant engineering, in refrigeration, and in heating and 
ventilation. The classroom instruction of every course consists of lec- 
tures and recitations, which are paralleled by work in the drafting room 
and laboratory, and supplemented by numerous practical problems, trade 
catalogues, notes, and inspection trips requiring written reports. 

STEAM ENGINEERING LABORATORY 

In addition to the equipment installed especially for experimental pur- 
poses, all the heating, power, ventilating, and pumping equipment of the 
College subserves the further purpose of experimental work. 

There are available for boiler tests three 125-horsepower high- 
pressure fire-tube boilers equipped with under-feed, chain-grate, and 
sight-feed stokers; two high-pressure water-tube 250-horsepower boilers, 
one being equipped with a Roney stoker and the other for hand firing. 
Besides the five high-pressure boilers, there are eight low-pressure boilers 
equipped with under-feed stokers. All of these boilers have full equip- 
ment of auxiliaries and are provided with pyrometers, draft gauges, flue- 
gas samplers, and other instruments for research and laboratory work. 

The steam engineering laboratory contains eight steam engines with 
different types of valve gears, including plain slide valves, balanced 
valves, double valves, piston valves, Corliss valves. These engines range 
in power from six to two hundred and fifty horsepower. There is also 
a 300-horsepower De Laval steam turbine equipped with a surface 
condenser, dry vacuum pumps, wet vacuum pumps, and circulating 
pumps. A little compound reciprocating steam engine is also equipped 
so that it can be operated condensing or noncondensing. The engines in 
this laboratory are equipped with electric generators or with absorption 
brakes, the Corliss engine being provided with an Alden water brake. 

The laboratory is also provided with various types of steam pumps, 
steam traps, and coal calorimeters, indicators, gauges, injectors, planim- 
eters, pyrometers, and apparatus for testing gauges, indicators, and 
lubricants. Furthermore, the College has several types of steam traction 
engines and a road roller. 



Division of Mechanic Arts 199 

GAS ENGINEERING LABORATORY 

The apparatus for gas engineering' work includes two complete pro- 
ducer plants, with various types of scrubbers, saturators, blowers, a Car- 
penter coai calorimeter, a Junkers gas calorimeter, two types of 
pyrometers, and many different types of gas and oil engines, fans, a 
complete compressed-air plant, consisting of a steam engine, air com- 
pressors, and an air motor, Venturi and Pitot tubes, gas meters, and other 
small apparatus. 

The College owns a gasoline tractor, and, through the courtesy of 
manufacturers, has on hand at all times several types of gasoline and. oil 
traction engines. 

COURSES IN STEAM AND GAS ENGINEERING 

1. — Steam and Gas Engineering I. Fall term. Lectures and recita- 
tions, four hours. Four credits. Prerequisite: Kinematics I. 

A descriptive study of steam boilers, steam engines, and steam tur- 
bines. A study of the various types of fire-tube and water-tube boilers, 
reciprocating steam engines and turbines, valve gears, governors, and 
details of construction and operation. Texts: Peabody's Valve Gears; 
Peabody and Miller's Steam Boilers; Notes. 

2. — Steam and Gas Engineering II. Winter term. Lectures and 
recitations, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Prerequi- 
site: Steam and Gas Engineering I. 

This is a continuation of the work given under Steam and Gas Engi- 
neering I, as well as a descriptive study of gas and oil engines, and gas 
producers, including carbureters, vaporizers, ignition systems, gas- 
engine governors, etc. Texts: Peabody & Miller's Steam Boilers; Jones' 
Gas Engine, 

3. — Steam and .Gas Engineering III. Spring term. Lectures and 
recitations, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. * Prerequi- 
sites: Steam and Gas Engineering; Calculus III. 

A study of engineering thermodynamics, including the application of 
laws of gases and vapors to various thermodynamic cycles. Text, Ennis' 
Applied Thermodynamics for Engineers'. 

4. — Steam and Gas Engineering IV. Fall term. Lectures and reci- 
tations, three hours ; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Prerequisite : 
Steam and Gas Engineering III. 

A continuation of the work given in Steam and Gas Engineering III, 
including thermodynamic design of reciprocating steam engines, tur- 
bines, and internal-combustion motors, heat-engine economics and specifi- 
cations. Text, same as Steam and Gas Engineering III, and notes. 

5. — Steam and Gas Engineering V. Winter term. Lectures and reci- 
tations, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Prerequisite: 
Steam and Gas Engineering IV. 

The course includes a study of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels for use 
in internal-combustion engines; of methods of refining crude petroleum; 
of manufacture of water gas, producer gas, coal gas, oil gas, including 
various scrubbing systems and gas-plant auxiliaries; of thermodynamic 
and physical properties of various commercial gases. 

6. — Steam and Gas Engineering E-L Fall term. Lectures and reci- 
tations, four hours; laboratory, two hours. Five credits. Prerequisites: 
Kinematics; Calculus III. 



200 Kansas State Agricultural College 

This is a descriptive study of steam engines, boilers, and steam power- 
plant auxiliaries. The course includes a study of elementary thermo- 
dynamic principles of gases and vapors. Text, Allen & Bursley's Heat 
Engines. 

7. — Steam and Gas Engineering E-II. Winter term. Lectures and 
recitations, four hours; laboratory, two hours. Five credits. Prerequi- 
site: Steam and Gas Engineering E-I. 

Elementary thermodynamic principles applied to the study of the 
internal-combustion engine, and a descriptive study of gas engines, oil 
engines, and gas producers. Selection of prime movers for electric 
power plants, and the economics of the electric power-plant prime mover. 
Text, Jones* Gas Engines, 

8. — Steam and Gas Engineering C, Fall term. Lectures and recita- 
tions, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Prerequisites: 
Kinematics; Calculus III. 

A descriptive study of steam boilers, steam engines, steam turbines, 
and gas and oil engines, including the various auxiliaries. Text, Allen 
& Bursley's Heat Engines. 

. 9. — Farm Motors I. Winter term. Lectures and recitations, two 
hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. 

A descriptive study of steam engines, boilers, gas and oil engines, 
with special reference to their utilization on the farm. Text Potter's 
Farm Motors. 

10. — Farm Motors II. Lectures and recitations, two hours; labora- 
tory, two hours. Three credits. Prerequisite : Farm Motors I. 

A continuation of the study of farm motors, including water motors, 
windmills, electric motors, and traction engines. Text, Potter's Farm 
Motors. 

11. — Traction Engines. Lectures and recitations,, one hour; labora- 
tory, four hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Farm Motors II. 

A study is made of the details of construction, operation and testing 
of the various types of steam and oil traction engines. 

12. — Refrigeration. Spring term. Lectures and recitations, two 
hours; laboratory, two hours. Three credits. Prerequisite: Steam and 
Gas Engineering IV, or Steam and Gas Engineering E-II. 

This is a study of the practical details of compression and absorption 
refrigerating systems, including auxiliaries, refrigerating mediums, in- 
sulation, and applications of refrigeration to ice-making, cold storage, 
and the cooling of air, liquids, and solids. Text, Macintire's Refrigera- 
tion. 

13. — Power Plant Engineering. Winter term. Lectures and recita- 
tions, two hours. Two credits. Prerequisites: Steam and Gas Engineer- 
ing IV; Hydraulic Machinery. 

A study of complete power plants, including steam-electric, gas-electric, 
and hydro-electric power plants. In this course the knowledge obtained, 
through the study of the various prime movers and auxiliaries, is ap- 
plied to the complete power plant. Text: Meyers' Power Plants; and 
notes. 

14. — Power Plant Design. Drafting room work, four hours. Two 
credits. Prerequisite: Power Plant Engineering. 

A design of a complete power plant, including the location of prime 
movers and auxiliaries. In connection with this course the student makes 
a careful study of load conditions, location of plant, and other details. 



Division of Mechanic Arts 201 

15. — Heating and Ventilation. Spring term. Lectures and recita- 
tions, two hours; laboratory and drafting room work, two hours. Three 
credits. Prerequisite: Steam and Gas Engineering IY. 

This course is planned to acquaint the students with the fundamental 
principles of heating and ventilation, including direct and indirect 
systems, hot water, hot air, and steam systems of heating; advantages of 
various heating systems. In the designing room heat systems for dwel- 
ings, shops, power plants, and schools are considered. Text, Hoffman's 
Heating and Ventilation 

COURSES IN STEAM AND GAS ENGINEERING LABORATORY 
Text, Carpenter and Diederich's Experimental Engineering. 

1. — Steam and Gas Engineering II Laboratory. Winter term. Two 
hours a week. One credit. This must be taken in connection with Steam 
and Gas Engineering II. 

This course includes the study and testing of gauges, indicators, 
simple steam engines and steam engine auxiliaries. Valve setting and 
manipulation of steam engines. 

2.— Steam and Gas Engineering III Laboratory. Spring term. Two 
hours a week. One credit. This must be taken in connection with Steam 
and Gas Engineering III. 

Calibration and use of calorimeters, traps, injectors. Flue gas an- 
alysis, manipulation and testing of gas and oil engines are the studies of 
this course. Prerequisite: Steam and Gas Engineering II Laboratory. 

3. — Steam and Gas Engineering IV Laboratory. Fall term. Two 
* hours a week. One credit. This must be taken with Steam and Gas En- 
gineering IV. 

This course includes thermal analyses of solid, liquid and gaseous 
fuels ; engine and boiler room practice ; evaporation tests on boilers ; com- 
plete tests of steam engines and turbines; A. S. M. E. codes. Pre- 
requisite : Steam and Gas Engineering III Laboratory. 

4. — Steam and Gas Engineering V Laboratory. Winter term. Two 
hours a week. One credit. This must be taken with Steam and Gas En- 
gineering V. 

Complete tests are made on gas and oil engines, gas producers, water 
gas plants. Research work is done on explosive mixtures with various 
gas engine fuels. Air compressors, fans and blowers are also tested. 

5. — Steam and Gas Engineering E-I Laboratory. Fall term. Two 
hours. One credit. This is taken in connection with Steam and Gas 
Engineering E-I. 

This course includes the testing of indicators, gauges, steam engines; 
the use of steam calorimeters and steam meters; valve setting and 
manipulation of steam engines. 

6. — Steam and Gas Engineering E-II Laboratory. Winter term. 
Two hours. One credit. Taken in connection with Steam and Gas En- 
gineering E-II. 

The course comprises manipulation and testing of gas and oil engines; 
engine room and boiler room practice; evaporation tests of steam boilers, 
steam turbine tests. Prerequisite: Steam and Gas Engineering E-I 
Laboratory. 

7. — Steam and Gas Engineering C Laboratory. Fall term. Two 
hours. One credit. This is taken in connection with Steam and Gas En- 
gineering C. 

This course includes the handling of steam and gas engines; boiler 
and engine room practice; the use of steam calorimeters, indicators; 
simple tests on steam and gas engines. 



202 Kansas State Agricultural College 

8. — Farm Motors I Laboratory: Winter term. Four hours. Two 
credits. This is taken in connection with Farm Motors I. 

A study is made of the construction, manipulation and testing of va- 
rious types of farm motors, including steam engines and boilers, gas and 
oil engines, water motors, and windmills. 

9. — Farm Motors II Laboratory. Spring term. Two hours. One 
credit. Taken in connection with Farm Motors II. 

This is a continuation of the work given in Farm Motors I Laboratory, 
including the operation of electric motors and traction engines. Pre- 
requisite: Farm Motors I Laboratory. 

10. — Traction Engine Laboratory. Fall term. Four hours. Two 
credits. 

The course comprises the operation and testing of steam and oil 
traction engines for belt work, road work, and field work. Prerequisite: 
Farm Motors- II and laboratory. 

11. — Refrigeration Laboratory. Spring term. Two hours. One 
credit. This must be taken with Refrigeration. 

Part of the time is given to tests on refrigerating mediums and tests 
on refrigerating and ice making plants. The second half of the term is 
devoted to a design of a refrigerating plant. 

12. — Gas Engines. Elective. Fall, winter, or spring term. Lecture, 
one hour ; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. 

This course is designed to teach the operation, care and repair of 
small stationary gas and oil engines. 

SHORT COURSES IN MECHANIC ARTS 

The following short courses are intended for men who wish to gain 
a practical knowledge of the work indicated. Each of the courses is ten 
weeks long, and is offered in the winter term. 

SHORT COURSE IN STEAM AND GAS TRACTION ENGINES. 

This course is intended for those who have not the time or the means 
to take any of the regular technical engineering courses in the College, 
but who wish to obtain a practical working knowledge of stationary and 
traction steam and gas engines. The work of the course is shown in the 
following tabulation : 

Steam Engines, Boilers, and Steam Traction Engines 

8 (2-12) 
G-as Engines and Gas Traction Engines 

7 (1-12) 
Blacksmithing 

3 (1-4) 
Machine Shop Practice 

4 (0-8) 
Mechanical Drawing 

2 (0-4) 



Division of Mechanic Arts 203 

SHORT COURSE IN SHOP WORK 

This is a course designed for men who wish to gain a working knowl- 
edge of machines, tools, and methods which are used in the general re- 
pair shops. The subjects taught are shown below. 

Blacksmithing 

6 (2-8) 
Foundry 

3 (1-4) 

Machine Shop 
6 (0-12) 
Woodwork 

4 (0-8) 

Gas and Oil Engines 

3 (1-4) 
Mechanical Drawing 

2 (0-4) 

SHORT COURSE IN CEMENT CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION 

This course is designed for builders and others wishing to gain a 
general practical knowledge of concrete construction. The subjects con- 
sidered are as tabulated here. 

Concrete Construction 

9 (3-12) 
Concrete Materials and Tests 

4 (1-6) 
Concrete Drawing and Design 

3 (0-6) 
Form Construction and Framing 

3 (1-4) 
Gas Engines and Concrete Mixers 

3 (1-4) 
Mechanical Drawing 

2 (0-4) 

SHORT COURSE IN ROAD BUILDING, IRRIGATION AND 

DRAINAGE 

This course, a tabulation of which is shown below, is designed for 
county engineers and surveyors. 

Surveying 

3 (1-4) 
Highway Engineering 

3 (3-0) 
Irrigation and Dtrainage Engineering 

3 (3-0) 
Road Machinery and Materials Laboratory 

2 (0-4) 

Bridge and Culvert Construction 

6 (3-6) 
Concrete Construction 

3 (1-4) 
Specifications and Contracts, 
Road Laws and Administration 

2 (2-0) 

Mechanical Drawing 

2 (0-4) 



204 Kansas State Agricultural College 



SUBJECTS TAUGHT IN THE MECHANIC ARTS 
SHORT COURSES 

CONCRETE 

1.— Concrete Construction. «Class work, three hours; laboratory, 
twelve hours. 

Instruction in the selection of materials and proper proportions for 
different kinds of concrete construction, and in the essential principles 
of forming for, and of mixing and placing concrete. 

Laboratory work consists of practice in the making of a variety of 
concrete objects, as fence posts, building blocks and other molded speci- 
mens, of concrete sidewalks, floors, water tanks, machine foundations, 
of stucco and plastered work, etc. 

2. — Concrete Materials and Tests. Class work, one hour; labora- 
tory, six hours. 

A study of properties and tests of cement, sands, gravels and broken 
stone. Standard tests are made to determine the fineness, soundness and 
strength of cement, the percentage of voids and foreign matters in sand 
and stone and the effect of variation in these properties upon the strength 
of concrete. 

3. — Concrete Drawing and Design. Drafting room practice, six 
hours. 

Exercises in drawing designed to teach the student to read simple 
working drawings and to enable him to make such drawings of 
simple proposed constructions, especially of concrete. Practice in the use 
of rules and tables to determine the size of beams, slabs, and columns, 
and the amount of reinforcing required in reinforced concrete. 

STATIONARY AND TRACTION STEAM AND GAS ENGINES 

1. — Steam Engines, Boilers, and Steam Traction Engines. Class 
work, three hours; laboratory, twelve hours. 

A study of steam boilers and auxiliaries; types of boilers, grates for 
boilers, piping, pipe fittings, valves, putting in flues, steam gages, steam 
traps, pumps and injectors, firing, management of boilers. Stationary 
.steam engines; types of engines, valves and valve setting, engine auxil- 
iaries, installation, repairs and care of steam engines. Traction engines; 
fundamental parts, differentials, care and management of traction engines. 

2. — Gas Engines and Gas Traction Engines. Class work, two 
hours; laboratory, eight hours. 

A study of gas and oil engines; four-stroke, and two-stroke cycle en- 
gines, gas engine fuels, carbureters, ignition systems, selection, erection, 
.and care of gas engines; gas engine repairs. Gas Traction engines. 

3. — gas and Oil Engines. Class work, one hour; laboratory, four 
hours. 

A study of two-stroke and four-stroke cycle gas and oil engine; fuels; 
mechanical details. Selection and handling of gas and oil engines. 

SHOP WORK 

1. — Blacksmithing. (For Short Course in Shop Work.) Two hours 
of class work; eight hours of laboratory work a week. 

A course in the forging of iron and steel such as will give a general 
knowledge of the methods of working and handling these metals. The 
class work will consist of a study of the manufacture of cast iron, wrought 
iron, mild steel, and of the proper use and method of working each. 



Division of Mechanic Arts 205 

2. — Blacksmithing. (For Short Course in Traction Engines.) Class 
work one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. 

This is a course in iron and steel work designed to give the student a 
knowledge of the manufacture of iron and steel and the proper methods 
of handling it in the forge shop. Exercises are given in drawing, up- 
setting, bending, twisting, punching, welding in iron and machinery steel, 
and also exercises in forging, hardening and tempering tool steel, 

3. — Machine Shop. (For Short Course in Shop Work.) Shop work 
supplemented by lectures, sixteen hours a week. 

A course in machine work to give a good working knowledge of a 
variety of machine operations such as chipping, filing, scraping, drilling, 
shaper and planer work, lathe work in cutting various threads, key- 
seating, soldering, brazing, babbitting, lacing belts, aligning shafting and 
pulleys, cutting and threading pipe, and in making general repairs on a 
variety of machinery. 

4. — Machine Shop. (For Short Course in Traction Engines.) Labora- 
tory, eight hours. 

This course in machine work is to give the student practice in chip- 
ping, filing, drilling, babbitting and adjusting bearings, and in making 
general repairs to machinery; practice will also be given in cutting and 
fitting pipes, and in soldering and brazing, belt lacing, etc. 

5. — Foundry. Class work, one hour; laboratory, six hours. 

This course consists of bench and floor molding, with a great variety 
of patterns, along with which the student gets experience with different 
kinds of sand and facings; also, open sand work, sweep molds, and in- 
struction in machine molding, core making, setting of cores, gates and 
risers, and different methods of venting, etc. The lectures consist of 
practical talks on the materials used in the foundry, the selection of sand, 
methods of venting, drying and handling of molds, cores, etc., for the 
various classes of work; also discussions on the handling of the cupola, 
and the grading and mixing of the irons suitable for different classes of 
work. Special emphasis in all cases being laid upon the practical side 
of work. 

6. — Woodwork. Laboratory, eight hours. 

Elementary principles of carpentry, framing and cabinet work. 

7. — Form Construction and Framing. Class work, one hour; labora- 
tory, four hours. 

A study of the fundamental factors to be taken into consideration in 
the construction of buildings, as the building site, laying oiit and squaring 
the foundation, excavating, types of foundations, form building for con- 
crete, anchoring, placing of sills, joists, bridging, studding, bracing, rafter 
cutting and fitting. 

The laboratory work consists of exercises along the lines given above. 

MECHANICAL DRAWING 

Mechanical Drawing. Drafting-room pi*actice, four hours. 

An elementary course in mechanical drawing designed to teach students 
to read and interpret simple working drawings and to make working 
drawings of simple objects or designs. F Some attention is devoted to the 
use of the triangles, T-square, and drawing instruments, and to the 
principles of orthographic projection. 

ROAD BUILDING, IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE 

1. — Surveying. Sophomore year, fall and spring terms. Class work, 
one hour; field work, four hours. Three credits. 

This is a brief course in the care and use of engineers' surveying 
instruments. The greater part of the time is devoted ^o exercises and 
practical problems involving the use of the transit and level. 



206 Kansas State Agricultural College 

2. — Highway Engineering. Spring term. Class work, three hours. 
Three credits. 

The work in the class room is devoted to a study of the theory and 
practice of economic highway and pavement construction and mainte- 
nance, including a study of the needs of traffic, of its effect on the road 
surface, and of the materials of construction. 

3. — Irrigation and Drainage. Fall term. Class work, three hours. 
Three credits. 

In this course a study is made of the application of engineering 
principles to the design and construction of drainage and irrigation 
works. Considerable attention is paid to the development of ground 
water supplies for irrigation. Any senior engineering student may enter 
the course. 

4. — Bridge and Culvert Construction. Short course in Highways, 
Irrigation and Drainage. Three recitations; four hours in the drafting 
room. Five credits. 

This is an elementary course in the design and construction of highway 
bridges and culverts. 

5. — Specifications and Contracts, Road Laws and Administration. 
Class work, two hours. 

A brief treatment of the road laws and administration in the various 
parts of the United States and Europe, dealing with specifications for 
various types of highway construction and the fundamental considera- 
tions to be dealt with in the formation of contracts. 

6. — Road Machinery and Materials Laboratory. Laboratory prac- 
tice, four hours. 

A study of the use of various road building machines and the testing 
of various road materials. 

Mechanic Arts in the Summer School 

The College has been unable to supply from its regular graduates all 
of the teachers in manual training required by the high schools of the 
State, and in order to encourage the introduction of manual training and 
industrial drawing in all grades the College offers summer courses for 
teachers in manual training, agriculture, and domestic science. 

The work in drawing is an elementary course in free-hand and object 
drawing especially designed to assist teachers in the use of the state text 
in drawing. 

In manual training and shop practice several courses are offered, em- 
bracing different grades of work and different materials. One of these 
is for pupils in the primary grades, and includes weaving, cord work, 
raffia, reed work and cardboard construction. Other courses deal with 
woodworking for the grammar grades and for high schools. These in- 
clude not only a careful study of tools and processes, and practice in 
important exercises in joinery, but practical cabinet construction, wood 
turning, wood carving and inlaying, polishing and finishing. 

In metal work a course in forging includes practical exercises for 
high-school work, involving the operations of drawing, upsetting, welding, 
twisting, splitting and shaping.* Sufficient instruction is given in the 
forging of tool steel to enable one to make and temper many of the tools 
needed in high-school work. Another course includes bench work and 
machine-tool work, and familiarizes the student with some of the funda- 
mental operations of a modern machine shop. 

A special circular giving further details of this work may be had upon 
application to the President of the College. See, also, article in this 
catalogue on the Summer School. 



Division of Mechanic Arts 207 

Engineering Fellowships 

The Board has established two fellowships in engineering. Each fel- 
lowship is two years in duration. The holder is expected to devote 
eleven months of the year to the work laid out, and receives from the 
College $500 annually. 

To be eligible for appointment, the applicant must be a graduate of a 
technical course of a school or college of recognized standing. Prefer- 
ence will be given to those who have had some commercial experience 
along the lines of research to be followed. 

Applications for fellowships should be made to the dean of the Division 
of Mechanic Arts, and should state the lines of work that the applicant 
particularly desires to follow. 



208 Kansas State Agricultural College 



Division of Home Economics 

Mary Pierce Van Zile, Dean. 



The philosophy which long ruled our educational policy has 
been so modified by research in the sciences and by develop- 
ment of the industries, arts, and professions, that it is now 
recognized that any perfected educational system must include 
technical training. It must encourage the student's natural 
desire for productive work — work in which there is a living 
connection between theory and practice. These broader views 
have been accepted by college and university men, and the 
result is noted in the success attained by combining industrial, 
technical, and scientific work with the general studies. The 
result is evidenced in the new courses of study for our young 
men and women. It is safe to assume that there are now but 
few educators who are so conservative as not to be in sym- 
pathy with the collegiate education in home training which is 
furnished by courses in home economics. 

The courses are designed to fit young women to be home 
makers and capable women in whatever sphere their life work 
may be. The training is both specific and general. While it 
emphasizes primarily the practical and material side of life, it 
does not stop here. The young women are constantly reminded 
that life is not drudgery; that technical knowledge and sci- 
entific skill, even, fail to include the full meaning of education 
in its highest sense. They are taught that any training that 
fails to develop harmoniously body, mind, and spirit is inade- 
quate and incomplete. They are brought face to face with 
ideals as well as with actualities, and* are made to see that, 
while skillful labor gives dignity to life, grace, refinement, and 
self -poise are the highest requisites for true service. 

The training given is as Varied as it is broad. It includes a 
knowledge of the laws of health, an understanding of the sani- 
tary requirements of the home; the study of values, both abso- 
lute and relative, of the various articles (including food) that 
are used in the home; the wise expenditure of money, time, 
and energy; the scientific principles underlying the selection 
and preparation of food; the right care of children; and the 
ability to secure efficient service from others. Instruction is 
methodical and thorough, and is suited to the circumstances of 
the students. Experience shows that such training teaches 
contentment, industry, order, and cleanliness, and fosters a 
woman's independence and feeling of responsibility. 



Division of Home Economics 209 

The work in home economics includes : 
A four-year course, leading to degree of bachelor of science, 
A three-year course in the School of Agriculture. 
A six-months housekeepers' course, for which a certificate of 
proficiency is granted. 

COURSE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

The popularity of the four-year home economics course is 
evidenced by the fact that fully eighty-five per cent of the girls 
who graduate from the College graduate from this course. 
The training is both general and specific. Since scientific 
training is fundamental in the intelligent and successful ad- 
ministration of the home, strong courses in the sciences are 
given as a foundation for the special training in home eco- 
nomics. To the end that well-rounded culture may be at- 
tained, courses in English, history, economics, and psychology 
receive due prominence. The time of the student is about 
equally divided among the purely technical subjects, the fun- 
damental sciences, and the cultural studies. The courses in 
the related subjects are given in the different departments 
of the College, while the technical courses are given by the 
home economics departments. In the junior and senior years 
opportunity is given for choice of electives, which makes it 
possible for the student to specialize in some chosen line. To 
this end electives are to be chosen in groups combined logically 
in courses approved by the Faculty or by the student's dean. 

The four-year course is recommended for all who desire to 
teach domestic science or domestic art. It is with difficulty 
that the home economics training schools meet the demand for 
well-prepared teachers, a demand which is increasing more 
rapidly each year. The College does not assume the responsi- 
bility of insuring employment to graduates, but the latter 
rarely experience difficulty in obtaining remunerative posi- 
tions as instructors in domestic science or in domestic art, as 
dietitians, or as professional housekeepers. 



'210 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



Course in Home Economics 

The Arabic numeral immediately following the name of a subject indicates the number 
©f credits, while the numerals in parentheses indicate the number of hours a week of 
recitation and of laboratory, respectively. 



FALL 


WINTER 


SPRING 


English I 
4 (4-0) 


English II 
4 (4-0) 


College Rhetoric I 
. 4 (4-0) 


Chemistry I 
4 (3-2) 


Chemistry II 
4 (2-4) 


Chemistry III 
4 (3-2) 


Household Physics 
4 (4-0) 


Food Preparation 4 (2-4) or Textiles 
Home Problems 4 (3-2) 4 (2-4) 


•Object Drawing 
2 (0-4) 


Library Methods 
2 (1-2) 


Color and Design I 
2 (0-4) 


Domestic Art I 
2 (0-4) 


Domestic Art II 
2 (0-4) 


Domestic Art III 
2 (0-4) 


Physical Training 


Physical Training 

SOPHOMORE 


Physical Training 


-Qualitative Analysis 
4 (2-4) 


Elementary Organic Chem- 
istry 4 (4-0) 


Human Physiology 
4 (4-0) 


General Zoology I 
4 (2-4) 


General Zoology II 
4 (2-4) 


Embryology 
4 (2-4) 


Elementary German I 
4 (4-0) 


Elementary German II 
4 (4-0) 


German Readings 
4 (4-0) 


■Costume Design 
4 (0-8) 


Drafting and Pattern 
Making 2 (0-4) 


Dressmaking 
2 (0-4) 




Geometrical Dirawing 
2 (0-4) 


Working Drawings 
2 (0-4) 


Physical Training or 
Music 


Physical Training or 
Music 

JUNIOR 


Physical Training or 
Music 


■College Rhetoric II 
4 (4-0) 


English Literature I 
4 (4-0) 


English Literature II 
4 (4-0) 


Human Nutrition 
4 (4-0) 


Food and Nutrition I 
6 (3-6) 


Food and Nutrition II 
4 (2-4) 


Household Microbiology I 
4 (2-4) 


Household Microbiology II 
4 (2-4) 


Home Sanitation 
4 (4-0) 


Advanced Dressmaking 
2 (0-4) 




Home Architecture 
2 (0-4) 


"Elective or Psychology 
4 (4-0) 


Elective 

4( - ) 

SENIOR 


Elective 

4( - ) 


Household Chemistry 
4 (1-6) 


Household Entomology 
2 (2-0) 


History of Costume 
2 (2-0) 


American Government 
4 (4-0) 


American History I 
4 (4-0) 


Economics 
4 (4-0) 


Dietetics 

4 (2-4) 


Home Nursing 
3 (3-0) 


Psychology or Elective 
4 (4-0) 


Kitchen Gardening 
2 (2-0) 


Therapeutic Cookery 
3 (1-4) 


Ornamental Gardening 
2 (2-0) 




Marketing and Serving 
2 (0-4) 


Home Decoration 
2 (0-4) 


"Elective 

4( - ) 


Elective 

4( - ) 


Elective 

4( - ) 



Division of Home Economics 



211 



Electives— Course in Home Economics. 



FALL 


WINTER 


SPRING 


Institutional Management 
4 (4-0) 


Household Administration 
4 (4-0) 


Bread Making 
4 (2-4) 


Home Economics Education 
5 (3-4) 


Care of the Child 
4 (4-0) 


Fanev Cookery 
2 (0-4) 


Tailoring 
4 (0-8) 


Millinery 
4 (0-8) 


Fine Needlework 

4 (0-8) 
Art Needlework 

2 (0-4) 


Inorganic Chemistry I 
5 (3-4) 


Inorganic Chemistry II 
5 (3-4) 


Inorganic Chemistry III 
5 (3-4) 


Organic Chemistry I 
• 5 (3-4) 


Organic Chemistry II 
5 (3-4) 


Organic Chemistry III 
5 (3-4) 


Physiological Chemistry I 
4 (2-4) 


Physiological Chemistry 11 
4 (2-4) 


Physiological Chemistry III 
4 (2-4) 


German Comedies 
4 (4-0) 


German Prose I 
4 (4-0) 


German Prose II or 
Teachers' German 4 (4-0) 


Advanced Zoology I 
4 (2-4) 


Advanced Zoology II 
4 (2-4) 


Advanced Zoology III 
4 (2-4) 


Parasitology 
3 (2-2) 


Evolution of Domestic 
Animals 2 (2-0) 

Home Dairying 

2 (2-4) Vz term 

Home Poultrying 
2 (4-0) Vz term 


General Zoology Technique 

4 (1-6) or 
Economic Zoology 

4 (2-4) 


Study of Oratory 
4 (4-0) 


The English Drama 
4 (4-0) or 


American Literature 
4 (4-0) or 




The English Novel 
4 (4-0) 


Nineteenth Century Lit- 
erature 4 (4-0) 


Bible English 
4 (4-0) 


Farm and Home English 
4 (4-0) 


Business English 
4 (4-0) 


Farm Advertising 
3 (3-0) 


Farm Stories 
3 (3-0) 


Farm Bulletins 

3 (3-0) 
Applications 

1 (i-o) 


English History 
4 (4-0) 


French History 
4 (4-0) 


Modern Europe 
, 4 (4-0) or 
American History II 
4 (4-0) 


Sociology 
4 (4-0) 


Business Organization 
2 (2-0) 


Money and Banking 
2 (2-0) 




"Wage Problems 
2 (2-0) 


Public Finance 
2 (2-0) 


Educational Psychology 
4 (4-0) 


History of Education 
4 (4-0) 


Principles of Education 
4 (4-0) 



School Administration and 
School Law 4 (4-0) 

Note. — Students intending to teach should elect the educational subjects listed above. 



212 Kansas State Agricultural College 



Domestic Art 

Professor Birdsall 
Instructor Cowles 
Assistant Fewell 
Assistant Fecht 
Assistant Jones 
Assistant Thomas 
Assistant Ferree 
Assistant Buxton 
Assistant Ulrich 

The object of the instruction in domestic art is to give young women 
a practical knowledge of the selection of materials ; the growing of textile 
fibers, and the processes used in their manufacture into fabrics. The 
course also offers instruction in hand and machine sewing; principles of 
drafting and designing patterns; dressmaking, tailoring, millinery, cos- 
tume design, history of costume and textiles. The student furnishes all 
her materials. 

1. — Domestic Art I. Freshman year, fall term. Laboratory, four 
hours. Two credits. Required in the course in home economics; elective 
in the course in general science. 

This course includes practice in hand sewing, fundamental stitches 
being applied to simple articles; patching and darning; use of the sewing 
machine ; making corset cover. 

2. — Domestic Art II. Freshman year, winter term. Laboratory, four 
hours. Two credits. Required in the course in home economics; elective 
in the course in general science. Prerequisite: Domestic Art I. 

This course continues the work of Domestic Art I. The appropriate 
materials and trimmings for undergarments are discussed; use of sewing 
machine and attachments; pattern drafting; cutting and making drawers 
and skirt. 

3. — Domestic Art III. Freshman year, spring term. Laboratory, 
four hours. Two credits. Required in the course in home economics; 
elective in the course In general science. Prerequisite: Domestic Art II. 

This course instructs in a simple system of pattern drafting with the 
use of tapeline and square; making shirt waist and skirt. Materials 
used may be of cotton or linen. 

4. — Textiles. Freshman year, spring term. Class work, two hours; 
laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Required in the course in home 
economics. Prerequisite: Chemistry I and II. 

This course considers the primitive forms of textile industries and 
their development; the present method of spinning and weaving; classi- 
fication; manufacture and finish of all important fibers. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work considers the identification of fibers 
and substitute materials by means of the microscope; chemical tests to 
determine adulteration and admixtures of cloth; identifying materials, 
names, prices, widths, variation of weaves ; cleaning, laundering and dye- 
ing ; weaving rag rug. 

5. — Costume Design. Sophomore year, fall term. Laboratory, eight 
hours. Four credits. Required in the course in home economics ; elective 
in the course in general science. 

This course includes a study of the principles of design, color harmony, 
and the application of art in dress; original ' problems and their direct 
application to designs for textiles, embroideries, and costumes; sketching 
of costumes in pencil and water color; costumes for reproduction in ma- 
terials in direct relation to dressmaking. 



Division of Home Economics 213 

6. — Drafting and Pattern Making. Sophomore year, winter term. 
Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. Required in the course in home 
economics ; elective in the course in general science. 

This course gives practice in taking measures, drafting and designing 
patterns. All foundation patterns are drafted to measure and fitted; 
designs are draped on the form without patterns, using cheesecloth and 
other suitable inexpensive materials. 

7. — Dressmaking. Sophomore year, spring term. Laboratory, four 
hours. Two credits. Prerequisites : Costume Design ; Drafting and Pat- 
tern Making. 

This course includes practice in adapting patterns in making a cloth 
dress and a fancy waist. 

8. — Advanced Dressmaking. Junior year, fall term. Laboratory, 
four hours. Two credits. Required in the course in home economics. 
Prerequisite : Dressmaking. 

This course emphasizes the artistic side of line and decoration in dress ; 
presents the use of commercial patterns; includes practice in cutting, 
fitting, finishing and the draping of such materials as silks, satins, 
chiffons, and laces. 

9. — History of Costume. Senior year, spring term. Class work, two 
hours. Two credits. Required in the course in home economics. 

This course includes a survey of ancient Egyptian, Grecian, Roman, 
early and modern French costumes. Its aim is to give the student infor- 
mation regarding these different periods; comparisons are held regarding 
the adaptation to present fashions. 

10. — Art Needlework. Junior year, spring term. Laboratory, four 
hours. Two credits. Elective in the course in home economics. 

This course includes the following: stitches in crochet, knitting, cross- 
stitch, French embroidery, Roman cut work; their application to under- 
garments, waists, collars, and household linens. 

11. — Fine Needlework. Senior year, spring term. Laboratory, eight 
hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in home economics. 

This course is designed to give instruction in needlework applied to 
hand made garments, which includes a lingerie waist, children's and in- 
fants' clothing. 

12. — Tailoring. Senior year, fall term. Laboratory, eight hours. 
Four credits. Elective in the course in home economics. Prerequisite: 
Domestic Art 8. 

This course includes discussions of materials suitable for tailored 
suits; sponging, cutting, fitting and finishing a coat and skirt. 

13. — Millinery. Senior year, winter term. Laboratory, eight hours. 
Four credits. Elective in the course in home economics. 

This course includes practical and artistic principles of millinery; 
preparing various materials for trimmings; practice in making bows, 
rosettes, and other forms of hat decoration; making wire and buckram 
frames; use of velvet, silk and straw; renovating, and use of old ma- 
terials. 



214 Kansas State Agricultural College 



Domestic Science 

Professor Tan Zile 

Associate Professor Dow, in Charge 

Instructor Caton 

Instructor Ford 

Instructor Rigney 

Instructor Meade 

Assistant Williams 

Assistant G-keen 

Assistant Cox 

Assistant Skinner 

Assistant Davis 

Assistant Haekeb 

Technically, domestic science is an application of the science of bacte- 
riology to the study of home sanitation and hygiene; of physiology and 
chemistry to the composition of foods and their effect upon the human 
body; of physics as applied to heating and lighting. Since the home is 
dependent upon the sciences of chemistry, physiology, and bacteriology, 
and the application of these to hygiene, direct use of the principles of 
these sciences is made in the lessons in cookery, dietetics, home nursing, 
and household management. In the kitchen laboratory a standard system 
of measurement is taught, and constant emphasis is laid upon neatness, 
accuracy, and economy in the handling of materials and utensils. Science, 
applied science, and practice are presented in their proper relations, so 
that the student who completes these courses gains not only a theoretical 
knowledge of the principles underlying the profession of home making, 
but experience in applying them. 

1. — Food Preparation. Freshman year, winter term. Class work, 
two hours ; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Required in the course 
in home economics for students who have not had a course in foods in 
high school. Elective for young women in the courses in general science 
and industrial journalism. 

Foods are classified, according to similarities in their composition, into 
groups representative of the five food types — carbohydrates, fats, pro- 
teins, mineral matter, and water; their sources, composition and digestive 
value are considered. The conditions under which food materials are 
matured and marketed, and the problems which relate to their storage 
and transportation are also considered. 

Laboratory. — Principles underlying the cookery of food are illustrated 
in the preparation of representative foods. 

2. — Home Problems. Freshman year, winter term. Class work, three 
hours; laboratory, five hours. Four credits. Required in the course in 
home economics, as a substitute for Food Preparation, for students who 
have studied foods in high school; elective for students in the courses in 
general science and industrial journalism. 

This course includes a study of the history of the development of 
woman's place and work in the home and of the training for that work 
that is being given in educational institutions. Special problems of a 
week's work in the home are studied. 

Laboratory. — Principles underlying methods of doing the work of the 
household are illustrated by demonstration and experimental work with 
foods, cleaning agents, etc. 

3. — Food and Nutrition I. Junior year, winter or spring term. Class 
work, three hours; laboratory, six hours. Six credits. Required in the 
course in home economics; elective for young women in the courses in 



Division of Home Economics 215 

general science and industrial journalism. Prerequisite: Human Nutri- 
tion; Microbiology I. 

This course comprises a study of food and its relation to the body, to 
the composition of the body, and to the daily income of nutrients required 
and the output of waste. Carbohydrates are considered as to their classi- 
fication, composition, occurrence, and general properties, which matters 
are followed by a study of typical carbohydrate foods. Pats and proteins 
are studied in the same manner. Food values and costs are emphasized 
throughout the course. Lectures are given and reference work is re- 
quired. 

Laboratory. — Experimental cookery. This is an experimental study 
of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, the knowledge thus gained being 
then applied to the preparation of foods. 

4. — Food and Nutrition II. Junior year, spring term. Class work, 
two hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Required in the course 
in home economics; elective for young women in the courses in general 
science and industrial journalism. Prerequisite: Food and Nutrition I. 

This course is a continuation of the course in Food and Nutrition I. 
Leavening agents, flour mixtures, fruit and vegetable preservation are the 
subjects studied. 

Laboratory. — Experimental cookery continued, studying the problems 
connected with the use of the various leavening agents and the preserva- 
tion of fruits and vegetables. 

5. — Dietetics. Senior year, fall term. Class work, two hours; labora- 
tory four hours.. Four credits. Required in the course in home eco- 
nomics. Prerequisite: Food and Nutrition I and II. 

This course is an application of principles of human nutrition, as 
applied to the feeding of individuals, underlying physiological, economic, 
and social conditions, and a study of dietary standards. Lectures are 
given and reference work is required. 

Laboratory. — A practical comparison is made of the nutritive values of 
the common foods by computing, preparing and serving dietaries of 
specific costs in which specified nutrients are furnished. 

6. — Therapeutic Cookery. Senior year, winter term. Class work, 
one hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Required in the course 
in home economics. Prerequisite: Dietetics. 

This course comprises a study of diet in relation to disease. 

Laboratory, — Practice in the preparation and serving of food suitable 
for the sick. 

7. — Marketing and Serving. Senior year, winter term. Laboratory, 
four hours. Two credits. Required in the course in home economics; 
elective for young women in the courses in general science and industrial 
journalism. Prerequisite : Dietetics. 

This course gives an opportunity for practice in home cookery. It 
includes the planning, preparation and serving of meals based upon 
dietetic and economic standards. 

8. — Home Sanitation. Junior year, spring term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Required in the course in home economics. 

This course includes a study of the conditions which determine the 
healthfulness of the house, and the application of principles of sanitation 
to its care. Sanitary construction, ventilation, heating, lighting and 
plumbing of the house are considered. Lectures are given and reference 
work is required. Prerequisite: Working Drawings. 

9. — Institutional Management. Senior year, spring term. Class 
work, four hours. Four credits. Elective in the courses in home eco- 
nomics, general science and industrial journalism. 



216 Kansas State Agricultural College 

This course includes the study of the various types of institutions, 
their aim, support, control, needs, equipment and methods of purchasing' 
supplies, together with the study of the essential characteristics, prepara- 
tion and duties of the manager. Lectures are given followed by discus- 
sions. Reference and observation work required. 

10. — Household Administration. Senior year, winter term. Class 
work, four hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in home economics. 

The purpose is to secure an intelligent judgment regarding the general 
management of the home. The place of the home and the homemaker in 
the economic world, the organization of the household, the value and cost 
of house furnishings and their care, the apportionment and judicious ex- 
penditure oi the income, the method of keeping accounts, and the general 
cost of living, are the subjects studied. Lectures are given and reference 
work is required. 

11. — Bread Making. Senior year, spring term. Class work, two 
hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in 
home economics. Prerequisite: Food and Nutrition I. 

This course includes a microscopic study of yeasts, a careful considera- 
tion of milling methods, visits to mills, and an investigation of all the 
conditions .that may affect the quality of bread. Many methods are fol- 
lowed in the preparation of bread, and comparisons are made of the 
various methods. 

12. — Care of the Child. Senior year, spring term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in home economics. Pre- 
requisites: Physiology and Psychology. 

A study of the rational care of the child from infancy to adolescence. 
It includes the daily routine of the infant, bath, food, clothing, and rest, 
and the factors that influence habit formation and mental development. 

13. — Fancy Cookery. Senior year, spring term. Laboratory, four 
hours. Two credits. Elective in course in home economics. Prerequi- 
sites: Food and Nutrition I and II. 

This course applies the principles taught in Food and Nutrition I 
and II to fancy dishes which give practice and to further develop skill 
in manipulation. 



Home Economics Education 

Associate Professor Dow 
Assistant Jones 

1. — Home Economics Education. Senior year, fall term. Class work, 
three hours; laboratory, four hours. Five credits. Elective in the course 
in home economics. Prerequisites: Food and Nutrition I and II. 

This is a study of methods of preparation on the part of the teachers 
for the class exercises, the mode of conducting it, the making of lesson 
and course outlines, and the arrangement and equipment of laboratories, 
together with the cost of equipment and supplies. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work consists of observation, demonstra- 
tion, and practice teaching. 



Division of Home Economics 217 

Housekeepers' Course in Home Economics 



There are large numbers of young women who, from lack of time, are 
unable to take an extended course, but who recognize the need for special 
training in home making. The twentieth century demands of home man- 
agers an understanding of the sanitary requirements of the home, a 
knowledge of values, absolute and relative, of the articles used in the 
house, quick attention to details, good judgment in buying and a ready 
adaptation of means to the end in view. The purpose of the housekeepers'- 
•course is to furnish this training. The teaching in this course is no less 
accurate than in the regular course, but is necessarily different. Given to 
students without scientific training, the instruction must be more largely 
a presentation of facts, without an elaboration of the underlying prin- 
ciples. The work is intensely practical, and the hundreds of young women 
who take this course go back to their homes with a broader view of life, 
,and a knowledge and training that will enable them to meet their 
responsibilities. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Young women between the ages of eighteen and twenty-one are 
.admitted upon presentation of common-school diploma, grammar-school 
certificate, or high-school diploma, or upon passing an examination in 
the following subjects: reading, writing, spelling, arithmetic, grammar, 
geography, -physiology, and United States history. Young women over 
twenty-one are admitted without examination. 

HOUSEKEEPERS' COURSE 

The Arabic numeral immediately following the name of a subject indicates the number 
-of credits, while the numerals in parentheses indicate the number of hours a week of 
recitation and of laboratory, respectively. 

FALL WINTER 

Cookery I Cookery II 

4Y 2 (0-9) 6 (0-12) 

Sewing Home Nursing 

4% (0-9) 2 (2-0) 

Color and Design Dressmaking 

3 (0-6) 4 (0-8) 

Hygiene Floriculture 

1 (1-0) 2 (2-0) 

Note.—- Young women registered in the Housekeepers' Course may during the fall term 
•elect one additional subject selected from the college courses or from the courses in the 
School of Agriculture. Before being assigned to such subject the student must present 
satisfactory evidence that she is qualified to carry such work successfully. 

SUBJECTS TAUGHT IN HOUSEKEEPERS' COURSE 

Cookery I. Fall term, nine hours. 

A laboratory course. Stoves, stove construction, stove management, 
-and fuels are the first topics considered, and are followed by experiments 
illustrating the effect of heat upon starch and proteids. The necessary 
-elementary principles involved are then applied to the cooking of cereals, 
•vegetables, beverages, breads, meats, soups, and simple cake mixtures and 
puddings. 



218 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Sewing. Fall term. Laboratory, nine hours. 

This course covers a full course in hand sewing; practice in the funda- 
mental stitches being applied to simple articles, consisting of a bag, towel, 
patching, and darning, etc. The appropriate materials and trimmings 
for undergarments are discussed; sewing machine problems and their 
attachments; pattern drafting; cutting and making corset cover, drawers, 
underskirt, and shirt-waist suit. 

Materials used may be of cotton or linen. The student furnishes all 
her materials. 

Color and Design. Fall term, six hours. 

A laboratory course in simple designing and in studying color rela- 
tions, with special reference to problems in the home. 

Cookery II. Winter term, twelve hours. 
• A laboratory course. The work of the term is divided into three 
parts. Four weeks are given to the planning and serving of meals; 
four weeks to the study of diet in relation to disease, with the prepara- 
tion of suitable food; and four weeks to canning, preserving, and the 
making of salads, cakes, pastries, and desserts. 

Home Nursing. Winter term, two hours. 

This course includes the study of the sick room and its care and 
furnishing, and the duties of the home nurse in giving intelligent assist- 
ance to the physician, and in contributing to the comfort of the sick. 
This involves also the ability to recognize and report symptoms correctly; 
to relieve pain; to give baths; to change bedding; to disinfect; and to 
treat wounds, burns, and sprains, as well as to meet successfully other 
emergencies that may arise in the home. 

Dressmaking. Winter term. Laboratory, eight hours. 

This course includes practice in the following: Adaptation of pat- 
terns, cutting, fitting, and making a cloth dress and fancy waist. The 
student furnishes all her materials. 

Floriculture. Winter term. Class work, two hours. 

Lectures in the classroom are supplemented by practical exercises in 
the greenhouse, dealing with the propagation and culture of flowers. 
Soil requirements, the planting of seeds, transplanting, cultivation, the 
making of cuttings, the selection of varieties adapted to the purposes of 
window gardening, lawn planting and cutting, are discussed in the lec- 
tures. An opportunity to become acquainted with the species recom- 
mended, and with the operations necessary for their successful culture, 
is afforded in the laboratory practice. 

Hygiene. Fall term. One hour. 

This is a lecture course covering the subjects that have a direct bearing 
#upon the health of a young woman student. 

HOME ECONOMICS IN THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

In addition to instruction in various branches of home economics 
available to many teachers in the spring term, the College offers several 
courses in this subject during the summer session. Instruction in these 
courses is intended to represent correctly that which may be introduced 
successfully into graded schools and high schools. Students will be 
enrolled upon presentation of a teacher's certificate, or of a certified 
statement showing that two years' high-school work or its equivalent 
has been completed. 



Division of Home Economics 219 

The general subject of the presentation of home economics is one of 
the courses offered. Here attention is given to the application of the 
general principles of teaching to the teaching of domestic science and 
domestic art, to the planning of lesson and course outlines, and to the 
equipment of laboratories for grade schools and high schools. 

In the courses in domestic science the preparation of food is discussed 
in its different phases, and the principles studied in the classroom are 
amply illustrated in the laboratory demonstrations. 

In the courses in domestic art, the theory of hand and machine sew- 
ing, making shirt-waist suits, and drafting and designing are taught and 
given ample laboratory demonstration. 

A special circular giving in detail the courses offered in the Summer 
School may be had by applying to the President of the College. See, 
also, the article on Summer School in this catalogue. 



220 Kansas State Agricultural College 



Division of General Science 

Julius * Terrass Willard, Dean. 



In the class of colleges to which this institution belongs, the 
classical studies of the older type of college are replaced by 
work in the sciences and in vocational subjects. A sound basis 
for technical training includes thorough training in mathe- 
matics, physical science, and biological science. It is believed 
also that education should include some preparation for the 
discharge of one's duties to the State and to the community in 
which he lives. It should afford him that discipline and cul- 
ture which alone can give him a grasp of the relations among 
things, a breadth of view, a tolerant attitude, and hence an 
influence over his associates and fellow citizens of every sta- 
tion in life. 

It is the province of the departments grouped in this divi- 
sion of the College to give this basal scientific, cultural, and 
disciplinary training. Their work is not only foundational, 
but it penetrates through all the characteristic vocational 
courses of the institution, as the structural steel of the modern 
skyscraper penetrates the entire building and forms a secure 
framework and support for the parts more readily visible. 
These departments thus give unity to all of the four-year 
courses of study, although presenting but two courses that 
are distinctive of their own work. These, however, by means 
of electives and options, are susceptible of manifold modifica- 
tion and application. 

THE COURSE IN GENERAL SCIENCE 

The course in general science is the lineal descendent of the 
single course formerly offered here. It includes the funda- 
mental training in English, mathematics, science, history, eco- 
nomics, military drill, and physical culture required in the 
several specialized vocational courses now offered by the Col- 
lege and chosen by the great body of our students. Its re- 
quired subjects constitute the central educational basis of the 
institution. By means of a number of groups of electives, it 
gives an opportunity to students to advance themselves still 
further in these fundamental lines and to give special at- 
tention to some instead of taking the vocational subjects 
characterizing other courses. This opportunity meets the needs 
of several types of young people, among whom are: (1) Those 
who have not yet fully decided as to their vocation, but who 
wish an education that is strong and well balanced in respect 



Division of General Science 221 

to modern science and cultural subjects, as a foundation for 
further education or as a preparation for sound citizenship 
and intellectual satisfaction in life. (2) Those who are look- 
ing forward to teaching in the high schools of the State. The 
electives offered allow one to give special attention to mathe- 
matics, physical science, biological science, elementary agri- 
culture, elementary domestic science and art, history, eco- 
nomics, English, and professional educational subjects. (3) 
Those who are fitting themselves for research work in the 
sciences, especially as applied to agriculture, engineering, and 
other industries. 

The elective groups offered in this course are to a consid- 
erable extent made up of studies required in one or more of 
the specialized courses. They provide also, however, advanced 
work not included in other courses. The scientific work in con- 
nection with the Agricultural and Engineering Experiment 
Stations, and several fields of State investigation and service, 
calls for the operation of unusually well-equipped departments 
in the sciences, and excellent facilities for practical training 
in this work are thus afforded. 

While the course in general science offers a wide choice of 
electives, these may not be selected aimlessly, or with the idea 
of choosing the easiest, or of obtaining credit for miscellane- 
ous subjects taken elsewhere or in other courses. The studies 
of the freshman and sophomore years are basal and are re- 
quired of all, without exception. They insure a broad and 
adequate foundation for subsequent work in the several lines 
of electives. The electives are to be chosen in groups, com- 
bined logically in courses approved by the Faculty or by the 
dean of the Division of General Science. Students changing 
from other courses to the course in general science receive 
credit for work done in tjie other courses in so far as it may be 
fitted into the general plan of this one. 

The course in general science in the junior and senior years 
requires of all students civics, American history, economics, 
psychology, and philosophy. This gives opportunity for the 
election of twenty-two or more additional studies. Not fewer 
than ninety credit units are to be chosen in groups, in such a 
manner as to give logical coherence to the course as a whole. 
The elective portion of the course, as thus made up, will con- 
sist for the most part of several groups of three or more full 
studies or their equivalent. It is possible to include some 
single subjects that may be advantageously taken without 
others. For a few courses special combinations in sewing, 
cooking, and shop work have been planned to meet the needs of 
prospective teachers of manual training. 

The course in general science is thus many in one. Such 
various combinations of groups are possible that it is not 
practicable to print all of them in extended form. There are, 



222 Kansas State Agricultural College 

therefore, formally presented herewith the required subjects 
of the course in their specified order by years and terms, to- 
gether with a considerable number of groups of electives. 

Finally, combinations of these groups that have been ap- 
proved are indicated by means of numbers assigned to the 
several groups. Other combinations may be arranged. 

THE COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL JOURNALISM 

Knowledge is power only as it comes into the possession of 
those who can use it ; it gives pleasure in direct proportion to 
the extent of its diffusion. A discovery is of but little value as 
long as the discoverer is the only one who knows of its exist- 
ence, and the printed page is by far the most effective means 
of extending knowledge concerning it. Magazines and news- 
papers never sleep, nor do they take vacations, and their 
power to elevate mankind is incalculable. But printed knowl- 
edge becomes effective only as it is read, and to be read in this 
day it must stand out from the great mass of other matter, 
and gain the attention and hold the interest of the reader. To 
do this, its points must be sharp and easily seen, and the style 
must be attractive. On the other hand, if the presentation is 
not essentially true, the more attractive it is the worse it is, 
and the greater the harm that follows wide reading of it. 

The purpose of the course in industrial journalism is to 
equip men and women with fundamental knowledge, that they 
may both recognize that which is new, and distinguish truth 
from falsehood ; to enable them to set a proper valuation upon 
facts as related to the industrial world, that the emphasis of 
their writings may be properly placed; and to write clear, 
accurate, forceful, entertaining English. 

A writer might advantageously know everything; this being 
impossible and the field being so broad, this course as offered 
by the College includes, in the first place, studies that are 
basic to all industrial life and its presentation — English, his- 
tory, economics, physics, chemistry, the biological sciences, 
etc., and two years in the theory and practice of effective 
writing and publication. In the second place, this course 
gives opportunity for choice of elective groups of subjects 
directed towards agriculture, mechanic arts, home economics, 
or general science. Thus, a student may elect subjects that 
will give special knowledge concerning farm crops, live stock, 
horticulture, forestry, mechanic arts, home economics, etc. 

The College thus affords preparation for work in a wide 
and inviting field. Our unprecedented industrial achievements 
have been made by the application of discoveries in physical 
and biological science. Much of discovery, and much of appli- 
cation, is yet to come, and one who can write truthfuly and 
attractively of that which is, and of that which comes, will 
find ample reward. 



Division of General Science 



223: 



Course in General Science 

The Arabic numeral immediately following the name of a subject indicates the number 
of credits, while the numerals in parentheses indicate the number of hours a week of 
recitation and of laboratory, respectively. 



FALL 

English I 

4 (4-0) 
Chemistry I 

4 (3-2) 
Plane Trigonometry 

4 (4-0) 
General Zoology I 

4 (2-4) 
Library Methods 

2 (1-2) 



FRESHMAN 

WINTER 

English II 

4 (4-0) 
Chemistry II 

' 4 (2-4) 
College Algebra 

4 (4-0) 
General Zoology II 

4 (2-4) 
Object Drawing 

2 (0-4) 



SPRING 

College Rhetoric I 

4 (4-0) 
Chemistry III 

4 (3-2) 
Public Speaking 

4 (4-0) 
Embryology 

4 (2-4) 
Geometrical Drawing 

2 (0-4) 



Military Drill* or 
Physical Trainingf 


Military Drill* or 
Physical Trainingf 

SOPHOMORE 


Military Drill* or 
Physical Trainingf 


College Rhetoric II 
4 (4-0) 


English Literature I, or 
English Literature! 
4 (4-0) 


English Literature II, or 
Analytical Geometry}: 
4 (4-0) 


General Physics I 
4 (3-2) 


General Physics II 
4 (3-2) 


General Physics III 
4 (3-2) 


Qualitative Analysis 
4 (2-4) 


El. Organic Chemistry 
4 (4-0) 


Advanced English History 
4 (4-0) 


General Botany 
5 (3-4) 


Plant Anatomy 
5 (3-4) 


Plant Physiology 
4 (2-4) 

Elective 

2 ( - ) 


Military Drill* or 
Physical Trainingf 


Military Drill* or 
Physical Trainingf 

JUNIOR 


Military Drill* or 
Physical Trainingf 


Psychology 
4 (4-0) 


Economics 
4 (4-0) 


American Government 
4 (4-0) 


Electives§ 

14( - ) 


Electives! 

14 ( - ) 

SENIOR 


Electives § 

14 ( - ) 


American History I 
4 (4-0) 


Philosophy 

4 (4-0) . 




Electives 

14 ( - ) 


Electives 

14 ( - ) 


Electives 

18 ( - ) 



* For young men. 

f For young women. 

t If the student is planning to elect the biological groups for the junior and senior 
years, English Literature and Analytical Geometry must be chosen at this point instead 
of English Literature I and English Literature II. 

§ Electives are to be chosen by groups, and in combinations approved by the Faculty 
or the dean of the Division of General Science. 



224 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



Elective Groups —Course in General Science 



FALL 



Elementary German I 
4 (4-0) 



(lerman Comedies 
4 (4-0) 



Calculus I 
4 (4-0) 



Radiant Energy 
4 (3-2) 



Inorganic Chemistry I 
5 (3-4) 



Organic Chemistry I 
5 (3-4) 



WINTER 


SPRING 


1 




Elementary German II 
4 (4-0) 


German Readings 
4 (4-0) 


2 




German Prose I 
4 (4-0) 


German Prose II 
4 (4-0) 


3 




Calculus II 
4 (4-0) 


Calculus III 
4 (4-0) 


4 




Physical Measurements 
4 (2-4) 


Physical Manipulations 
4 (2-4) 


5 

Inorganic Chemistry II 
5 (3-4) 


Inorganic Chemistry III 
5 (3-4) 


6 




Organic Chemistry II 
5 (3-4) 


Organic Chemistry III 
5 (3-4) 



Physiological Chemistry I Physiological Chemistry II Physiological Chemistry III 



4 (2-4) 



4 (2-4) 



4 (2-4) 



Advanced Zoology I 

4 (2-4) or 
General Bacteriology 

4 (2-4) 



Advanced Zoology II 
4 (2-4) 



Advanced Zoology III 
4 (2-4) 



Plant Pathology I 
4 (2-4) 



Economic Botany 
4 (2-4) 



Plant Pathology II 
4 (2-4) 

10 

Evolution of Plants 
4 (4-0) 



Taxonomic Botany 
4 (1-6) 



Plant Breeding or 
Plant Physiology III 

4 (2-4) 
Mathematics of Biology 

4 (4-0) 



General Entomology 
4 (3-2) 



Plant Pathology I 
4 (2-4) 



Plant Pathology I 
4 (2-4) 



11 

Taxonomy of Ijo sects 
4 (0-8) 



12 



Parasitology 
3 (2-2) 



13 

Dairy Bacteriology 
4 (2-4) 



Gen. Economic Entomology 
4 (3-2) 



Economic Zoology 

4 (2-4) 
Mathematics of Biology 

4 (4-0) 



Hygienic Bacteriology 
4 (2-4) 



Division of General Science 



225 



Elective Groups — Course in General Science — continued. 

FALL "WINTER SPRING 

14 



Soil Microbiology 
4 (2-4) 



General Bacteriology 
4 (2-4) 



Human Nutrition 
4 (4-0) 



Domestic Art I 

2 (0-4) 
Costume Design 

4 (0-8) 
Color and Design I 

2 (0-4) 



History of Education 

5 (5-0) 
School Hygiene 

2 (2-0) 



Cereal Crop Production 

5 (3-4) 
Market Types and Classes of 
Stock 4 (1-6) 



Farm Poultry Production 

3 (2-2) 

Forage Crop Improvement 

4 (1-6) 



Woodwork I 

4 (1-6) 
Woodwork III G 

6 (2-8) 



Engineering Physics I 

5 (3-4) 
Blacksmithing II 

3 (1-4) 
Machine Shop I 

3 (1-4) 
Clay Modeling 

3 (0-6) 



Serum Therapy 
4 (3-2) 



15 



Household Microbiology II 
4 (2-4) 

16 

Food Preparation 

4 (2-4) 
Food and Nutrition I 

6 (3-6) 

17 

Domestic Art II 

2 (0-4) 
Drafting and Pattern Making 

2 (0-4) 



18 

Rural Education 

4 (4-0) 
Agricultural Education or 
Home Econ. Education or 
Industrial Education 

2 (2-0) 

19 

Forage Crops 

4 (3-2) 
Breeding Types and Classes 
ol Stock 4 (1-6) 



20 

Farm Forestry 

4 (3-2) 
Soils 

5 (3-4) 

21 

Woodwork IV G 

3 (1-4) 
Wood Turning G 

3 (1-4) 



22 

Engineering Physics II 

5 (3-4) 
Blacksmithing III G 

3 (1-4) 
Machine Shop II 

3 (1-4) 



Water Purification and Sew- 
age Disposal 4 (1-6) 
Mathematics of Biology 
4 (4-0) 



Human Physiology 
4 (4-0) 



Food and Nutrition II 
4 (2-4) 



Domestic Art III 

2 (0-4) 
Dressmaking 

2 (0-4) 
Working Drawings 

2 (0-4) 



School Administration 

4 (4-0) 
Educational Psychology 

4 (4-0) 



Elements of Dairying 

4 (2-4) 
Farm Mechanics 

4 (2-4) 



Plant Propagation 

4 (3-2) 
Landscape Gardening 

3 (2-2) 



Blacksmithing I 

3 (1-4) 
Foundry 

3 (1-4) 
Pattern Making 

3 (1-4) 



Engineering Physic* III 

6 (4-4) 
Blacksmithing IT G 

2 (1-2) 
Machine Shop III G 

3 (1-4) 
Kinematics I 

4 (4-0) 



—8 



226 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



Elective Groups — Course in General Science} — continued. 



FALL WINTER 


SPRING 


23 




Rhetoric of Oratory American Literature or 
4 (4-0) 19th Century Literature 
4 (4-0) 


The English Drama or 
The English Novel 
4 (4-0) 


24 




History of Economic Thought Business Organization 
4 (4-0) 2 (2-0) 


Money and Banking 
2 (2-0) 


Labor Problems 
2 (2-0) 


Public Finance 
2 (2-0) 



Theory of Music 
History of Music 
Harmony 



25 

One hour of each a week throughout the year, with instru- 
mental or vocal music daily. 12 credit units. 



26 

Harmony, continued through the year, with instrumental or vocal lessons and daily prac- 
tice. 12 credit units. 



French History 
4 (4-0) 



27 

Modern Europe 
4 (4-0) or 

Business Law 
2 (2-0) and 

International Law 
2 (2-0) 



American History II 

4 (4-0) or 
Kansas History 

2 (2-0) and 
Farm Law 

2 (2-0) 



Sociology 
4 (4-0) 



28 

Business Law 

2 (2-0) 
International Law 

2 (2-0) 



American Literature 
4 (4-0) 



General Entomology 
4 (3-2) 



29 

General Bacteriology 
4 (2-4) 



Human Physiology 
4 (4-0) 



Elementary Journalism 

2 (2-0) 
Journalism Practice I 

2 (0-4) 



30 

Farm Writing 

2 (2-0) 
Journalism Practice II 

2 (0-4) 



Gathering News 

2 (2-0) 
Journalism Practice III 

2 (0-4) 



Copy Reading 
2 (2-0) 

Journalism Practice IT 
2 (0-4) 



31 

Newspaper Law 

2 (2-0) 
Journalism Practice V 

2 (0-4) 



Editorial Practice 

2 (2-0) 
Journalism Practice VI 

2 (0-4) 



Ink Rendering 
2 (0-4) 



32 

Color Bendering 
2 (0-4) 



Linear Perspective 
2 (0-4) 



General Bacteriology 

4 (4-0) 
Histology III 

4 (2-4) 
'Pathology I 

7 (5-4) 
Anatomy I 

6% (1-11) 



33 

Histology I 

7 (5-4) 
Comp. Physiology I 

4 (2-4) 
Pathology II 

7 (4-6) 



Histology II 

4 (2-4) 
Comp. Physiology II 

7 (5-4) 
Pathology III 

7 (4-6) 



Division of General Science 



227 



Elective Groups — Course in General Science — continued. 

FALL WINTER SPRING 

34 



Sociology 


Rural Sociology 


Community Surveys 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 

35 


2 (2-0) 


Argumentation and Debate 


English Practice 


Applied English 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 

36 


4 (4-0) 


Bible English 


Farm and Home English 


Business English 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 

37 


4 (4-0) 


Farm Advertising 


Farm Stories 


Farm Bulletins 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 

28 


3 (3-0) 


Industrial Chemistry I 


Industrial Chemistry II 


Industrial Chemistry III 


6 (3-6) 


6 (3-6) 

39 


6 (3-6) 


Analytical Geometry 


Calculus 


Teachers' Course in Mathe- 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


matics 4 (4-0) 


The following subjects and others may be elected independently of other members c 


groups if prerequisites have been taken: 




•General Entomology 


Technique of Speech 


Human Physiology 


4 (3-2) 


2 (2-0) 


4 (4-0) 


General Bacteriology 


General Bacteriology 


General Geology 


4 (2-4) 


4 (2-4) 


4 (4-0) 


Sociology 


Ethics 


American Literature 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


Industrial Education 


School Administration 


Forms of Public Address 


2 (2-0) 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


Modern Europe 


Rural Sociology 


American History II 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


Photography 


Rural Education 


German Classics 


3 (2-2) 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 

Applications 

1 (1-0) 



The following illustrative combinations have been arranged: 
Physics and Mathematics — 1, 3, 4, 5, 28, and 29. 

Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics — 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and Analytical Geometry. 
Chemistry and Mathematics — 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7. 
Chemistry and Domestic Science — 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 15, and 16. 
Biological Science, major work in Botany — 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, and 10. 
Biological Science, major work in Zoblogv — 1, 2, 7, 8, 11, and 12. 
Biological Science, major work in Bacteriology — 1, 2, 7, 8, 13, and 14. 
Education and Domestic Science and Art — 1, 2 t 15, 16, 17, and 18. 
Education and Agriculture — 1, 2, 18, 19, and 20. 
Education and Manual Training — 3, 18, 21. and 22. 

Education and Humanities — 18, 23, 24, and 27 and two groups Mathematics or Science. 
History and English — 1, 2, 23, and 27 and two groups Mathematics or Science. 
History and Economics — 1, 2, 24, and 27 and two groups Mathematics or Science. 
Economics and English — 1, 2, 23, 24, and two groups Mathematics or Science. 
English and Musics — 1, 23, 25, 26, and two groups Mathematics or Science. 

Students expecting to teach should take group 18. 



228 



Kansas State Agricultural College 



Course in Industrial Journalism 

The Arabic numeral immediately following the name of a subject indicates the number 
of credits, while the numerals in parentheses indicate the number of hours a week of 
recitation and of laboratory, respectively. 





FRESHMAN 




FALL 


WINTER 


SPRING 


English I 


English II 


College Rhetoric I 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


Chemistry I 


Chemistry II 


Chemistry III 


4 (3-2) 


4 (2-4) 


4 (3-2) 


Library Methods 


Public Speaking 


Advanced English History 


2 (1-2) 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


Composition I-J 


Composition II-J 




2 (0-4) 


2 (0-4) 




Object Drawing 




Geometrical Drawing 


2 (0-4) 




2 (0-4) 


Electives 


Electives 


Electives 


4(-) 


4(-) 


4(-) 


Military Drill,* or 


Military Drill,* or 


Military Drill,* or 


Physical Training! 


Physical Training! 

SOPHOMORE 


Physical Trainingf 


College Rhetoric II 


English Literature I 


English Literature II 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


General Zoology I 


General Zoology II 


General Bacteriology 


4 (2-4) 


4 (2-4) 


4 (2-4) 




Modern Europe 


Economics 




4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


Electives 


Electives 


Electives 


8 (-) 


«(-> 


6 (-) 


Military Drill,* er 


Military Drill,* or 


Military Drill,* or 


Physical Traihingt 


Physical Trainingf 

JUNIOR 


Physical Trainingf 


Elementary Journalism 


Farm Writing 


Gathering News 


2 (2-0) 


2 (2-0) 


2 (2-0) 


Journalism Practice I 


Journalism Practice II 


Journalism Practice III 


2 (0-4) 


2 (0-4) 


2 (0-4) 


American Government 


American History I 


American History II 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


4 (4-0) 


Electives 


Electives 


Electives 


10(-) 


10 ( - ) 

SENIOR 


10(-) 


Copy Beading 


Newspaper Law 


Editorial Practice 


2 (2-0) 


2 (2-0) 


2 (2-0) 


Journalism Practice IV 


Journalism Practice V 


Journalism Practice VI 


2 (0-4) 


2 (0-4) 


2 (0-4) 


Principles of Sociology 


Business Organization 




4 (4-0) 


2 (2-0) 




Electives 


Electives 


Electives 


10 (•) 


12 ( - ) 


14 (-) 



# The electives of this course are to be chosen in groups adapted to imparting added pro- 
ficiency in selected lines of journalistic activity, especially those of agriculture, home eco- 
nomics, mechanic arts and applied science. Some of the possibilities are included in the 
list of elective groups" available for students in the course in general science ; others may 
be arranged by conference with the dean of the division. 

* For young men. 

t For young women. 



Division of General Science 229 



Bacteriology 

Professor Bushnell 
Instructor Hunter 
Instructor Jackley 
Assistant Glasgow 

The Department of Bacteriology occupies a part of the first and second 
floors of Veterinary Hall. The space is divided into offices and private 
laboratories, an experiment station and research laboratory, two large 
general laboratories, incubator or temperature room, wash room, and 
stock room. The laboratories are well lighted and equipped with gas, 
lockers, ice chests, sterilizers, wall cases, microscopes, and other modern 
facilities necessary for bacteriological work. 

The instruction consists of lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and 
laboratory practice. Printed synopses of the lectures, and printed lab- 
oratory directions, are furnished the students in some of the courses; in 
others, textbooks are required. The departmental library contains text- 
books on bacteriology and allied subjects, also the current files of the 
important technical periodicals relating to bacteriology. These are at 
the constant disposal of the students for reference. To those who desire 
graduate work, the department offers excellent facilities. 

Bacteriology is presented to the student as a biological science, and as 
a practical factor in every-day life. In this subject only the simplest 
forms of life, consisting almost invariably of one-celled organisms, are 
studied. At the present time it is possible to study these microscopical 
forms with ease and accuracy, thus paving the way for a more complete 
study and a better understanding of cells in the aggregate. The second 
point of view from which this subject is approached is that of its prac- 
tical application in agriculture, medicine, domestic science, and sanitary 
engineering. 

COUESES IN BACTERIOLOGY 

1. — General Bacteriology. Sophomore or junior year, fall, winter, 
and spring terms. Lectures, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Four 
credits. Required in the courses in agriculture and industrial journalism; 
elective in the course in general science. Prerequisite: Elementary Or- 
ganic Chemistry. 

This general introductory course consists of lectures, recitations, and 
demonstrations, covering the morphological and biological characters, the 
classification and the distribution of bacteria; factors necessary for the 
development of bacteria; culture media, cultural features, staining values, 
and fundamental principles of applied bacteriology. 

Laboratory. — The student prepares culture media, and becomes fa- 
miliar with principles of sterilization and incubation, and with gen- 
eral laboratory technique. During the last half of the term, organisms 
representing the different families and genera of Migula's classification 
are studied microscopically and culturally. Also, preliminary quantita- 
tive and qualitative examinations are made of milk, water, soil, etc. 

2. — Pathogenic Bacteriology. I, sophomore year, winter term; II, 
junior year, winter term. Lectures, two hours; laboratory, four hours. 
Four credits each term. Required in the course in veterinary medicine. 
Prerequisite: Elementary Organic Chemistry. 



230 Kansas State Agricultural College 

^ A study is made of the morphology, powers of resistance, pathogenesis, 
distribution, channels of infection and means of dissemination of patho- 
genic bacteria, especially those related to the specific infectious diseases 
of animals; variations in the nature of infectious diseases; antitoxins, 
vaccines, and specific treatments; epizootic and epidemic diseases of un- 
known etiology are further treated. 

Laboratory. — A study is made of the microscopical and cultural char- 
acter of pathogenic microorganisms; of laboratory animal inoculations, 
autopsy, and diagnosis; of the preparation of tuberculin, mallein, and 
other biological products used in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment 
of specific infectious diseases. Printed laboratory directions are fur- 
nished. 

3. — Sanitary Biology I and II. Sophomore year, spring term; junior 
year, fall term. Lecture, one hour ; laboratory, four hours. Three credits 
each term. Required in the course in civil engineering. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry III. 

Consideration is given to morphology, classification, distribution and 
life processes of bacteria. Attention is given, also, to general characters 
of algas, fungi and protozoa in their relation to potable water; to the 
interpretation of the results of quantitative and qualitative bacteriological 
examinations of water; to the significance of the presence of various 
bacterial species in drinking water; to water-borne diseases and micro- 
organisms involved; to typhoid-fever epidemics; to the bacteriology of 
sewage and sewage effluents, and to methods of water purification and 
sewage disposal. 

Laboratory. — During the first term of this course the student acquires 
a working knowledge of bacteriological technique. The second term is 
utilized in conducting quantitative and qualitative examinations of water 
and sewage from different sources, according to the standard methods. 
The course includes a comparative study of presumptive tests for the 
detection of the presence of B. coli communis in water. Printed labora- 
tory directions are furnished. 

4. — Household Microbiology I and II. Junior year, fall and winter 
terms, respectively. Class work, two hours ; laboratory, four hours. Four 
credits each term. Eequired in the course in home economics. Elective 
in the course in general science. Prerequisite: Elementary Organic 
Chemistry. 

This course is designed to give the student a more thorough knowledge 
of those microorganisms of importance in the household. The signifi- 
cance of microbial findings in the analysis of water, milk, and foods, 
also, consideration of the conditions which tend to increase or decrease 
the bacterial content of food substances, are studied in detail. Some time 
is given to the principles of sanitation as applied to public health prob- 
lems. The class work is a more theoretical consideration of the problems 
undertaken in the laboratory. 

Laboratory. — A study of microorganisms and their activities, both 
beneficial and harmful, in their relation to household economy, bacterio- 
logical study of water, milk, and foods; the determination of the potability 
of water; milk contamination, the effect of cooling upon the bacterial 
content of milk, pasteurization of milk, etc. ; microscopical study of yeasts 
and molds ; the spoilage of canned vegetables and fruits, methods of food 
preservation; the manufacture of vinegar; study of activities of various 
species of microorganisms, thermal death point, the germicidal action of 
various disinfectants, etc., are taken up in the laboratory work. Printed 
laboratory directions are furnished. 

5. — Serum Therapy. Junior year, spring term. Lectures, three 
hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Eequired in the course in 
veterinary science; elective in the course in general science. Pre- 
requisites: Pathogenic Bacteriology I, and either Pathogenic Bacteri- 
ology II or Hygienic Bacteriology. 



Division of General Science 231 

A detailed study is made of the manufacture, standardization, prepara- 
tion for the market, and use of vaccines, antitoxins, and other biological 
products related to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of specific 
infectious diseases ; of susceptibility, immunity, and infection ; of theories 
of immunity; of anaphylaxis, opsonins, preciptins, bacteriolysins, and 
agglutinins. 

Laboratory. — Experimental production of opsonins, antitoxins, ag- 
glutinins, preciptins, and cytolysins; experiments showing the constitu- 
tion and mode of action of these antibodies ; production of active and 
passive anaphylaxis, and of anaphylatoxin ; methods for the production 
and standardization of biological products, such as diphtheria and tetanus 
antitoxin, bacterins, etc.; the application of the various phenomena of 
immunity in the diagnosis of infectious diseases; the identification, of 
animal and vegetable proteins; complement fixation tests for glanders, 
Wassermann tests, opsonic technique, etc., comprise the laboratory work. 

6. — Soil Microbiology. Elective, fall term. Lecture, two hours; lab- 
oratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective in the courses in agriculture 
and general science. Prerequisite: General Bacteriology. 

This is an introductory course covering the principles of soil micro- 
biology as defined at the present time, and fitting the student for in- 
dependent research on microbial investigations of soil, including the in- 
fluence on microbial flora of depth and character of soil, temperature, 
moisture, chemical reaction, aeration, and other factors; activities of soil 
microorganisms, ammonification, nitrification, denitrification, symbiotic 
and nonsymbiotic nitrogen fixation. Printed copies of synopses of lectures 
are furnished. Various texts are recommended as reference books. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work comprises the preparation of vari- 
ous special culture media and reagents necessary to conduct bacterio- 
logical analyses of the soil; qualitative analysis and the laboratory study 
of ammonification, nitrification, denitrification, symbiotic and nonsym- 
biotic nitrogen fixation; plot experiments and field work illustrating the 
influence of various factors upon the bacterial flora, and the inoculation 
of soil with symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Printed laboratory direc- 
tions are furnished. 

7. — Hygienic Bacteriology. Elective, winter term. Lectures, two 
hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective in the courses in 
home economics and general science. Prerequisite : General Bacteriology. 

Pathogenic bacteria, especially those related to diseases of man ; chan- 
nels of infection, and means of dissemination of pathogenic bacteria; 
epidemics, their cause and control; isolation, disinfection, and quarantine; 
prophylaxis against specific infectious diseases, and important precau- 
tions necessary in the control of communicable diseases, are studied. 
Jordan's Textbook of Bacteriology is recommended as a textbook. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work comprises microscopical and cul- 
tural study of pathogenic bacteria; technique involved in the diagnosis 
of Bacterium tuberculosis in sputum; the culture of pathogenic anaerobic 
bacteria; the isolation and identification of pathogenic bacteria from 
animal tissues, from pus and exudates; bacteriological examination of 
air, water, milk, sewage; interpretation of results, etc. 

8. — Dairy Bacteriology. Elective, spring term. Lectures, two hours; 
laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective in the courses in agri- 
culture and general science. Prerequisite : General Bacteriology. 

Consideration is given to the bacterial flora of milk, butter, and cheese ; 
to infectious diseases conveyed through dairy products; to bacterial con- 
tamination of milk by air, water, utensils, etc. ; to normal and abnormal 
fermentations in milk, their significance and control. 

Laboratory. — The preparation of culture media necessary for dairy 
bacteriological work; milk contamination; quantitative and qualitative 
bacteriological analyses of milk; the microscopical and cultural charac- 



232 Kansas State Agricultural College 

ters of the types of microorganisms representing the flora of milk, butter, 
and cheese; types of milk- fermenting organisms; the examination of 
cream, wash water, and separator slime; the effect of temperature on 
the growth of milk bacteria; pasteurization of milk; examination of milk 
for the presence of Bacterium tuberculosis, leucocytes and streptococci 
are taken up in the laboratory work. Various texts are recommended as 
reference books. 

9. — Bacteriology of Poultry Diseases and Poultry Products. Elec- 
tive, spring term. Lectures, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Four 
credits. Elective in courses in agriculture and general science. Pre- 
requisite: General Bacteriology. 

Consideration is given to the various microbial diseases of poultry; 
etiology, sources and modes of infection; prevention and cure; to the 
microbial content of freshly laid eggs, cold storage eggs, and egg prod- 
ucts, with conditions tending toward increase or decrease of this content. 

Laboratory, — Microorganisms pathogenic for poultry; artificial pro- 
duction, diagnosis and control of diseases in the laboratory; microbial 
content of eggs, and egg preparations produced and handled under various 
conditions, form the subject matter of the laboratory work. Laboratory 
directions are furnished. 

10. — Water Purification and Sewage Disposal. Elective, spring 
term. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, six hours. Four credits. Pre- 
requisite: General Bacteriology or Sanitary Biology II. 

The course comprises a study of the bacterial content of natural 
waters; of factors influencing the bacterial flora of the water; of bacterial 
indicators of pollution; of the collection and transportation of water 
samples; of methods of water purification and sewage disposal; of the 
application of water sanitation to rural homes and municipalities. Pres- 
cott and Winslow's Elements of Water Bacteriology and Savage's Water 
Supplies are recommended as textbooks. 

Laboratory, — The laboratory work consists of quantitative and quali- 
tative examinations, according to standard methods, of water and sewage 
samples; methods involved in the enumeration and identification of intes- 
tinal bacteria in water; laboratory study of conditions influencing the 
bacterial content and potability of water. Printed laboratory directions 
are furnished. 



Botany 

Professor Robebts 
Assistant Professor Davis 
Instructor Milleb 
Assistant Wells 
Assistant Melchers 
Assistant Poole 

The instruction given in the Department of Botany has a threefold 
purpose : 

First, general training in botany as an observational science, familiar- 
izing the students with the meaning and relations of the manifold forms 
of plants, and the principles governing their life-processes. For those 
who wish to pursue the subject of botany professionally, excellent oppor- 
tunities are offered to secure a broad and thorough training in the 
advanced courses given by the department. 

Second, the importance of a scientific knowledge of the laws of plant 
life being fundamental in agriculture, it is sought in the elementary 
courses to provide such training as will generally fit the minds of agri- 



Division of General Science 233 

cultural students to grasp the underlying meaning of familiar field work 
with crops; such training, moreover, as may be built upon in a carefully 
graded series of advanced courses. 

The third phase of the work of the Department of Botany lies in the 
investigation of those economic problems in plant life which affect agri- 
culture. Three distinct general lines of work in botany and plant breed- 
ing are being conducted in the Experiment Station: experimental plant 
breeding; the investigation, prevention and control of plant diseases; 
physiological investigations in drouth resistance; and seed control, i. e. t 
the determination of the purity and vitality of agricultural seeds for 
farmers, seedsmen, and others. 

The equipment for elementary instruction comprises thirty compound 
and sixty-four simple microscopes, a series of Jung, Peter, Kny, and 
Frank botanical charts, a Bausch & Lomb projection apparatus, and a 
very full collection of preserved material for general morphology and 
pathology. For advanced work, Zeiss and Spencer microscopes with 
apochromatic lenses, a filar micrometer, a Bausch & Lomb camera lucida, 
a Zeiss drawing table, a Zeiss binocular microscope, and Bausch & Lomb 
simple microscopes of the highest grade, provided with special camera 
lucida attachment, are furnished for the use of the members of the staff 
and graduate students. A Minot precision microtome, Spencer microtome, 
embedding and sterilizing ovens, and the usual supplies of reagents and 
glassware, are provided for histological study. 

In physiology, a complete equipment of the Ganong and the Cambridge 
lines of physiological apparatus and supplies is available. A large, well- 
equipped dark room, provided with a Folmer & Schwing enlarging, 
reducing and lantern-slide camera, a field camera of the best type, and a 
Bausch & Lomb photomicrographic apparatus, affords opportunity for 
the preparation of botanical photographs, lantern slides, illustrations for 
bulletins, etc. 

In the Experiment Station laboratory are kept various instruments of 
precision employed in quantitative work in plant-breeding investigations, 
including special forms of apparatus used for taking measurements of 
organs, a specially designed gravimeter, an improved colorimeter, an 
Egli calculating machine, a Comptograph adding machine, a Corelli polar 
planimeter, specific gravity apparatus, numerous balances, the usual 
glassware, etc. 

For general botanical reference there is an excellent herbarium, espe- 
cially complete for the state of Kansas, and a very full collection of 
economic fungi. A very good botanical library is available, containing 
the usual standard texts and reference works, and files of the principal 
foreign journals. 

COURSES IN BOTANY 

1. — General Botany. Freshman year, fall term. Class work, three 
hours; laboratory, four hours. Five credits. Required in the courses in 
agriculture and general science. Text to be selected. 

This is a general introduction to botany. A careful study is made of 
the morphology of the chief great groups of plants, of their elementary 
physiology and ecology, and of the classification and geographic distri- 
bution of the plant kingdom, and its economic relation to man. 



234 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Laboratory. — The aim of the laboratory work in this course is to give 
as thorough a study as may be of the morphology of the chief important 
groups in the plant kingdom, taken in the order of their relative com- 
plexity, and of their probable relations to one another as parts of an 
evolutionary series. An excellent and very complete series of prepared 
slides is of assistance in this work. Laboratory outlines are furnished 
by the department. 

2. — Plant Anatomy. Freshman year, winter term. Class work, 
three hours; laboratory, four hours. ^ Five credits. Required in the 
courses in agriculture and general science. Text, Plant Anatomy, by 
W. C. Stevens. 

This course comprises a detailed study of the anatomical structure of 
the organs and tissues of the .higher plants, with especial reference to 
their origin and mode of development. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work consists of a microscopic study of 
the development of the growing plant, of the origin and differentiation of 
leaf, stem and root organs, and the development of the flower and the 
seed. A study is also made of the development of internal tissue systems, 
such as the vascular bundles, latex vessels, resin ducts, etc.; of the pro- 
tective system of bark and cortex, and of auxiliary tissues, such as 
sclerenchyma or hard bast fibers, as in flax, hemp, etc. The purpose of 
the course is to familiarize the student thoroughly with the anatomical 
and structural characters of the seed plants from the developmental 
standpoint. Laboratory outlines are furnished by the department. 

3. — Plant Physiology I. Freshman year, spring term; sophomore 
year, winter term. Class work, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Four 
credits. Required in the courses in agriculture and general science. 
Prerequisites: General Botany; Plant Anatomy. 

This is a course of lectures, combined with special study of a required 
text and with reference reading. The principal life functions of plants, 
such as photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration and growth, and the 
responses of plants to environmental conditions and physical stimuli, are 
studied in detail. In this course the student gains a general introductory 
knowledge of the functions and reactions of plants, and learns to regard 
them from the dynamic standpoint, as working organisms. Text, Plant 
Physiology, by C. R. Barnes. 

Laboratory. — A series of typical experiments is followed out in the 
physiological laboratory and in the greenhouse. Each student is fur- 
nished with a set of the necessary apparatus, and learns to apply quanti- 
tative methods to the study of functions. Laboratory outlines are fur- 
nished by the department. Prerequisite: Laboratory work in General 
Botany and in Plant Anatomy. 

4. — Medical Botany. Sophomore year, fall term. Class work, one 
hour; laboratory, four hours. Three credits. Required in the course in 
veterinary medicine. Prerequisite: High-school Botany or General 
Biology. 

This course involves a brief survey of the principal plants of the 
pharmacopoeia. Especial attention is given to poisonous plants and their 
identification. Instruction is by lectures. 

. Laboratory. — This comprises microscopic study of plant products used 
as drugs, and a laboratory study of toxic plants. Laboratory outlines 
are provided by the department. Prerequisite: Laboratory work in 
Elementary Botany III. 

5. — Plant Breeding. Junior year, winter term. Class work, two 
hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Required in the course in 
agriculture; elective in the course in general science. Prerequisite: 
General Botany. 



Division of General Science 235 

This subject involves a study of the present knowledge of variation 
and heredity as applied to the breeding and improvement of economic 
plants. The history of the principal theories bearing upon genetic 
problems is reviewed, and the experimental data are critically considered. 
The principles underlying the behavior of hybrids are discussed. A 
survey is given of the practical results achieved in the breeding of plants, 
together with a scientific analysis of the methods used. Text, Genetics, 
by Walter, supplemented by lectures and reference reading. 

6. — Advanced Plant Breeding. Elective, fall term. Class work, 
three hours ; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Elective in the course 
in agriculture. Prerequisite: Plant Breeding. 

The work of Plant Breeding is continued, with especial reference to 
the practical details, technique, and history of the breeding of the principal 
economic plants. Research work and reference reading in the literature 
of Mendelian investigations are required. A thesis involving a review 
of the work in some phase of genetics is required. A reading knowledge 
of German is essential. 

7. — Plant Physiology II. Elective, spring term. Lecture, two hours ; 
laboratory work, four hours. Elective in the courses in agriculture and 
general science. Prerequisite: Plant Physiology I. 

This course offers opportunity for advanced work upon special prob- 
lems in plant physiology, to be selected by the department for investi- 
gation. 

8. — Economic Botany. Elective, fall term. Class work, two hours; 
laboratory, four hours. Pour credits. Elective in the courses in agri- 
culture and general science. Prerequisite: Plant Morphology. 

This course is designed especially for students intending to enter pro- 
fessional work in botany in experiment stations. It involves a study of 
the history of cultivated plants, with a course of lectures on the chief 
groups of the higher plants containing economic species. In this connec- 
tion a very broad survey^ is taken of the world's economic plants, consid- 
erable attention being given to the derivation of economic products and 
to methods of cultivation and harvesting. The plants of tropical and 
subtropical agriculture and horticulture are given considerable attention. 
Forestry products are not considered. Text, The Origin of Cultivated 
Plants, by De Candolle. Lectures and reference reading. 

Laboratory, — A microscopic study of economic plant products, such as 
fibers and textiles, food products, spices, etc. Laboratory outlines are 
furnished by the department. Prerequisite : Laboratory work in General 
Botany. 

9. — Plant Pathology I. Elective, fall term. Class work, two hours; 
laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in general 
science and agriculture. Prerequisite: Plant Physiology II. ' 

The diseases affecting the chief economic crops of field, orchard and 
garden are studied in considerable detail. The etiology of the various 
diseases and their most evident symptoms are discussed, and the student 
learns to recognize at sight the principal plant diseases he is likely to 
encounter on the farm and in nursery, and in market-garden work. 
Physiological and bacterial diseases are considered to some extent, but 
the time is devoted chiefly to the more important diseases caused by the 
higher fungi, the life histories of which are studied in detail. Preventive 
measures are considered in each case, with special reference to the scien- 
tific principles underlying their application. An extensive collection of 
preserved pathological material and a .large herbarium of exsiccatae of 
economic fungi are available. Text, Fungous Diseases of Plants, by 
Duggar. 

Laboratory, — Detailed microscopic studies of diseased tissues, and 
identification of the fungus parasites which cause them, comprise the 
laboratory work. In the case of physiological diseases, the structural 



236 Kansas State Agricultural College 

changes induced in the tissues are worked out with the microscope. 
Laboratory outlines are furnished by the department. Prerequisite: 
Laboratory work in Plant Physiology II. 

10. — Plant Pathology II. Elective, winter term. Class work, two 
hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in 
general science. Prerequisite: Plant Pathology I. 

This is a continuation of Plant Pathology I, involving the study of 
laboratory and field methods in the investigation of plant diseases, the 
growing of pure cultures of parasitic fungi, the making of inoculations, 
etc: This course is especially designed for those who intend to pursue 
plant pathology as investigators in experiment stations. Lectures and 
reference reading. 

Laboratory. — As described in the preceding course. Laboratory out- 
lines are furnished by the department. Prerequisite: Laboratory work 
in Plant Pathology I. 

11. — Evolution of Plants. Elective, winter term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in general science. Pre- 
requisite: Economic Botany, class and laboratory work. 

Careful consideration is given to the lines along which evolution has 
proceeded in the plant kingdom, to the relationships of the more impor- 
tant phyla and to the probable derivation of the chief groups of plants. 
Text, Evolution of Plants, by Campbell. Lectures and reference reading. 

12. — Taxonomic Botany. Elective, spring term. Class work, one 
hour; laboratory, six hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in gen- 
eral science. Prerequisite: General Botany. 

This course is designed to give biological students a broad training in 
the systematic relationships chiefly of the flowering plants. Practice is 
acquired in the use of manuals or keys to floras, and the student is taught 
especially to recognize the morphological characters which distinguish 
the principal orders, families and genera of the angiosperms. The course 
Is designed to be a strictly practical one, its purpose being to equip the 
student with the necessary data for recognizing at sight a large number 
of the plants of the field, mainly of the higher groups, although some 
attention is also paid to the identification of ferns, mosses, and liver- 
worts, and of the commoner algae and fungi. Lectures and reference 
reading. 

Laboratory. — The identification, by means of standard manuals and 
floras, of a large number of native and exotic plants. Considerable field 
practice is required, and attention is directed to differences in structure 
which the same species may show under different environments. An 
endeavor is made to train the student's mind to a broad, comprehensive 
conception of species characters, using manuals merely as convenient 
guides to this end. Laboratory guide, Gray's Manual of Botany, seventh 
edition, revised. Prerequisite: Laboratory work in General Botany. 

13. — Seed Testing. Elective, spring term. Laboratory, two hours. 
One credit. Elective in the course in agriculture. Prerequisite: General 
Botany. 

The student becomes familiar with the details of structure of the seeds 
of all' the principal races of agricultural plants grown in this region, and 
learns to distinguish those seeds which are used as ' adulterants or as 
fraudulent substitutes. Considerable time is also devoted to the identi- 
fication of weed seeds and of weed plants, in both the seedling and the 
adult stages. Practice work is given in making purity and germination 
tests of seeds, according to the official rules and methods for seed testing. 
Laboratory outlines furnished by the department. 



Division of General Science 237 



Chemistry 

Professor Willaed 
Assistant Professor King 
Assistant Professor Swanson 
Assistant Professor Newman 
Assistant Professor Hughes 
Assistant Professor Bbubakeb 
Assistant G-utsche 
Assistant Midler 
Assistant Murphy 

All of the industries are becoming more and more dependent for their 
highest success upon intelligent application of the sciences, and the special 
sciences are making their greatest progress by tracing their phenomena 
back to the physical and chemical changes that accompany them. A study 
of chemistry and physics is therefore essential to any understanding of 
the processes of nature or of human industry. In the instruction in 
chemistry, the aim is to insist upon a mastery of the chief concepts of the 
pure science through the agency of textbook drill, accompanied by demon- 
strations in the lecture room, and experimental observations by the stu- 
dent himself in the laboratory. As the course proceeds, illustrations of 
chemical principles are drawn from the industrial processes of the chem- 
ical, , agricultural, domestic, and other, arts, thus impressing upon the 
mind the practical nature of the study. The ultimate object of instruc- 
tion in this science is to develop in the student the power to form inde- 
pendent judgments upon the manifold problems of daily life in which 
chemistry plays a part. 

The lecture rooms are amply equipped for experiments and demon- 
strations, and the laboratories are designed to accommodate 800 students 
per term in freshman work and qualitative analysis. The, laboratories 
for more advanced work provide space for 100 students, and are well 
supplied with general and special facilities. The State work in foods, 
feeding stuffs, and fertilizers, and the chemical investigations of the 
Experiment Station in soils, crops, animal nutrition, etc., afford un- 
usually, good opportunities for students to obtain experience in practical 
chemistry. 

COURSES IN CHEMISTRY 

1. — Chemistry I. Lectures and recitations, three hours; laboratory, 
two hours. Four credits. Required in all courses. Prerequisite: Ele- 
mentary Physics. Not open, as a rule, to students who have had a good 
high-school course in chemistry. See Chemistry la to Ilia. 

This term's work begins the study of elementary inorganic chemistry, 
and includes a study of the elements oxygen, < hydrogen, chlorine, and 
their compounds, this being accompanied by theoretical treatment of the 
subjects of matter, energy, properties of gases, chemical law and theory, 
solution, electrolytic dissociation, acids, bases, and salts, and chemical 
change as related to light, heat, and electricity. It is designed, with the 
succeeding terms, to give the student a. knowledge of the fundamental 
principles of chemistry. As all subsequent progress in this science re- 
quires a working knowledge of its principal .theoretical conceptions,, the 
principles of nomenclature, -the significance of formulas, chemical equa- 
tions, etc., much attention is given to these, while at the same time the 
practical- uses of the substances, and the processes, used in metallurgy, 
engineering, agriculture, and other arts are emphasized. Neweirs Inor- 



238 Kansas State Agricultural College 

ganic Chemistry for Colleges is used, this term's work covering the first 

209 pages. The text is supplemented by lectures and is amply illustrated 
by experimental demonstrations. 

Laboratory. — As far as time permits, the student performs inde- 
pendently experiments touching the preparation, and properties of the 
more important substances. Preference is given to those operations which 
illustrate important principles, and the student is required, as far as pos- 
sible, to study experiments in that light. In this, as in all other labora- 
tory work in chemistry, the objects are to illustrate chemical phenomena 
and to teach care in manipulation, attentive observation, logical deduction,, 
and discrimination and accuracy in recording results and conclusions. 
The student is required to give the designated amount of time, and a 
minimum amount of work must be satisfactorily performed in order to 
obtain credit. Laboratory Exercises in Elementary Chemistry, by Wil- 
liam McPherson, is used as the laboratory guide. 

2. — Chemistry II. Lectures and recitations, two hours; laboratory, 
four hours. Four credits. Required in all courses. Not open, as a rule, 
to students who have had a good high-school course in chemistry. See 
Chemistry la to Ilia. 

The work under this head is a continuation of the study of elementary 
inorganic chemistry, and includes the elements nitrogen, carbon, sulphur, 
and their compounds, and a consideration of atomic weights, valence, and 
the classification of the elements. These subjects are included in pages 

210 to 355 of NewelPs Inorganic Chemistry for Colleges. 
Laboratory. — The laboratory work of this term is a continuation of 

that begun in the preceding term. 

3. — Chemistry III. Lectures and recitations, three hours ; laboratory,, 
two hours. Four credits. Required in all courses. Not open, as a rule, 
to t students who have had a good high-school course in chemistry. See 
Chemistry la to Ilia. 

This work completes the study of elementary inorganic chemistry be- 
gun in the preceding terms, and includes the consideration of fluorine* 
bromine, iodine, silicon, phosphorus, arsenic, antimony, and the metals. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work in this course is a beginning in 
qualitative analysis, for which McPherson's Elementary Treatise on 
Qualitative Analysis is used as the guide. 

la to 3a. — Chemistry la, Ha, and Ilia. These courses, covering three 
terms, are given for students who have had one year of high-school 
chemistry, but who did not obtain credit in Chemistry I and Chemistry 
II by examination. In the class-room work of these courses, A Course in 
General Chemistry by McPherson and Henderson is used as the textbook* 
and a more advanced course in laboratory work is given than that which 
accompanies the regular freshman work. 

4. — Qualitative Analysis. Sophomore year, fall and winter terms* 
Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Required in 
the courses in agriculture, veterinary medicine, home economics, and 
general science. Prerequisite: Chemistry III. 

In this course the prime object is to increase the student's knowledge 
of chemistry as a whole. The standard methods of analytical chemistry 
are made the basis of a systematic study of the chemical properties of the 
most important metals, nonmetals, acids, bases, and salts. The teaching 
of analysis as such is a secondary object, although the student is held to 
the exact observations and careful reasoning required in ascertaining the 
composition of single substances and mixtures. The exercises, which are 
outlined in a special pamphlet, include a review of the more important 
topics of inorganic chemistry, in which natural occurrence of elements and 
compounds, industrial chemical processes, and analytical reactions are 



Division of General Science 239 

seen to be closely connected. The exercises are so arranged as to pass 
from the simpler to the more difficult ones, and at the same time to 
facilitate the comparative study of the several cations and anions. The 
theories of chemistry receive constant application. The effect of the course 
is to broaden, strengthen, and unify the student's ideas of general chem- 
istry, to enlarge greatly his knowledge of chemical facts, and at the same 
time to fix many of them in his mind by associating them with the re- 
actions made use of in analytical processes. 

Laboratory. — The regular methods of qualitative analysis serve as a 
basis for a laboratory study of the chemical properties of substances. 
Laboratory manual, Qualitative Analysis, by W. A. Noyes. 

5. — Elementary Organic Chemistry. Sophomore year, winter term. 
Lectures and recitations, four hours. Four credits. Required in the 
courses in agriculture, home economics, and general science. Prerequisite : 
Chemistry III. 

A systematic study is made of the simpler examples of the more im- 
portant classes of organic compounds in their logical chemical relations. 
Such substances as touch the everyday affairs of life are treated in 
greater detail. Opportunity is thus afforded to consider the hydro- 
carbons, alcohols, organic acids, fats, soaps, sugars, starch, proteids, and 
other less-known substances. Compounds used for clothing, food, fuel, 
light, antiseptics, disinfectants, anesthetics, poisons, medicines, solvents, 
etc., are included. While especial attention is given to the useful organic 
compounds, the study of others is not excluded, when they contribute to 
an understanding of the systematic relations existing among the several 
groups. Any serious study of the biological sciences, or of the arts con- 
nected with them, must require this as a foundation, and a knowledge of 
the properties of organic compounds finds frequent application in en- 
gineering as well. The subject is amply illustrated by experiments in 
the lecture room. Text, Norris' Organic Chemistry, in part, accom- 
panied by lectures amplifying certain parts of the subject. 

6. — Agricultural Chemistry. Sophomore year, spring term, and 
junior year, fall term. Class work, two hours. Two credits. Required 
in the course in agriculture. Prerequisite: Qualitative Analysis. 

The work: of this term consists chiefly of a detailed study of the 
application of chemistry to agricultural problems, with especial reference 
to the income and outgo of the elements which determine success or failure 
in crop production, and hence the agricultural prosperity of a country. 
The following topics are among those included: the atmosphere, the soil, 
natural waters, plants, farm manures, commercial fertilizers, crops, feeds, 
and animal products. Text, General Agricultural Chemistry, by Hart and 
Tottingam. 

7. — Quantitative Analysis I. Sophomore year, spring term, or 
junior year, fall term. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. Required 
in the course in agriculture ; elective in others. Prerequisite: Qualita- 
tive Analysis. 

This consists of simple quantitative exercises, which are planned to 
give the student a knowledge of the simpler operations in quantitative 
analysis, as well as to lay the foundation for studies in which such 
knowledge is required. Quantitative analysis is at the basis of many 
investigations connected with agriculture, and the course is designed not 
only to increase the student's knowledge of chemistry, but to give him 
an appreciation of the value of exact quantitative work. 

8. — Quantitative Analysis II. Elective, junior year, fall or winter 
term. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. Prerequisite : Quantitative 
Analysis I. 

This consists of gravimetric determinations of silica, iron, aluminum, 
calcium, and magnesium in limestone; standardization of quantitative 



240 Kansas State Agricultural College 

apparatus; preparation of standard acid and alkali solutions of definite 
normality; and the determination of nitrogen in organic substances. 
Laboratory guide, Notes on Quantitative Chemical Analysis, by C. W. 
Foulk. 

9. — Quantitative Analysis III. Elective, junior year, winter or 
spring term. Laboratory, four hours. Two credits. Prerequisite: 
Quantitative Analysis I. 

This consists of the gravimetric and volumetric determinations of 
phosphorus; the use of oxidizing solutions in volumetric analysis; the 
determination of iron in an ore; and the determination of potassium and 
carbon dioxide. Students expecting to take this course should plan to 
take it immediately after completing the work in Quantitative Analysis 
II. Laboratory guide, Notes on Quantitative Chemical Analysis, by C. W. 
Foulk. 

10. — Quantitative Analysis IV. Graduate or elective, senior year, 
fall, winter, or spring term. For each two hours' work a week for one 
term, one credit. Prerequisite: Quantitative Analysis III. 

In this course the student may specialize on the analysis of foods, 
feeding stuffs, soils, fertilizers, or dairy products. As far as the student's 
preparation allows, he may take up the chemical study of a special prob- 
lem. This applies particularly to graduate students. 

11. — Chemistry C. Sophomore year, winter term. Lecture, one hour; 
laboratory, eight hours. Five credits. Required in the course in civil 
engineering. Prerequisite: Chemistry III. 

This course is designed to give students of civil engineering as much 
training in qualitative and quantitative analysis as time permits, the 
special direction given to the work being such as to lead to the greatest 
amount of practical benefit. Texts, W. A. Noyes' Qualitative Analysis* 
and Lincoln and Walton's Quantitative Analysis, supplemented by pam- 
phlets and mimeographed matter. 

12. — Chemistry D-L Junior year, fall term. Laboratory, four hours. 
Two credits. For students specializing in dairy husbandry. Prerequisite: 
Quantitative Analysis I. 

This course includes calibration of volumetric apparatus, preparation 
of standard acid and alkali solutions of definite normality, and analysis 
of milk and butter. Laboratory guide, Lincoln and Walton's Elementary 
Quantitative Analysis, supplemented by special directions. 

13. — Chemistry D-IL Junior year, winter term. Laboratory, four, 
hours. Two credits. For students specializing in dairy husbandry. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry D-L 

The course comprises determination of volatile fatty acids, of soluble 
and insoluble acids, saponification and iodine number of butter fat. 
These constants are determined on other fats also, as far as time permits. 

14. — Household Chemistry. Senior year, fall term. Class work, one 
hour; laboratory, six hours. Four credits. Required in the course in 
home economics. Prerequisites: Qualitative Analysis and Elementary 
Organic Chemistry. 

This course is designed to give the women in the home-economics course 
qualitative and quantitative work in the chemistry of the materials most 
intimately related to their daily life. Air, water, foods, fuel, fabrics, dis- 
infectants, metals, and other materials used in and about the home are 
the subjects of numerous experiments touching their properties, useful- 
ness and defects. 

15. — Human Nutrition. Junior year, fall term or winter term. Class. 
work, four hours. Four credits. Required in the course in home eco- 
nomics; elective in the course in general science. 



Division of General Science 241 

This is a course in the chemistry of foods and nutrition, and includes, 
among others, the following topics: the composition of the body; the 
composition of foods and methods of investigation employed in their 
study; the changes that the several classes of foods undergo in cooking 
and digestion, and the functions that they perform in nutrition; daily 
food requirements, and the balancing of dietaries; food economy. Chem- 
istry of Food and Nutrition, by H. C. Sherman, is used as a textbook, but 
is supplemented by lectures. Elementary Organic Chemistry and Physi- 
ology must precede this course. 

16. — Principles of Animal Nutrition. Graduate or elective, spring 
term. Class work, four hours. Four credits. Prerequisite: Elementary 
Organic Chemistry. 

This course gives a thorough study of the relations of animals to 
matter and energy. The methods of research and the results obtained 
are treated in an extended and scientific manner. Text, Principles of 
Nutrition, by H. P. Armsby. 

17-19. — Inorganic Chemistry I, II, and III. Graduate or elective; 
junior or senior year; fall, winter, and spring terms. Given in 1914-'15 
and alternate years thereafter. Class work, three hours ; laboratory, four 
hours. Five credits each term. Prerequisite: Qualitative Analysis. 

This course consists of a thorough study of the facts of chemistry and 
their theoretical interpretation according to the views of the present day. 
Text, Modern Inorganic Chemistry, by J. W. Mellor. 

20-22. — Industrial Chemistry I, II and III. Graduate or elective; 
junior or senior year; fall, winter and spring terms, alternate years. Not 
given in 1914-'15. Class work, three hours; laboratory, six hours. Six 
credits each term. Prerequisite: Elementary Organic Chemistry. 

This course consists of three hours a week of lectures and recitations 
in each term upon the more important technical chemical processes. 
Considerable attention is given to general operations, and the machinery 
employed. The more important commercial manufacturing industries are 
then taken up, including, with others, the production of alkalies, acids, 
glass, clay products, cement, paint, pigments, oils, varnish, soap, gas, 
paper, leather, petroleum, sugars, starch, and the products of fermenta- 
tion, and the destructive distillation of wood and coal. Textbook, Indus- 
trial Chemistry for the Student and Manufacturer, by Rogers and Aubert. 

23-25. — Organic Chemistry I, II, and III. Graduate or elective; 
junior or senior year; fall, winter, and spring terms. Given in 1914-'15 
and alternate years thereafter. Class work, three hours; laboratory, four 
hours. Five credits each term. 

The course includes a careful, systematic study of the aliphatic and 
aromatic compounds to such an extent as the time permits. Text, Theo- 
retical Organic Chemistry, by Cohen. 

26-27, — Physiological Chemistry I, II, and III. Graduate or elec- 
tive; junior or senior year. Given in 1913- , 14 and alternate years there- 
after. Class work, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits each 
term. Prerequisite: Elementary Organic Chemistry. 

A systematic and thorough study of the synthetic and analytical chem- 
ical changes that accompany the physiological processes of animals and 
plants. The chemical properties of food and body substances and their 
general and specific functions; the changes that take place in digestion, 
assimilation, and elimination, and the means by which these are brought 
about; enzymes and their functions; the blood and lymph; general 
metabolism and the interrelations of organs are among the important 
topics studied. Textbook, Abderhalden's Text-Book of Physiological 
Chemistry. Laboratory guide, Hawk's Practical Physiological Chemistry, 



242 Kansas State Agricultural College 

28. — Journal Meeting. Once a week, throughout the year, the officers 
of the department, with the more advanced students and such others as 
wish to, meet for papers and discussion upon topics representing the 
progress of chemical science, chiefly as found in the current journals. 
The preparation of subjects for presentation at these meetings may be 
made a part of the credit work of advanced students. 



Economics 

Professor Kammeyer 
Assistant Professor Baker 

Vocational training alone does not fully prepare a student for his life's 
work, nor for the acceptable discharge of his duties as a citizen. It is 
necessary that he should have at least a general knowledge of the social 
and economic conditions under which he works, in order that he may 
benefit society as well as himself. The State needs men and women trained 
for citizenship, and it is the purpose of this department to plan and to 
direct its work with this need in view. 

A departmental library of well-selected books bearing on economics, 
sociology, and statistics is at the disposal of students, and is used for 
collateral readings, book reviews, and reports. 

COUESES IN ECONOMICS. 

1. — Economics. Sophomore, junior or senior year, fall and spring 
terms. Class work, four hours. Four credits. Required in all courses 
■except veterinary medicine. 

A study of economic principles underlying the phenomena of wealth 
production, consumption, exchange, and distribution, including a general 
•survey of the State in its relation to industry, transportation, public 
utilities, insurance, socialism, etc. Instruction by recitations and lec- 
tures. Text, Ely's Outlines of Economics. 

2. — Business Organization. Junior or senior year, winter or spring 
term. Class work, two hours. Two credits. Required in courses in the 
Division of Mechanic Arts ; elective in the course in general science. Pre- 
requisite: Economics. 

A study of individual proprietorship, partnership and corporation as 
forms of business organization and management; the advantages and 
■disadvantages of each, and legislative restrictions. The selling plans, 
advertising methods and systems of credits and collections used by typical 
manufacturing and distributive industries are made the basis of study 
and reports. Attention is given also to the origin and operation of 
markets and exchanges, cost accounting, and special systems of wage 
payment. Instruction is by recitations, lectures, and reports. 

3. — Agricultural Economics. Senior year, winter term. Class work, 
four hours a week. Four credits. Optional in the course in agriculture. 

This course is intended especially for students pursuing one of the 
agricultural courses, and in the main is similar to Economics, with the 
distinction that more time and emphasis are given to such subjects as 
rent, size of farms, ownership and tenancy, transportation to markets, 
agricultural credit associations, farm labor, and agricultural problems of 
an educational and social character. Instruction by recitations, lectures, 
and reports. Text, Carver's Rural Economics. 

4. — History of Economic Thought. Elective, fall term. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in general science. 
A study of the origin and development of economic ideas prior to the 



Division of General Science 243 

time of Adam Smith, and of systems of economic thought subsequent to 
that time. The course is designed to supplement course 1 in economics, 
and the aim is to deepen the insight and broaden the view of the student 
touching existing economic phenomena and conditions, their origin, logical 
development and interrelations. Haney's The History of Economic- 
Thought is used as a manual, but lectures, assigned readings and reports 
are the chief basis of instruction. 

5. — Labor Problems. Elective, winter term. Class work, two hours. 
Two credits. Elective in the course in general science. Must be pre- 
ceded by a course in general economics. 

The history, organization, functions and legal status of labor unions 
in the United States and the principal countries of Europe. Statistics: 
and judicial decisions relating to strikes, boycotts, picketing, arbitration,, 
etc., are subjects of study and investigation. The course also includes 
a study of the various plans that have been proposed and tried for the 
more equitable distribution of wealth, such as profit-sharing, cooperation, 
industrial partnership, etc. Instruction by lectures, assigned readings,, 
and reports. 

6. — Money and Banking. Elective, spring term. Class work, two- 
hours. Two credits. Elective in the course in general science. 

A study in detail of money, its history and characteristics as a medium 
of exchange and standard of value. Bank currency: its nature, forma 
and limitations. The principal banking systems of the world, their 
machinery and methods; branch banks, clearing houses, foreign and do- 
mestic exchange, etc. Special attention is given to the defects and needs, 
of our own banking system, and to proposed plans for reorganization* 
A manual such as Scott's or White's Money and Banking is used, supple- 
mented by lectures and library work. 

7. — Public Finance. Elective, spring term. Class work, two hours.. 
Two credits. Elective in the course in general science. 

This course embraces a study of public revenues and public expendi- 
tures; the development of tax systems, reforms needed, public indebted- 
ness, budgets, and other phenomena of financial administration. A 
manual such as Plehn's Introduction to Public Finance is used as a basis; 
for recitations. This is supplemented by library work and reports.. 
Must be preceded by a course in general economics. 



Education 

Professor Holton 
Associate Professor Kent 
Assistant Professor Bbisstbb 

The courses in this department have for their controlling purpose the 
professional training of teachers. Two types of courses are offered: 
(1) Courses that give the broad, fundamental principles upon which 
public education is based, and (2) courses that develop technique and 
skill in school management and the organization of the subject matter of 
the curriculum. All courses are based upon the proposition that educa- 
tion supported by public taxation should function in social and vocational 
efficiency. 

A minimum of twenty-four credit hours is required in this department 
for the state teacher's certificate. 



244 Kansas State Agricultural College 

COURSES IN EDUCATION 

1. — Psychology. Junior or senior year, fall, winter or spring term. 
Class work, four hours. Four credits. Required for state teacher's cer- 
tificate. 

General introduction to the forms and laws of conscious experience as 
based on a knowledge of the physiological conditions of mental life. The 
work of the course will include the study of a text, outside readings, lec- 
tures and class experiments. Textbook, Pillsbury's Essentials of Psy- 
chology, 

2. — History of Education. Junior or senior year, fall or winter term. 
Class work, four hours. Four credits. Required for state teacher's cer- 
tificate. 

This course is intended to present the successive relationships that 
have existed between educational machinery and practices, and the chang- 
ing political, economic, scientific, cultural and ideal environments from 
primitive times to the present. Textbook, Monroe's Brief Course in the 
History of Education. 

3. — Principles of Education. Junior or senior year, fall, winter or 
spring term. Class work, four hours. Four credits. Required for state 
teacher's certificate. 

Taking the purpose of education to be the preparation of the child for 
efficient participation in the life of society, the course aims at presenting 
the biological, psychological, economic, cultural and moral aspects of the 
educative process. Textbook, Reudiger's Principles of Education, 

4. — Teaching Method. Junior or senior year, winter or spring term. 
Class work, four hours. Four credits. Required for state teacher's cer- 
tificate. 

The aim of this course willbe the development of good classroom tech- 
nique through detailed study of child experiences as related to the larger 
demands of education. The work will include lectures, library assign- 
ments and observation of classes. A feature of the course will be indi- 
vidual reports and discussions. Prerequisites : General Psychology ; 
Principles of Education. 

5.- — Educational Psychology. Junior or senior year, spring term. 
Class work, four hours. Four credits. Elective for state teacher's cer- 
tificate. 

The course will deal with those aspects of psychology that have a 
direct bearing upon educational practices. Special attention will be paid 
to the results of experimental investigations, in this field. Lectures and 
library work. Prerequisites: General Psychology; Principles of Educa- 
tion. 

6. — School Hygiene. Junior or senior year, winter or spring term. 
Class work, two hours. Two credits. Elective for state teacher's cer- 
tificate. 

The course includes a study of the school plant and equipment from 
the viewpoint of the mental and physical hygiene of the child ; the stand- 
ard tests for revealing the mental and physical defects of school "children ; 
the Simon-Binet test for mental measurements; school diseases and pre- 
ventive measures. 

7. — School Administration. Junior or senior year, fall, winter, or 
spring term. Class work, four hours. Four credits. Required for state 
teacher's certificate. 

This course is a study of the organization of state, city and county 
school systems, with special emphasis upon the rural and vocational 
schools; the interrelation of boards of education, superintendent, prin- 
cipal, and teachers. The school law of Kansas is also studied. 



Division of General Science 245 

8. — Practice Teaching. Senior «year, fall, winter, or spring term. 
Two hours. One credit. Required for state teacher's certificate. 

Each candidate for a teacher's certificate is required to teach one hour 
a week for one term in the School of Agriculture; preparation and pres- 
entation of the subject matter of the curriculum are discussed. 

9. — Agricultural Education. Senior year, fall, winter, or spring 
term. Class work, two hours. Two credits. Required of all candidates 
for state teacher's certificate who are preparing to teach agriculture. 

This course is a study of typical secondary schools of agriculture and 
departments of agriculture in public schools; of land-grant colleges; of 
the making of a course of study in agriculture for elementary and sec- 
ondary schools; of laboratory supplies and equipment; of the pedagogy 
of vocational subjects. 

10. — Industrial Education. Senior year, fall, winter, or spring 
term. Class work, two hours. Two credits. Required of all candidates 
for state teacher's certificate who are preparing to teach manual train- 
ing, shop work, trade courses, and other industrial subjects. 

This course is a study of typical secondary schools of industrial educa- 
tion and departments of industrial education in public schools; of the 
industrial schools of Germany; of the making of a course of study in 
industrial education for elementary and secondary schools ; of shop equip- 
ment and cost ; of the pedagogy of vocational subjects. 

11. — Home Economics Education. Senior year, fall, winter, or spring 
term. Class work, two hours. Two credits. Required of all candidates 
for state teacher's certificate who are preparing to teach home economics. 
See Division of Home Economics. 

12. — Rural Education. Junior and senior year, fall, winter, or spring 
term. Class work, four hours. Four credits. Elective for state teacher's 
certificate. 

This is a course on the subject matter and methods employed in rural 
and agricultural education. An outline syllabus of the course is as fol- 
lows: The development of agricultural education; agricultural colleges; 
ecoles pratiques d'agriculture in France; Folkehojskoler in Denmark; 
agricultural schools in Wisconsin, Massachusetts, and other states ; 
school gardens; organization of the course of study. for rural high. schools; 
extension service; rural schools and community service; district, town- 
ship and county as units of school organization; consolidation of rural 
schools. 

13. — Educational Seminar. . Senior or graduate students, fall, winter, 
or spring term. One double period a week. The number of credits de- 
pends upon the time given to investigation and- the quality of the work. 
Elective. 

This course consists of research in rural and vocational education. 



243 Kansas State Agricultural College 



The English Language 

Professor Searson 
Assistant Professor Ostrum 
Assistant Professor Crawford 
Instructor Rios 
Instructor Boot 
Instructor Leonard 
Instructor Davis 
Instructor Syford 
Instructor Winship 

Ability to use language accurately, clearly and concisely is an essential 
part of the training of every educated person. The work of the Depart- 
ment of the English Language is to acquaint the student with the best 
standards of English practice, and to encourage him to maintain these 
standards in all his work. To this end the department offers studies in 
cultural and technical English and special drills in expressing thought 
freely and effectively in matters touching the vital interests of the 
student. The study of the English language is thus made the means of 
increasing the power and efficiency, and consequently the capacity for 
enjoyment, of the individual. It is the aim of the department, in co- 
operation with the technical departments of the College, to increase the 
knowledge and usefulness of the young workers of the State; 

COURSES IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

1. — English I. Freshman year, each term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. Required in all courses. Prerequisite: Graduation from 
a fully accredited high school, with three units in English, or the 
equivalent. 

During the first week of the course, the student is given a series 
of classroom exercises to test his fitness to pursue the work of the course. 
Following these exercises, the student is given a rapid, thorough review 
of the essentials of English, followed by essays on simple themes designed 
to develop his ability to tell accurately and interestingly what he knows 
and to describe creditably what he sees. The chief object of the course 
is to enable the student to use clear-cut, correct English, to express his 
thoughts readily, accurately, and precisely on topics of vital human in- 
terest. Special consultations are held with all students, and special 
supplementary drills are given to all who need additional help. 

2. — English II. Freshman year, each term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. Required in all courses. Prerequisite: English I. 

This course is a continuation of English I. In addition to continuing 
accurate drills, careful attention will be given to the making of plans, 
outlines, and abstracts, and to the proper construction of paragraphs 
and themes. So far as possible, the student will be shown how to get the 
most from the lecture or from th« printed page, and will be trained 
to take notes properly. To give a natural incentive to proper oral and 
written expression, the fields of agriculture and country life, engineering, 
home economics, applied science, sociology, psychology and general eco- 
nomics are explored freely for topics of keen interest. The course is con- 
ducted with the central idea of assisting the freshman to acquire the 
habit of clear, accurate thought-getting and thought-expression in all 
his technical work. 

3. — College Rhetoric I. Freshman or sophomore year, each term. 
Class work, four hours. Four credits. Required in all except the engi- 
neering courses. Prerequisite: English II. 



Division of General Science 2A1 

This course is a continuation of the work in English II. It includes 
a brief review of the essentials taught in English I and English II. In 
addition, special work in outlining, practical work in abstracting, di- 
rected library investigations, references and bibliography work, are re- 
quired in order to assist each student to write and to speak effectively 
along the line of his own special interests and needs. Special drills 
in readiness and flexibility of thought-expression will be given by re- 
quiring a great deal of extemporaneous writing in the classroom. So 
far as possible, the work will be so arranged as to adapt itself to the 
special needs of the students of the several divisions. 

4. — College Rhetoric II. Sophomore year, each term; junior or 
senior year, fall term. Class work, four hours. Pour credits. One 
term's work required in all except the engineering courses. Prerequisite : 
College Rhetoric I. 

This course includes a brief review of the essentials of thought- 
expression, library investigation, bibliography work, logical arguments 
and orations. In addition, class reports upon projected engineering 
enterprises, explanations of mechanical and chemical processes, descrip- 
tions of new inventions by means of drawings and diagrams, special 
reports of significant agricultural experiments, and practical discussions 
of problems in home economics, are required. Attention is also directed 
toward the accurate and effective use of English in business letters, 
applications, shop reports, specifications, contracts, and bulletins. The 
work is adapted to meet the special needs of the students of the 
several college divisions. 

5. — Special English. This course is offered each term as supple- 
mentary to the courses in the School of Agriculture and in freshman 
English, and may be required of any student whose written work shows 
that he is unable to express his ideas clearly and accurately. Students 
may be admitted to the course by the head of the Department of the 
English Language upon the recommendation of the instructor and the 
student's dean. The course consists of special exercises, helps, and con- 
sultations, and may be continued in each case as long as is necessary to 
give the student the assistance needed. 

6. — Argumentation and Debate. Elective, fall term. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. Elective in the courses in home economics, 
agriculture, and general science. Prerequisite : College Rhetoric I. 

This course includes a systematic study of the theory of debate; brief - 
making; classroom practice in debating, in defending propositions, and 
in extemporaneous speaking; the proper methods of collecting and classi- 
fying material, and effective methods of refuting arguments. Special 
help is given to those desiring to participate in intercollegiate debates. 
Consultations, library investigations and special group conferences form 
helpful laboratory features of the course. 

7. — Bible English. Elective, fall term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. Elective in the courses in agriculture, home economics, 
and general science. Prerequisite: College Rhetoric I. 

This course comprises a study of simple, forceful English based on 
Bible models. Short illustrative extracts, typical short stories, descrip- 
tions, clear explanations, and effective arguments are studied carefully to 
discover the secrets of simplicity, clearness and power of that great 
classic. 

8. — English Practice. Elective, winter term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Elective in the courses in home economics, agri- 
culture, and general science. Prerequisite: College Rhetoric I. 

This course offers advanced work in correct English practice. Defi- 
nite work is assigned in practical, everyday English. The object of 
the course is to afford students special advanced training in the use 



248 Kansas State Agricultural College 

of English. The course is specially planned to meet the needs of those 
who intend to teach English, and of those who desire to record the 
results of technical investigations in the most effective form. Work done 
in other departments may be used as a basis of a part of the laboratory 
practice of this course. Regular conferences and consultations offer the 
student an opportunity to secure systematic personal help. 

9. — Farm and Home English. Elective, winter term. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. Elective in the courses in agriculture, home 
economics, and general science. Prerequisite: College Rhetoric I. 

This course is designed primarily to teach the plain, practical English 
indispensable to farm men and women who, by reason of special prepara- 
tion for their work, expect to become leaders. This is a practice course 
in the essentials of useful, technical English, letter writing, farm reading 
and writing, and farm and club writing and speaking. 

10. — Business English. Elective, spring term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Elective in the courses in agriculture, home eco- 
nomics, and general science. Prerequisite: College Rhetoric I. 

This course comprises a thorough review of business letter-writing, 
exercises in writing contracts, notes, mortgages, wills, orders, sale bills, 
specifications, model story advertisements of farm produce, and a prac- 
tice study of other forms commonly used in connection with the business 
of farm and home. 

11. — Applied English. Elective, spring term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. Elective in the courses in home economics, agriculture, 
and general science. Prerequisite: College Rhetoric I. 

This course is a continuation of the one in English practice, and in- 
cludes a study of correct standards and usage as applied in all branches 
of ordinary technical research. Definite assignments, carefully directed 
practice and advanced drills, and group studies showing the identity of 
higher theory and practice in English, are special features of the course. 
A series of the best texts will be used as the reference basis of the 
course. 

12. — Farm Advertising. Elective, fall term. Class work and practice, 
three hours. Three credits. Elective in the courses in home economics, 
agriculture, and general science. Prerequisite: College Rhetoric I. 

How to advertise all kinds of farm produce in order to secure regular 
customers by parcel post or by direct delivery, is the object of this course. 
The student is shown how to write the most effective copy for "display 
ads.," "story ads.," and handbills, and how to feature the central point in 
each advertisement. The course includes the collection of the most 
important facts concerning farm produce and such study of markets and 
marketing as is necessary. 

13. — Farm Stories. Elective, winter term. Class work, three hours. 
Three credits. Elective in the courses in agriculture, home economics, 
and general science. Prerequisite: College Rhetoric I. 

This course is designed to teach the student how to get the facts for a 
good farm "story" and how to write effective human-interest "stories" of 
farm life. Every phase of farm life is considered with the purpose of 
developing in the student the power to recognize the material for a good 
"story" and to write the "story" with vivid, effective appeal. The student 
is given extensive practice in setting forth the most interesting facts and 
incidents connected with farm life. 

" 14. — Farm Bulletins. Elective, spring term. Class work, three 
hours. Three credits. Elective in the courses in agriculture, home 
economics, and general science. Prerequisite: College Rhetoric I. 

In this course the student is required to make an extensive study of 
farm bulletins and the essentials of writing good bulletins. How to write 



Division of General Science 2A§ 

in a simple, direct style that appeals to the readers for whom the bulletin 
is intended, is the subject of careful study. Current farm bulletins is 
made the basis for thorough drills in this special line. The student is 
permitted to take the facts he has collected in connection with the work 
of other classes and to use them in working out special reports required 
in this course. The course is designed especially for those who intend 
later to write clear-cut, practical, and effective farm bulletins. 

15. — Applications. Elective, spring term. Class work, one hour. 
One credit. Elective in the courses in agriculture, home economics, and 
general science. Prerequisite: College Rhetoric I. 

This is a practice course designed to assist the seniors in the various 
courses in the College to write effective letters of application. The 
proper forms for letters of application for positions in the fields of in- 
dustry will be taught the student in special practice drills. 

16. — Home Economics English. Elective, fall term. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. Elective in the housekeepers' course in home 
economics. 

This is a study and conference course which will be varied to suit the 
needs of women in the housekeepers' course. 



English Literature 

Professor Brink 
Assistant Professor Good 

An ultimate purpose of the instruction in literature is to train stu- 
dents in the art of effective writing. No better way has yet been found 
for the accomplishment of such an end than the study and emulation of 
the great writers of the language. The courses seek to give the student 
an understanding of the nature and characteristics of literature in its 
leading forms, to develop in him a taste for noble expression and a 
desire to attain high ideals in his own writings, to develop in him the 
ability to judge with confidence the literary qualities of any given work, 
and through sympathetic study of masterpieces to give him some idea of 
the leading authors. 

In most of the courses in literature the work is pursued by means of a 
combination of lectures, classroom study, and seminary investigation, 
accompanied, of course, by frequent written reports for criticism and dis- 
cussion. The literature is read at first hand, and the student is required 
to interpret for himself as far as possible, with the idea that it is more 
profitable for him to know an author than to know what some one has 
said about that author. The extensive and intensive methods are com- 
bined — wide reading to obtain literary atmosphere and breadth of view; 
■critical study to develop accuracy and insight. 

COURSES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE 

1. — English Literature. Sophomore year, winter or spring term. 
Four hours a week. Four credits. Required in the courses in the Division 
•of Mechanic Arts. Prerequisite: College Rhetoric I. 

This course gives a brief review of the rise and development of English 
literature, with library study of periods and typical authors. Lectures 
are given on the nature of literature; the nature of poetry; linguistic and 
race contributions to the literature; the great literary periods. The work 
includes class study, reports, and the study of masterpieces. 



250 Kansas State Agricultural College 

2. — English Literature I. Sophomore or junior year, winter term. 
Four hours a week. Four credits. Required in the courses in industrial 
journalism, general science, and home economics; elective in other 
courses. Prerequisite: College Rhetoric I. 

This course comprises an outline of the history of the language and 
literature. The students are required to prepare dissertations, both oral 
and written, on periods and types of literature, on representative writers, 
and on significant movements. Lectures are delivered on the following 
subjects: What is Literature? What is Poetry? Forms of Poetry; 
Criticism; The Beginnings of English Fiction; The Age of Scott, Burns, 
and Wordsworth; Tennyson and His Age. Members of the class report 
the lectures and apply principles in the actual study of suitable selections. 
The class carries on extensive study of such writers as Shakespeare and 
Thackeray out of class, and intensive study of somewhat difficult poetical 
selections in class, with reports and informal discussions. 

3. — English Literature II. Sophomore or junior year, spring term. 
Four hours a week. Four credits. Required in the courses in industrial 
journalism, general science, and home economics. Prerequisite: English 
Literature I. 

This is a continuation of English Literature I. The work includes: 
some plays of Shakespeare by the seminar method; reports and discus- 
sions; principles of Shakespearian criticism; linguistic elements and ten- 
dencies of the Lowland Scotch, with illustrations from the poetry of 
Burns. Critical study is made of typical productions of such writers as 
Shelley, Burns, Thackeray, Tennyson, Browning. The principles of 
Browning criticism are taken up. 

4. — Studies in Oratory. Elective,, fall term. Four hours a week. 
Four credits. Elective in courses that offer electives. Prerequisite: 
College Rhetoric I. 

This course is a study of that type of oral discourse the ultimate pur- 
pose of which is to move the determination of hearers. The distinctions 
between spoken and written discourse are especially emphasized. The 
class examines and analyzes as many great speeches, especially of mod- 
ern orators, as the time will permit. The course further includes the 
logic of oratory; study of oratorical style; and practice in the writing 
of speeches with a view to effective and persuasive utterance. Text, 
Brink's The Making of an Oration, 

5. — The English Drama. Elective, winter term. Four hours a week. 
Four credits. Elective in courses that offer electives. Prerequisite: Col- 
lege Rhetoric I. 

This is a study of the nature of the romantic, as distinguished from the 
classical, school of this great type of literature. The course is devoted 
mainly to Shakespeare, with reports and informal lectures on the drama 
before his time, and the reading of one or two plays of the subsequent 
period. The seminar method mainly is employed. The technique of the 
drama is studied, including character analysis, thought interpretation, 
and plot development. 

6. — The English Novel. Elective, winter term. Four hours a week. 
Four credits. Elective in courses that offer electives. Prerequisite: Col- 
lege Rhetoric I. 

This course is a study of the beginnings and development of this order 
of fiction; the laws of its art; its leading types, including the society 
novel, the historical novel, the novel with a purpose, the psychological 
novel, etc.; how to judge a novel. As many books as time will permit are 
read from typical authors, such as Jane Austen, Lytton, Scott, Dickens, 
Thackeray, Eliot, Charles Reade and others. The scientific method is 
followed, and the aim is to make the course as useful as possible to all 
who read novels and wish to make such reading profitable as well as 
interesting. 



Division of General Science 251 

7. — Nineteenth Century Literature. Elective, spring term. Four 
hours a week. Pour credits. Elective in courses that offer electives. 
Prerequisite: College Rhetoric I. 

This course is a study of the great writers of the Victorian period. 
Some attention is given to the Romantic Revival in English poetry, but 
most of the time is devoted to a first-hand study of Carlyle, Tennyson, 
Wordsworth, Browning, Shelley, and other writers of the period, who 
•either expressed the life of their time or were leaders in shaping the life 
of their own or of subsequent years. 

8. — American ^ Literature. Elective, spring term. Four hours a 
week. Four credits. Elective in courses that offer electives. Prerequi- 
site: College Rhetoric. 

A rapid survey is made of the rise and development of American 
authorship from colonial times to our own day, with study of the lives, 
and criticism of the works, of representative men of letters, and intensive 
reading of their works so far as the time will permit. The transcendental 
movement and the Brook Farm experiment are considered. Seminar 
study is made of some of the great novels, longer poems, and speeches. 
The course includes Emerson's essays and poems. 

9. — Literature and Labor. Elective, spring term. Four hours a 
week. Four credits. Elective in all courses that offer electives. Pre- 
requisite: College Rhetoric. 

This course is arranged in recognition of the fact that much of the lit- 
erature of the world is intimately related, either as cause or effect, to the 
work and progress of the race, and therefore to the heart of laboring 
man. It attempts, through the study of representative productions, to 
unfold this relation of literature to labor. 



Entomology 

Professor Dean 
Instructor MoColloch 
Instructor Merrill 
Assistant Welch 

In all courses a special effort is made to make the student realize that 
"he is studying living things which form a part of his daily environment, 
.and upon which his welfare in many cases vitally depends. In courses 
in which both class and laboratory instruction is given, the closest cor- 
relation is striven for, and wherever possible the same form is studied 
simultaneously in laboratory and class. The student is led to integrate 
"his classroom knowledge with local animal life by means of frequent and 
carefully planned field excursions, and by the free use of vivaria in lab- 
oratory and museum. The courses offered are intended to awaken in the 
student a keen appreciation of the general principles underlying insect 
life, of the life economy of the more beneficial as well as of the more in- 
jurious species, and of the general principles governing methods for their 
•control. 

Standard anatomical charts, a representative collection (especially of 
local species), a high-grade lantern for the projection of lantern and 
microscope slides, a large and excellent series of lantern slides (many of 
them colored) , and a series of microscope slides are available for illustra- 
tion. (The lantern is used also for zoology and geology.) Compound and 
dissecting microscopes sufficient for the needs of laboratory classes have 
been provided. 



252 Kansas State Agricultural College 

COURSES IN ENTOMOLOGY 

1. — General Entomology. Junior year, spring term. Class work,, 
three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Required in the agri- 
cultural courses. Prerequisites: General Zoology I and II. 

This is a study of the elementary anatomy and physiology of insects, 
complete enough to give a thorough understanding of the life history 
and habits of the most important species and the general principles upon 
which the control of these economic forms is based. It is a study of the 
more important general facts about insects as a class; the main characters 
of the different orders and groups; how they have fitted themselves to 
survive and multiply; and how the structure and habits of one group 
render it susceptible to certain measures of control, while in other groups 
entirely different measures are necessary. The class work consists of 
lectures and of text and special reference study. 

2. — Insect Morphology. Senior year, fall term. Class work, one 
hour; laboratory, six hours. Four credits. Elective in the courses in 
agriculture and general science. Prerequisite: General Entomology. 

This is a study of the external anatomy of insects belonging to all the 
larger and more important orders and of the internal anatomy of one or 
two types. 

3. — Horticultural Entomology. Senior year, winter term. Class 
work, two hours. Two credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. 
Prerequisite: General Entomology. 

This is a study of the most important insect pests of orchard, garden, 
and forest, and of standard methods for controlling their ravages. The 
class work consists of lectures and the study of references. 

4. — Household Entomology. Senior year, winter term. Class work,, 
two hours. Two credits. Required in the course in home economics. 
Prerequisites: General Zoology I and II. 

This is a study of the elementary structure and physiology of insects 
complete enough to give a clear understanding of the life history, habits 
and methods of control of the principal insects injurious to house, garden, 
lawn, and human health. The course consists of reference study and a 
series of lectures. 

5. — Taxonomy of Insects. Elective, winter term. Laboratory, eight 
hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in general science. Pre- 
requisites: General Entomology and Insect Morphology. 

This is a study of the general principles of the classification of repre- 
sentative insect forms. The purpose of this course is so to familiarize the 
student with the literature, methods, and ideals of classification that he 
will be able expeditiously to identify forms unknown to him and to pursue 
advanced taxonomic studies. 

6. — General Economic Entomology. Elective, spring term. Class 
work, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Elective in the 
course in general science. 

This is a study of the life economy of the more important economic 
insects, of methods to be used in dealing with them, and of the literature 
of economic entomology. The student is made familiar with our present 
knowledge of the most important of our injurious insects, with the sources 
of economic literature, and with methods commonly used in the investiga- 
tion of problems in economic entomology. The class work consists of 
lectures, and of text and special reference reading. Prerequisite: Gen- 
eral Entomology. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work consists of the formation and study 
of a collection of injurious insects, and in insect breeding. This work 
naturally involves much field study, in the course of which the student 
gains a first-hand acquaintance with the more important injurious insects 
at home in nature. 



Division of General Science 253 

7. — Advanced General Entomology. Graduate and elective, spring 
term. Four credits. The class work consists of lectures and assigned 
reading, together with demonstrations and field work. Elective in the 
courses in general science and agriculture. Prerequisite: General En- 
tomology. 

The purpose of this course is to give the advanced student a compre- 
hensive view of the broad biological aspect of the subject and an under- 
standing of the relation of insects to the complex of environmental fac- 
tors. The various subdivisions of entomology will be correlated and used 
as a basis in the presentation of general principles as well as illustrating 
the problems of maintenance and the various ways in which insects have 
solved them. _ The course will include a somewhat detailed consideration 
of the following: anatomy as the basis for physiological considerations, 
embryology of insects, aquatic insects and their special adaptations, color 
and coloration, origin of adaptations, insects in relation to plants, to 
other animals, and to other insects, insects in relation to transmission of 
disease, insect behavior, geographical distribution, and geological distri- 
bution. 

8. — Milling Entomology. Elective, spring term. Class work, two 
hours. Two credits. Required in the course in milling engineering, 
elective in the courses in general science and agriculture. Prerequisite: 
General Entomology. 

This is a study of the insect pests of flour mills, elevators, granaries, 
warehouses and bakeries, and of the standard methods to be used in 
dealing with them. The course consists of lectures and special reference 
reading. Inspection trips will be made to flour mills and warehouses. 

9. — Research in Entomology. The special student approaching grad- 
uation, if willing and capable, is drawn into the research work of the 
Experiment Station during the summer vacation, and during his last 
school year is encouraged to undertake the solution of a problem of his 
own. By this means his information is integrated with the practical prob- 
lems which he must later meet. Prerequisites : General Entomology, and 
General Economic Entomology. 



Geology 

Professor Naboites 
Assistant Professor Newman 

By use of abundant illustrative material, a special effort is made to 
make the student realize that he is dealing with natural forces which 
intimately affect his own well-being and that of his fellows. So far 
as conditions permit, the agencies that have made the earth what it is 
are observed and studied in the field. The purpose of these courses is 
to arouse in the student an appreciation of the general principles under- 
lying the structure and formation of the earth. 

Some charts, a large and excellent series of lantern slides, a repre- 
sentative collection of fossils and minerals, and a surrounding country 
exhibiting considerable variety of hill and valley, are available for 
illustrative purposes. 



254 Kansas State Agricultural College 

COURSES IN GEOLOGY 

1. — General Geology. Junior year, fall of spring term. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. Required in the course in agriculture; elec- 
tive in the course in general science. 

This course consists of a brief study of the underlying principles of 
structural, dynamic and historical geology. The class work consists of 
lectures, and of a study of a text and references. : 

2. — Engineering Geology. Junior year, spring term. Class work, 
four hours ; laboratory, four hours. Six credits. Required in the course 
in civil engineering. 

The class work in this subject consists in a study of the general prin- 
ciples of structural and dynamic geology, and of rocks in respect to their 
mineral composition, structural properties, changes in weathering, etc. 
It is given by lectures, textbook and references. Text, Geology for 
Engineers, by R. F. Sorsbie. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work comprises the observation and de- 
scription of such structural and dynamic features as the locality affords, 
and a study of the principal rocks, and their mineral constituents. 



German 

Professor Cobtelyou 
Instructor Hbilman 
Instructor Limpeb 

In whatever direction the modern student turns his energies, a prac- 
tical knowledge of German is found to be very useful — often quite in- 
dispensable. In the sciences, in the arts, and in literature, much of the 
newest and best work appears in German, so that he who would keep 
abreast of the times is forced to acquire at least the rudiments of the 
language. It is desired that the work of this department shall be as 
practical as possible, without, however, failing to encourage a fondness 
for German literature. The plan of instruction in general is a combina- 
tion of the grammatical and conversational methods, each of which has 
its own special advantages. 

A number of literary and scientific periodicals published in German 
are received by the College library, and afford the student a practical 
opportunity to amplify his knowledge of the language as derived in the 
classroom. 

Students who have had German in the high school will be required, as 
a rule, to take more advanced courses as their elective or required work 
in German here. 

COURSES IN GERMAN 

1. — Elementary German I. Sophomore year, fall or winter term. 
Class work, four hours. Four credits. Required in the course in home 
economics; elective in other courses. 

After two periods given to the acquisition of the sounds of the 
German letters, the student at once begins reading. Vocabularies are 
learned from the outset, while grammar is acquired gradually through 
reading. Oral and written work and simple conversational exercises 
begin with the first reading lesson. In the work of this term there is 
included the study of articles, prepositions, declensions of pronouns, the 
indicative mode of the verb, and sentence order. Frequent reviews enable 



Division of General Science 255 

the student to digest the facts presented, while the abundant conversation 
and written work subserves the same end. Text, Becker and Rhoades' 
Elements of German (first twenty-five lessons). 

2. — Elementary German II. Sophomore year, each term. Class, 
work, four hours. Four credits. Required in the course in home eco- 
nomics; elective in other courses. Prerequisite: Elementary German. 

The remaining important points of grammar are studied. Students 
.are repeatedly drilled on the grammatical constructions already em- 
phasized in Elementary German I. The general plan of the work is the 
same as in the preceding term. Essential facts of grammar are insisted 
upon, but German is taught as a living language. Conversational exer- 
cises in German and written translations from English into German are 
frequent. Text, Becker and Rhoades' Elements of German (completed). 

3. — German Readings. Sophomore year, each term. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. Required in the course in home economics; 
elective in other courses. Prerequisite: Elementary German II. 

This course embraces readings of dialogue selections which deal in 
detail with German life, customs, history, and mythology. A few of the 
best and most popular song poems also are studied. Grammatical drill 
is continued, with occasional sight readings and translations into Ger- 
man. Conversations are based on the readings. Text, Bacon's Im Voter- 
land. 

4. — German Comedies. Elective, fall or winter term. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. Elective in the courses in general science, 
home economics, and agriculture. Prerequisite: German Readings. 

The course comprises the reading of recent one-act comedies of literary 
merit, and of a realistic, lively and cleanly humorous nature, including 
the following: Julius Rosen's Ein Knopf, Gustav von Moser's Ein 
amerikanisches Duell, Hugo Mueller's Im Wartesalon erster Klasse, and 
Emil Pohl's Die Schulreiterin. Exercises in conversation and sight read- 
ing are occasionally introduced. Text, Manley and Allen's Four German 
Comedies. 

5. — Scientific German I. Elective, fall term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. Prerequi- 
site: German Readings. 

This course is designed as an introduction to the vast field of scientific 
publications appearing in German. It consists chiefly in translating 
miscellaneous scientific articles written in simple language. Texts to be 
selected. 

6. — Scientific German II. Elective, winter term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. Prerequisite : 
Scientific German I. 

This is a continuation of the preceding course. The subject matter 
is here, however, restricted to the field of agriculture. Agricultural 
bulletins which have already appeared in Germany are read. Texts to 
be selected. 

7. — German Prose I. Elective, winter term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. Elective in the courses in general science and home eco- 
nomics. Prerequisite: German Comedies. 

This is a practical course designed to give the student an intimate 
knowledge of everyday German as used among the Germans in their 
varied activities. The following are studied in this course: visits; the 
various stores; restaurants, and drinking customs; meals, and expres- 
sions used at table; boarding houses and hotels; the family, weddings, 
marriages, etc.; dress; the school system; religion and church life; divi- 
sions of society, occupations; money, measures, and weights; festivities; 
traveling; the postal system, the telegraph, the telephone; the city in 



256 Kansas State Agricultural College 

general; Berlin and cities of the provinces; the country; the German 
empire; the military system; conversational phrases; the best German; 
everyday German. There are occasional sight translations, and some 
conversational work is done. Text, Kron's German Daily Life. 

8. — German Prose II. Elective, spring term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. Elective in the courses in general science and home eco- 
nomics. Prerequisite: German Comedies. 

This course is designed to give the student facility in the rapid transla- 
tion of fairly easy prose. A number of modern short stories are read.- 
Besides the more formal work, there are sight translations of easy selec- 
tions. Text, Allen and Blatt's Easy German Stories, Vols. I and II. 

9. — German Classics. Elective, spring term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. Elective in the course in general science. Prerequisite: 
German Prose I or II. 

This is a course introductory to a study of the German classics. Two 
or three of the simpler works of classic authors, such as Lessing's Minna 
von Barnhelm and Goethe's Hermann und Dorothea, are translated in the 
work of this term. Textbooks : Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm, edited by 
von Minckwitz and Wilder, and Goethe's Hermann und Dorothea, edited 
by Allen. 

10. — Teachers' German. Elective, spring term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits- Elective in the course in general science; elective, 
optional with German Prose II, in the course in home economics. 

In this course a rapid but thorough review of the grammar is given, 
and composition work is carried on in connection with it. Sight transla- 
tions and conversation also occupy part of the class period. Text, Bier- 
wirth's Elements of German, and mimeographed matter furnished by the 
department. Prerequisites: At least five terms of college German or its 
equivalent. Germans who have not had the formal preparation for this 
course may be assigned to it upon obtaining the consent of the head of 
the department. 



History and Civics 

Professor Price 
Instructor Taylor 
Instructor Iles 
Instructor James 
Assistant Reynolds 

The Department of History and Civics offers nineteen different 
courses, as described below. Six of these are offered in the vocational 
schools, and are to be taken in the order designated, though each of these 
subjects is taught practically every term. The department is well 
equipped with maps and charts, and has, all things considered, an un- 
usually strong library. 

Training for citizenship, breadth of view, historic-mindedness, fairness 
of judgment, and general culture are constant aims of each course offered 
by the Department of History and Civics. As a result of the training 
received in these courses, the student is better prepared to understand and 
appreciate the institutions in the midst of which he lives and of which 
he is a part. He is also prepared to act more wisely his part as a leader 
in good citizenship wherever his lot may be cast. 



Division of General Science 257 

COURSES IN HISTORY 

1. — Advanced English History. Freshman or sophomore year, spring 
term. Class work, four hours. Four credits. Required in the courses in 
industrial journalism and general science; elective in the course in home 
economics. 

This course traces the story of the growth of England from the Britain 
of the earliest time to the British empire of to-day. The political history 
is clearly traced, but emphasis is laid upon the constitutional develop- 
ment, and the practical working of the present governmen- is carefully 
studied. Much emphasis is given to the industrial and social develop- 
ment of the people, especially to the more recent industrial revolution. 
One of the especially interesting features of this course is the study of 
England's institutions and government as her colonial empire emerged, 
and the conditions under which the United States of America became 
independent of England. While this is primarily a textbook course, with 
Cheyney's Short History of England as the text, supplementary reading 
is required, especially from Green's Short History of the English People 
and Cheyney's Industrial and Social History of England. As far as the 
limited time permits, lectures are given on contemporary continental 
institutions, movements, and conditions. 

2. — French History. Elective, fall term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. Elective in the courses in home economics and general 
science. 

The story of the growth of the French nation is traced from the days 
when Gaul was a Roman province, through the fall of Rome and the 
German conquest to the development of the Christian church and of the 
institution of feudalism. Then occurs a study of the Crusades, of the 
formation of the French nation, and of the beginnings of absolute mon- 
archy, to the time of the emergence of France into a great European 
power. There follows a survey of the Hundred Years' War, of the 
Protestant Revolution, of the religious civil wars, and finally of the 
monarchy under Louis XIV. The study of the old regime in France, of 
the French Revolution, of Napoleon, and of the new nation, brings this 
course to the point where the course in Modern Europe begins. Text, 
Adams' The Growth of the French Nation, supplemented by special 
library assignments, and by lectures on medieval institutions. 

3. — Modern Europe. Elective, winter term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. Elective. 

This is a study of the evolution of the modern European nations out 
of eighteenth century conditions, especial . emphasis being laid on the 
period since the French Revolution. A study is made of the principal 
features of their present governments as actually conducted, together 
with the leading questions that are now agitating the several European 
states. An investigation is also made of existing international relations, 
and of the more important problems of the modern world, such as the 
Turkish problem, China, and the partition of Africa. Text, Robinson 
and Beard's Development of Modern Europe, Vol. II, and readings. 

4. — Advanced Industrial History. Sophomore year, fall term, or 
jimior year, winter term. Class work, four hours. Four credits. Re- 
quired in the courses in the Division of Mechanic Arts. (This course is 
also incorporated in courses 5 and 6.) 

This course covers: (1) a study of the physical geography, geology, 
climate, etc. ? of the American continents and how these have affected 
American history and institutions; (2) a study of the discovery and 
colonization of America — the impelling motives, the life, occupations, re- 
ligion, psychological temperament, political institutions, etc., of the people, 
of the attitude of the mother country toward colonization and the col- 
onists, and of the later history of immigration; (3) the influence of the 

—9 



258 Kansas State Agricultural College 

frontier on American history and development; (4) a study of the South 
before the war (under slavery), and of the new South as it has been 
developed since the war, including a comparison of the South with New 
England and the West; (5) a study, running throughout the course, of 
the life and the industries or occupations of the people; (6) a review of 
the leading facts in the political history of the nation. This course is 
based on an American history notebook, prepared by the department; but 
special use is made of such texts as Bogart's Economic History of the 
United States, Coman's Industrial History of the United States, and 
Simon's Soc'il Forces in American History. Instruction is given by 
means of lee. ires, assigned readings, and reports. 

5. — American History I. Junior or senior year, fall or winter term. 
Class work, four hours. Four credits. Required in the courses in general 
science, home economics, and industrial journalism; optional in the course 
in agriculture. (This course incorporates the first part of Advanced 
Industrial History.) Prerequisite (except by special permission) : 
American Government. 

This is an advanced course in the political, constitutional and industrial 
history of America to 1845. The course covers the conditions that led to 
the discovery of America; the period of discovery; the causes and de- 
velopment of colonization; the French and Indian War; the War of the- 
Revolution; the struggles of the confederation period; the specific politi- 
cal, economic and industrial lines along which the nation has developed. 
This is a library course, and each student uses an American history note- 
book of topics and references prepared by the department, as an aid to 
larger, more definite and more thorough work. 

6. — American History II. Senior year, each term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Required in the course in industrial journalism; 
elective in other courses. 

The work of this term continues the course in American History I down 
to the present time. It includes a study of the annexation of Texas and 
the Mexican War, with the resulting slavery issue; the compromise of 
1850; the Kansas-Nebraska bill and the early Kansas struggle "to the 
stars through difficulties," including the various constitutions and the 
final admission to statehood; the origin of the Republican party; the 
election of 1860; secession; a comparative study of the North and the 
South before, during, and after the war ; a study of some leading features 
of the war, including financial questions and foreign relations; recon- 
struction — political, social, and industrial ; presidential elections, especially 
that of 1876; and finally, a study of the Spanish War and of America's 
new position as a world power. The American history notebook is con- 
tinued. Emphasis is given to the industrial phases of American history, 
in an effort more clearly to understand and appreciate the present indus- 
trial age. This course incorporates the latter part of Advanced Industrial 
History. Prerequisite: American History I. 

7. — European Industrial History. Senior year, spring term. Class 
work, four hours. Four credits. Elective in the courses in the Division 
of Agriculture. 

This course includes especially the industrial and social history of 
England, the industrial life and institutions of the middle ages, and a 
survey of the most important phases^of the industrial conditions in modern 
Europe, and in China, Japan, and the Philippines. It includes the es- 
sential features of the history of civilization — the chief elements in the 
story of human progress. Based primarily on such texts as Cheyney's 
Industrial and Social History of England, and Innes' England's Industrial 
Development. Supplemented by lectures and reference work. 

8. — History of Home Life and the Law of Domestic Relations. 
Junior or senior year. Class work, four hours. Four credits. Elective 
in the course in home economics. 



Division of General Science 259 

The character of this course is suggested by .e title. It certainly 
includes essential features of the history of civ" jation, and traces the 
story of human progress from the dawn of histo: > to the present moment. 
The course is now in preparation, and will be offered in the near future. 
It will be based on a combination of texts, lectures, and library readings. 

9. — Kansas History. Elective, spring term. Class work, two hours. 
Two credits. 

This course covers the history of Kansas from the beginning down to 
the present time, with emphasis on the period of statehood. The conquest 
of the frontier, the building of the state, and the social, industrial, and 
political advance to the present day are studied. This is a library course, 
based on outlines and references furnished by the department. 

10. — Ancient History. Class work, four hours. Four credits. Elec- 
tive. Open to all students who can satisfactorily carry the work. 

This is intended primarily for those who expect to teach this subject 
in the high schools. It includes a study of the ancient world, its indus- 
tries, art, literature, and government. The course will be based on one of 
the standard modern texts, and is intended to familiarize the student with 
the best modern literature on the subject. 

11. — Immigration and International Peace. Class work, one hour. 
One credit. Elective. Students may attend this course without special 
assignment, but regular assignment and attendance on at least ten les- 
sons of this course is required in order to get any college credit. 

The title of the course suggests its character. One of the most im- 
portant questions confronting our nation to-day is that of immigration. 
Possibly the most interesting question in world politics is that of inter- 
national peace, as compared with the heavy burden of military and naval 
armaments, and the awful cost of war. 

COURSES IN CIVICS 

1. — American Government. Junior or senior year, fall, winter or 
spring term. Class work, four hours. Four credits. Required in the 
courses in agriculture, home economics, general science, and industrial 
journalism. 

This course in civics, or actual government, reviews definitely the 
fundamental principles and operations of our state and national govern- 
ments, including the essential principles of constitutional law, but gives 
special emphasis to the. actual present-day conditions and movements in 
our governmental and political life. Among the subjects especially 
studied are the initiative and referendum, suffrage and primary elections, 
the recall, city government and government of territories, the regulation 
of commerce, conservation of national resources, national defense, taxa- 
tion and finance, the actual methods of congressional activity^ and the 
function, organization, power, and importance of political parties in our 
government. The course is primarily based on such texts as Beard's 
American Government and Politics and Hart's Actual Government. 

Throughout this course special and definite attention is given to recent 
and current events in governmental activities. 

2. — Business Law. Junior year, winter or spring term. Class work, 
two hours. Two credits. Required in all the courses in the Division of 
Mechanic Arts; elective in other courses. 

This course is planned to give, primarily, a definite knowledge of the 
essentials of the law of contracts, followed by a briefer study of agency, 
bailments, and carriers, the law of sales and of negotiable instruments; 
secondly, the elements of the law of real property, including study of 
deeds, mortgages, leases, franchises, rights of way, and water rights; 
finally, a brief study of patent rights and of torts, especially the law of 
negligence. Text, Huffcut's Elements of Business Law. 



260 Kansas State Agricultural College 

3. — Farm Law. Elective, spring term. Class work, two hours. Two 
credits. Elective in the course in general science and in the course in 
agriculture. 

This course outlines the following subjects as far as the time permits: 
First. The title to the farm — deeds, etc.; boundaries of the farm- 
fences, etc. ; water rights, including irrigation ; police power of the State 
— quarantine, destruction of diseased animals, pure food; live stock — 
liability of owner, trespassing animals, estrays. Second. Contracts, in- 
cluding hired help, etc.; farm crops and their ownership; renters; sales, 
including warranty, etc.; factories, or commission merchants; common 
carriers, such as railroads; insurance. The course is based on Green's 
Law for the American Farmer, supplemented by the Kansas statutes. 

4. — International Law. Elective, winter term. Class work, two 
hours. Two credits. Elective in the course in general science. 

The fundamental principles of international law and international re- 
lations, and rights and obligations, public and private, in time of peace 
and in time of war, are studied, especially in the light of recent develop- 
ments, such as the Hague conferences. Text, Wilson on International 
Law (Hornbook Series, 1910). 



Industrial Journalism 

Instructor Smith, in Charge 
Assistant Detwilek 

The purpose of the course in industrial journalism is to give greater- 
facility in the use of English, with especial reference to the demands of 
newspapers, farm publications and magazines, in disseminating informa- 
tion concerning agriculture and the industries generally. 

Instruction in industrial journalism does not begin until the junior 
year, and students desiring to take it must come prepared with the 
necessary training in English and other fundamentals of such a course. 
They will be required, also, to conform to a schedule of optional courses 
particularly suited to this profession, and certain to be valuable to them 
after they leave college. Special students with the necessary prerequi- 
sites will be admitted. 

A series of lectures describing the theory and practice of journalism 
is continued throughout the two years. Especial emphasis is given to 
the industrial branch of the profession. A part of every lecture hour 
may be used for criticism or special instructions to the class. 

COURSES IN INDUSTRIAL JOURNALISM 

1. — Elementary Journalism. Junior year, fall or spring term. 
Class work, two hours. Two credits. Required in the courses in in- 
dustrial journalism and agriculture ; elective in other courses. 

In this course the students learn the first principles of the profession 
as they are acquired in actual service. Examples of industrial writing, 
good and bad, are presented for consideration; farm journals and their 
ideals and requirements are discussed; and the students are told just 
what to do and how to do it under given circumstances. 

2. — Farm Writing. Junior year, winter term. Class work, two 
hours. Two credits. Required in the course in industrial journalism; 
elective in other courses. Prerequisite: Elementary Journalism. 



Division of General Science 261 

This course contemplates the most careful instruction in preparing: 
material for publication in daily and weekly papers throughout the 
State, and in farm journals. The work covers the principal points and 
objections noted by editors of both classes of publications, and gives 
particular attention to suggestions leading to the development of at- 
tractive features in stories of agriculture, home economics, and me- 
chanic # arts, and in campus news. The ordinary laboratory or practice 
work incidental to assignments is continued. Attention is given live- 
stock advertising and illustrations. 

3. — Gathering News. Junior year, spring term. Class work, two 
hours. Two credits. Required in the course in industrial journalism; 
elective in other courses. Prerequisite: Farm Writing. 

The lectures and work of this course are designed to familiarize stu- 
dents with the requirements of newspapers in small cities and towns in 
respect to the matter of gathering and presenting current events. A 
part of the term is given to consideration of the principles and problems 
of country journalism. 

4 to 9. — Journalism Practice I to VI. Junior and senior years; 
four hours. Two credits, each term. Required in the course in industrial 
journalism; elective in other courses. The prerequisite for each term 
is the work of all preceding terms in Journalism Practice. 

Journalism practice consists in gathering information, or news, to 
which the students have been assigned, and in writing the stories, or 
articles, in the department workroom. Assignments are given at regular 
periods and must be accounted for exactly as in a newspaper office, or as 
in any college course in which certain tasks are performed in the presence 
of the instructors. The students write articles for The Kansas Indus- 
trialist, the official paper of the College, and for farm journals and news- 
papers, describing the work of the Experiment Station, and the in- 
dustrial work of the various departments. At least one article, and in 
emergency, two or more articles, must be written every week. In pro- 
portion as they advance, the students do more important laboratory, or 
practice, work. They are required to write special stories and editorials, 
and in every possible way conduct the actual business of a newspaper 
office. References are looked up, and special articles prepared for pub- 
lication under personal supervision. Special instruction is given in the 
use of technical and semitechnical expressions in writing, with a clear 
understanding of their meaning. In this way students learn to avoid 
many of the errors inevitably made in newspaper articles written by 
persons unfamiliar with the phraseology of the professions. 

10. — Copy Reading. Senior year, fall term. Class work, two hours. 
Two credits. Required in the course in industrial journalism; elective in 
other courses. Prerequisite: Gathering News. 

This work teaches the students how to detect, . avoid and correct the 
common errors in newspaper writing. The lectures cover practically 
every point encountered in many types of publications. In this part of the 
course students learn how to emphasize in the headlines the most impor- 
tant -and interesting features of a manuscript. Special attention is given 
advertising, type faces, and the work of making up a newspaper. 

11. — Newspaper Law. Senior year, winter term. Class work, two 
hours. Two credits. Required in the course in industrial journalism; 
elective in other courses. Prerequisite: Copy Reading. 

This course is intended to supply the most valuable instruction in the 
law covering the conduct of newspapers and other publications, particu- 
larly with respect to libel. One half the class periods are given to the 
history of newspapers in the United States and to the law of copyright. 
The ethics of the profession, invaluable to every one desiring to write for 
the press, are discussed. The students continue their agricultural and 
industrial writings as in the other terms. 



262 Kansas State Agricultural College 

12. — Editorial Practice. Senior year, spring term. Class work, two 
hours. Two credits. Required in the course in industrial journalism; 
elective in other courses. Prerequisite: Newspaper Law. 

A cultural course designed to broaden the student's viewpoint as to the 
conduct of the editorial department of newspapers and farm journals, as 
to the theories that underlie its work, and as to the factors and influences 
that control it. To encourage the formation of opinion and to stimulate 
thought, acceptable contributions written by the students are printed in 
the College paper. A part of the term is given to a study of the history 
of agricultural journalism in the United States. 



Library Economy 

Librarian Smith 
Reference Librarian Derby 
Research Assistant G-ericke 

The library supplements the work of every department of the College. 
It is a storehouse of knowledge for every student. It supplies information 
and the latest results of scientific research for every instructor. The 
library is thus essential to the College, forming, as it were, a center from 
which its various activities radiate. 

In order that the library may perform its functions with the highest 
degree of efficiency it is necessary that instruction be given regarding its 
use. With this thought in mind a course is offered the purpose of which 
is to familiarize the student with scientific, up-to-date methods in the use 
of books and to acquaint him with the best general reference books as 
well as with standard works on various subjects. Placed at the beginning 
of his College course it should tend to increase largely his efficiency in 
study throughout the entire course. 

COURSES IN LIBRARY ECONOMY 

1. — Library Methods. Freshman or sophomore year; fall, winter or 
spring term. Class work, one hour; laboratory work, two hours. Two 
credits. Required in the courses in general science, agriculture, and 
home economics. 

The course consists of lecture and laboratory work on classification 
and arrangement of books in the library; card catalogues; the principal 
works of reference, such as dictionaries, encyclopedias, atlases, hand- 
books of general information, handbooks of geography, history, literature, 
economics, quotations, statistics, etc.; public documents and their indexes; 
indexes to periodicals; trade, national and subject bibliographies, etc., 
Instruction is given also in methods of indexing current technical reading 
for purposes of future reference. 

2. — Library Methods E. Freshman year, spring term. Laboratory 
work, two hours. One credit. Required in all courses in the Division of 
Mechanic Arts. 

This course is similar to that listed above, but consists of laboratory 
work only. It is not an equivalent of Library Methods, and may not be 
substituted for it. 



Division of General Science 263 



Mathematics 

Professor Remick 
Associate Professor Andrews 
Assistant Professor White 
Assistant Professor Porter 
Assistant Professor Stratton 
Instructor Zeininger 
Instructor Clevenger 
Instructor Fehn 
Assistant Holrotd 

In an institution that stands as an exponent of the industrial type of 
education, mathematics should occupy an important place. Training in 
the exact science is valuable not only for its own sake but also on ac- 
count of its manifold applications. On this basis the courses in mathe- 
matics are offered primarily with the following ends in view: (1) the 
attainment of mental power and accuracy in the interest both of general 
culture and special application; (2) the acquirement of facts and proc- 
esses that will provide the student with an indispensable tool for further 
scientific and technical study. 

Freshman courses are offered each term, sophomore courses at least 
twice during the year. 

COURSES IN MATHEMATICS 

1. — Plane Trigonometry. Freshman year, fall term. Four hours. 
Four credits. Required in the courses in engineering, architecture, and 
general science. Prerequisite: Solid Geometry; Algebra IV (or equiva- 
lent) . 

This course treats of the functions of acute angles, right triangles, 
goniometry, oblique triangles, practical problems. Text, Rothrock's Plane 
and Spherical Trigonometry. 

2. — College Algebra. Freshman year, winter term. Four hours. 
Four credits. Required in the courses in architecture, engineering, and 
general science. 

Elementary topics, functions and their graphs, quadratic equations are 
rapidly reviewed. The further treatment includes the subjects of complex 
numbers, theory of equations, permutations and combinations, partial 
fractions, logarithms, and determinants. Text, Higher Algebra, by 
Hawke. 

3. — Analytical Geometry. Freshman year, spring term. Four hours. 
Four credits. Required in the courses in architecture and engineering; 
elective in the course in general science. Prerequisites: Plane Trigo- 
nometry and College Algebra. 

This course treats of coordinate systems, projections, graphical repre- 
sentation, loci, straight line, conies, parametric equations, maxima and 
minima, empirical equations. Emphasis is placed upon graphical work. 
Text, Brief Course in Analytic Geometry, by Tanner and Allen. 

4. — Calculus I. Sophomore year, fall term. Four hours. Four 
credits. Required in the courses in engineering; elective in the course in 
general science. Prerequisite: Analytical Geometry. 

This course includes a study of fundamental ideas, a thorough treat- 
ment of the processes of differentiating standard elementary forms with 
applications to geometry and mechanics. Maxima and minima, differen- 
tials, and rates are discussed in connection with practical problems. Text, 
Differential and Integral Calculus, by Granville. 

5. — Calculus II. Sophomore year, winter term. Four hours. Four 
credits. Required in the courses in engineering; elective in the course in 
general science: Prerequisite: Calculus I. 



264 Kansas State Agricultural College 

The chief topics considered are curvature, mean value theorem, partial 
differentiation, expansion of functions, integration of standard algebraic 
and transcendental expressions, definite integrals, rational fractions, and 
integration by parts. This course contains problems closely related to the 
work of engineering students. Text, Differential and Integral Calculus, 
by Granville. 

6. — Calculus III. Sophomore year, spring term. Four hours. Four 
credits. Required in the courses in engineering; elective in the course in 
general science. Prerequisite: Calculus II. 

In this division of the subject the emphasis is laid on the application 
of calculus to practical problems. Problems involving areas, lengths, 
surfaces, and volumes are treated by processes of single integration. The 
idea of successive and partial integration is applied to areas, moments, 
centers of gravity, surfaces, volumes, etc. The types of differential 
equations which the student of engineering is most likely to meet with in 
his subsequent work are briefly discussed. Text, Differential and In- 
tegral Calculus, by Granville. 

7. — Spherical Trigonometry. Junior year, fall term. Two hours. 
Two credits. Required in the course in civil engineering. Prerequisite: 
Plane Trigonometry. 

The usual formulas employed in the solution of right and oblique 
spherical triangles are here discussed. After familiarity with the formu- 
las has been gained through the medium of abstract examples, a brief 
course of applications follows, including in particular problems of astron- 
omy. 

8. — Calculus. Junior year, winter term. Four hours. Four credits. 
Elective in the course in general science. Prerequisite: Analytical 
Geometry. 

This course is designed especially for students intending to teach 
secondary mathematics. It includes a brief treatment of the fundamental 
principles of both branches of calculus, practice with the standard formu- 
las of differentiation and their application to geometry and to practical 
problems involving maxima and minima, rates, etc. Integration of the 
usual elementary forms is followed by the idea of the definite integral 
and a few of the more important applications. 

9. — Teachers' Course in Mathematics. Junior year, spring term. 
Four hours. Four credits. Elective in the course in general science. 

As its name indicates, this course is intended primarily for those who 
are planning to teach elementary mathematics. Emphasis is given to 
pedagogical questions, with some reference to the historical course of 
development. A discussion of the best methods of teaching arithmetic, 
algebra, and geometry, a study of the reports of prominent mathe- 
matical organizations, especially those of the international commission, 
a comparison of curricula in different schools, these are some of the 
matters which receive consideration. An examination is made of books 
and articles on the teaching of mathematics. The course proceeds by 
lectures, reading, and reports on assigned topics. 

10. — Analysis of Statistics. Senior year, fall term. Four hours. 
Four credits. Elective in the course in agriculture. 

The special purpose of this course is to acquaint students of agri- 
culture, who may have occasion to make use of statistical tables of vari- 
ous sorts, with the modern mathematical methods of treatment. Use is 
made of farm bulletins, agricultural reports, etc., by means of lectures, 
readings, and recitations. 

11. — Mathematics of Biology. Senior year, spring term. Four hours. 
Four credits. Elective in the course in general science. Prerequisite: 
Analytical Geometry. 



Division of General Science 265 

Elements of differential and integral calculus, curve plotting, and de- 
termination of equations of curves, are here considered. This course is 
designed to meet the needs of students in biology and is taught largely 
by the lecture method. 

12. — Graduate Courses. In addition to the preceding undergraduate 
courses, more advanced work in mathematics is offered for candidates for 
the master's degree. Courses are given in the following subjects: Ad- 
vanced Calculus, Solid Analytical Geometry, Differential Equations, 
Theory of Equations, Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable, 
Modern Analytical Geometry, and Theoretical Mechanics. 



Military Training 

Second Lieutenant Hill, Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
Commissary Sergeant Clabeen" (U. S. A., retired), Assistant 
B. H. Ozmbnt, Band Leader 

Since this College is one of the beneficiaries of the act of Congress of 
1862, military tactics is required in the College curriculum. All young 
men under twenty-five years of age are required to take military drill 
three full hours a week for two years, unless excused from a part of this 
on account of membership in College athletic teams. (See Physical 
Education.) 

The course of instruction is concisely stated in General Orders No. 231, 
War Department, 1909, as follows: 

"The main object of military instruction given at civil educational in-, 
stitutions having army officers as professors of military science and 
tactics will be to qualify students who enter the military departments of 
such institutions to be company officers of infantry, volunteers, or militia." 
In compliance with this general requirement, the course of instruction 
is divided into practical and theoretical work, arranged as follows : 
a. — Practical: 

Infantry drill, including school of the battalion. 

Butts' Manual, with music. 

Signal drill: International Morse code. 

First-aid drill. 

Minor tactics: advance and rear guard, outposts, patrolling, 

and marches. 
Target practice. 

Ceremonies: parade, guard mounting, review, inspection, funeral 
escort, and escort to the colors. 
b. — Theoretical: 

Company administration for cadet officers. 
War Department manuals. 
Lectures. " 
Students under military instruction are organized into a battalion or a 
regiment of infantry, the organization, drill, and administration of which 
conform to that of the army. 

Since the number of students assigned to military drill is sufficient to 
maintain a battalion organization, a band is also provided, the members 
of which must be thoroughly trained in the drill of the school of the 
squad. Assignments to the band are made upon request of the band 
leader, who is charged with the technical instruction. 

Officers and noncommissioned officers are selected by the Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics, with the .approval of the President. This 
selection is made from among those cadets who have been the most 
studious and soldierlike in the performance of their duties, and the most 
exemplary in their general deportment. In general, the cadet captains 
and lieutenants are taken from the senior class, the sergeants from the 
junior class, and the corporals from the sophomore class. 



266 Kansas State Agricultural College 

The degree of excellence attained in military drill by the corps of 
cadets is limited wholly by the state of discipline existing in the corps. 
Therefore, military discipline, as far as compatible with College regu- 
lations, is rigidly enforced during the hour allotted to military work; and 
it is impressed further upon all cadets that their actions and behavior at 
times other than the hour for military drill should be regulated by the 
standards of honor and duty inculcated in military discipline. Each 
cadet is furnished with a copy of the Regulations for the Corps of Cadets, 
Kansas State Agricultural College, and is expected to conform to the 
rules and requirements of the same. 

All young men in College courses below the junior year, unless ex- 
cused by reason of physical disability, are required to take military drill, 
and to complete the work of each term in a satisfactory manner. All 
requests for credit, for excuse on surgeon's certificate of permanent dis- 
ability, or for postponement because of exceptional circumstances, are 
made to the President through the Commandant of Cadets, who thor- 
oughly investigates each case on its merits and forwards the request, with 
his recommendations, for executive action. Additional work is optional 
with seniors and juniors, who are given preference for appointments as 
cadet officers and noncommissioned officers. A senior or junior having 
enrolled optionally, and having accepted a commission or warrant; is re- 
quired to continue the work throughout the College year, subject to the 
same regulations as other cadets. 

The uniform conforms generally to the West Point pattern. The cost 
of cap, blouse, and trousers varies from $15 to $18. This expenditure 
actually represents an economy, as the young man receives an excellent 
well-fitting suit, durable in texture and build, which gives him at all 
times a well-dressed appearance. The uniform must be purchased im- 
mediately after enrollment. New cadets, after being assigned to military 
drill, report at once to the office of the Commandant of Cadets for measure- 
ment, and then make their cash deposits to cover the cost of the uniform. 
The buying of old or of second-hand uniforms is absolutely prohibited, 
and, they will not be accepted as satisfactory uniforms by the Command- 
ant of Cadets. 

At the close of the year the names of the cadets most distinguished in 
military science and tactics are reported to the War Department, and 
also to the adjutant-general of the State of Kansas. 

To the cadets completing the full course in military science and tactics, 
many excellent opportunities are offered. These young men are well pre- 
pared to stand examinations for commissions in the regular service or in 
the Philippine constabulary, and their training at this institution makes 
of them efficient subalterns. In addition to such positions, opportunities 
exist for affiliation with the National Guard of the State. The War De- 
partment is in fact now preparing a plan whereby certain honorably 
mentioned graduates of institutions of this character may be commis- 
sioned in the National Guard. 

The Department of Military Training offers elective courses as fol- 
lows: Small-arm Firing Regulations; Field-service Regulations; Camp 
Sanitation; Guard Manual; Field Engineering; First Aid to the Injured. 



Division of General Science 267 



Music 

Professor Valley 
Assistant Professor Brown 
Assistant Baum 
Assistant Ping 
Assistant Biddison 
Assistant Baird 
Assistant Easter 
Band Leader Ozmbnt 

Recognizing the importance of music in daily life, the power, cul- 
tural influence, inspiration, and pleasure it affords, and the necessity of 
musical knowledge for those who intend to enter the profession of teach- 
ing, this College offers to the earnest student a good opportunity for the 
study of music. 

No regular or required course is given. The student may take music 
for one term only, or for an extended period of four years. Instruction is 
furnished free to all regular students assigned to class work in the follow- 
ing branches : voice, piano, violin, wind and brass instruments ; notation, 
theory, harmony, and musical history- For individual instruction a fee is 
charged. 

Class Instruction. Class organization is wholly under the control 
of the professor of music, and classes are organized at such periods as 
best accommodate the students interested. There is a growing demand 
for teachers of music in high schools, and those taking advantage of the 
courses offered will be well equipped to teach the subject. 

COURSES IN MUSIC 

VOCAL 

First Year. — The course for this year includes a study of breathing, 
tone placing, vocal physiology, and simple forms of vocal technique, and 
the rendition of simple songs and ballads. Text, Teacher's Exercises. 
Coneone's Vocalises, op. 9-17. 

Second Year, — The study of vocal technique is extended. Concpne's 
Vocalises are continued. Sacred songs and ballads are studied. 

Third and Fourth Years.— ^Vocalises by Bordese, Lamperti, Marchesi, 
Nava, Panseron, Rubini, and songs by Schubert, Brahms, Schumann, and 
other masters, as well as oratorio and operatic arias, are studied during 
these years. 

PIANO 

First Year. — This course includes : studies in the rudiments of music, 
melody, rhythm, and the underlying principles of touch and technic; 
etudes by Gurlitt, Streabbog, Burgmuller, Kohler, and Biehl, and simple 
selections from modern composers. 

Second Year. — In this course are studied the compositions of Loesch- 
horn, Czerny, Heller, Lecouppey, Bertini, Duvernoy, and Smith. Pre- 
paratory octave studies, a study of scales, and special technical work 
are also offered. 

Third Year. — Advanced work in technic and scales; studies by Cramer, 
Czerny, Field; Bach's little preludes and fugues; two-part inventions; 
Kullak octave studies; sonatas by Haydn and Mozart; selections from 
Chaminade, Rubinstein, Grieg, Scharwenka, Godard, Jensen, and Poldini, 
form the basic matter of this course. 



268 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Fourth Year. — Advanced work in technic, phrasing, and interpreta- 
tions; Bach's three-part inventions and well-tempered clavichord; de- 
menti's Gradus ad Parnassum; Foote, MacDowell, and Henselt etudes; 
Beethoven sonatas; and more difficult selections from classic and modern 
composers, are studied during this year. 

VIOLIN 

First Year, — Particular attention is given to attaining correct posi- 
tion, intonation, and bowing. Methods by Hohmann, Wichtl; etudes by 
Wohlfahrt; scale studies; easy pieces, are considered in this course. 

Second Year. — Methods by Wichtl, Dancla, etudes by Wohlfahrt, Kay- 
ser's Technical Studies; duets by Pleyel, Mazas, etc.; selections from 
Dancla, Singelee, De Beriot, and modern composers, are the subjects of 
study during the second year. 

Third Year. — Methods by De Beriot, David; technical studies by 
Schradieck; special studies; Mazas scale studies; etudes by Kreutzer; 
selections from De Beriot, Alard, and others; orchestral playing, com- 
prise the work in this course. 

Fourth Fear.— Etudes by Kreutzer; Mazas's brilliant studies; scale 
studies; selections from Mozart, Tartini, Vieuxtemps, Wieniawski, and 
others; orchestral playing; ensemble classes, comprise the work of this 
advanced course. 

ELECTIVE IN MUSIC 

In connection with vocal and instrumental music the following subjects 
are given: 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Term. — Theory, including notation of music, pitch, rhythm, 
measure, symbols, metronome marks, acoustics, chromatic signs, keys, 
major and minor scales, signatures; harmony, including intervals, triads 
of the major and minor scales; the history of music, including ancient 
and oriental music, and the progress of musical development to the close 
of the sixteenth century, are studied in this course. 

Winter Term. — Theory, including intervals, chords, ear training, 
thinking tones, nonchordal tones, embellishments, and abbreviations used 
in music; harmony, including inversions of triads, dominant sept- 
chords and inversions; and history of music, treating music in the sev- 
enteenth century, opera, oratorio, and instrumental music to the present 
.day, are studied during this term. 

Spring Term. — Theory, including musical forms, vocal, instrumental, 
instrumentation and uses of various instruments, modern orchestra, 
prosody, musical terms in general use; harmony, including collateral 
sept-chords of the major and minor scales, inversions, cadences; and the 
.history of music, including the biographies of great musicians — Bach, 
.Haydn, Handel, Beethoven, Chopin, Schumann, Liszt, Wagner, Grieg, and 
^others, are treated in this course. Texts: Theory, Musical Essentials, 
by Maryatt; Harmony, text by Brockhoven; History, text by Fillmore. 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Term. — Two lessons a week in vocal music or in specialized in- 
strument are given. The work in harmony includes a study of chords of 
ninth, eleventh, etc., and altered chords. 

Winter Term. — Two lessons a week in vocal or in specialized in- 
strument are given. The work in harmony includes a study of sus- 
pensions, analysis, and modulation. 

Spring Term,— -Two lessons a week in vocal music or in specialized in- 
strument are given. The work in harmony includes a study of modula- 
tion, and harmonization of melodies. 



Division of General Science 269 

Musical Organizations. Each instrument has a distinct function in 
the science of tonal expression, and only in the combination of instru- 
ments are the finest effects in the coloring of the melody, harmony and 
rhythm procured. This combination is made possible in the Department 
of Music by the number of students and by the variety of instruments. 
Students who are sufficiently advanced to join the College Choral Union, 
the College Glee Club, the College Orchestra, or the Military Band, may 
become members by assignment. 

The Orchestra. — This organization endeavors to maintain a correct and 
well-balanced instrumentation, and gives the members opportunity for 
practical orchestral playing. The work is highly educational, including, 
as it does, the study and performance of standard overtures, symphonies, 
and concert pieces in classic and modern form. The orchestra furnishes 
music for the College Assembly each morning and assists in several con- 
certs and entertainments during the year. 

Choral Union. — Chorus singing is of great importance to students in 
voice, and this society was organized for their benefit. The students re- 
ceive here much needed experience in sight reading, become, familiar with 
choral masterpieces, and enjoy the broadening influence of these works. 
One rehearsal is held each week. Regular attendance is required. 

Assembly Chorus. — The more advanced students are invited to sing in 
this chorus, which has for its object the rendition of a weekly choral 
selection at the assembly. Only the highest class of church music is used 
on these occasions. Rehearsals are held on Friday afternoons. 

Glee Club. — The College Glee Club averages about sixteen of the best 
male voices in the institution. 

Military Band. — The band is a part of the cadet corps, and practice in 
the band is accredited, through the Military Department, in lieu of drill 
and theoretical instruction. Members of the band are required to conform 
strictly to cadet regulations. Assignments to the band are made for the 
entire year by the leader. Members of the band are required to attend 
regularly until after Commencement exercises. The band furnishes music 
for all ceremonies of a military character and for various other college 
occasions. 

Annual Concert. — On Wednesday of Commencement week, an annual 
concert is given by the Choral Union, assisted by the orchestra. In the 
spring term a number of musical recitals are given, of which the students 
furnish the entire programs. These recitals are open to the public. 



Physical Education 

Professor Lowman 
Instructor Meenee 
Instructor Sellnee 
Assistant Holliday 
Assistant Hutto 

The purpose of this department is to assist the students of the College 
to live to the best advantage, and so to aid them in the formation of 
hygienic habits that during their College course they may make profitable 
preparation for life. It is an urgent necessity that every student 
have an intelligent appreciation of the means requisite for the preserva- 
tion of his health, in order that he may be able to formulate intelligently 
his own policy of health control. 

All young men and all young women of the College are entitled to the 
privileges of the gymnasium, which is one of the largest in the West and 
is well equipped with all sorts of apparatus for physical training, with 
lockers, plunge baths, shower baths, and other accommodations. 



270 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Physical training is optional for men, but may be elected. Three days 
a week for the term is considered full time, and for this one hour of credit 
is given. A total of six hours of credit may be elected. All young women 
below the junior year are required to take physical training, unless ex- 
cused by the Dean of Women, except that in the sophomore year music 
may be taken instead; provided that the student has a credit of at least 
one year of physical training. Women excused from physical training on 
account of physical disability are provided by their dean with an equiva- 
lent or stronger substitute from the regular course, and their normal work 
later in the course is increased by that amount. After the two years, 
required physical training have been completed, women have the privilege 
of. electing physical training for credit under the conditions stated above 
for the men. 

The following phases of departmental work are combined for the 
purpose of accomplishing the desired end: 

PHYSICAL TRAINING FOR MEN 
PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS 

The work of the department is based largely upon a physical examina- 
tion given each student upon his first entrance to the College. A second 
examination is given at the close of his sophomore year. All students, 
whether taking work in the department or not, are entitled to receive a 
physical examination, and advice as to their physical condition. 

The measurements taken and the tests given have each a definite pur- 
pose with reference to ascertaining the muscular condition of the indi- 
viduaL A diagnosis is also made of the vital organs to ascertain their 
functional conditions, and a complete inspection of the whole body is made 
to detect any weakness or deformity that may exist. Based upon the in- 
formation thus obtained, advice is given and work is assigned to students 
in accordance with their physical needs and tastes, and their condition of 
fitness. Delicate students, and those suffering from functional disorders, 
receive individual attention. Students organically sound are assigned 
work in a carefully graded and progressive system of gymnastics and ath- 
letics. All candidates for athletic teams, class as well as College teams, 
are required to enroll in the department, submit to a thorough physical 
examination, and pass the grade tests before being allowed to compete for 
positions on the various teams. Students engaging in two or more Col- 
lege sports during the school year must undergo a physical examination 
before undertaking any given sport. This is required in order that no 
student may indulge in athletics to his own permanent physical injury. 
Each student may secure a copy of his own physical measurements, and 
an anthropometric chart, showing in graphic form his own development 
as compared with the average or typical man. 

Members of the College teams, reporting regularly, are excused from 
regular class work, and are entitled to full credit in that portion of their 
work; but before the completion of the course, at least two terms 7 work 
must be done in the gymnasium. Credit, the equivalent of a one-hour sub- 
ject, is given and counts toward the College degree. The individual's 
grade rests largely on the basis of attendance, punctuality, earnestness, 
and application; but written and practical tests are also given. 



Division of General Science 271 

Regulation uniforms must be worn in the gymnasium. Students are 
•advised not to procure uniforms until after their arrival at the College. 

A student who is a regular member of one or more of the College ath- 
letic teams, if due to take military drill, may be transferred to physical 
education for the season of the sport in which he participates, but no 
man may take part in more than two sports, of one term each, in one year. 
At the end of the season the man is reported back to the Department of 
Military Training for the remainder of the term, and a grade reported to 
the Registrar by the Professor of Physical Education for the student's 
work in that department, stating the time devoted to it; and a grade in 
military drill is reported by the Professor of Military Training for the 
student's work in military drill, stating the time given to that subject. 

Men due to take military drill are permitted to try for the freshman 
athletic teams, and, if chosen for such teams, may be transferred from 
military training to physical education, as are regular members of the 
College athletic teams. Grades in the two subjects are also to be re- 
ported in a similar manner. 

Men in the College teams, in the freshman athletic teams, or on trial 
for these teams, must report regularly for athletic work, and any who 
fail in -this respect are returned to the Department of Military Training 
at once. 

All requests for transfer from military to athletic work must come 
directly from the Professor of Physical Education, and as soon as the 
transfer is definitely decided upon, the Registrar and the dean are notified 
in order that a proper record of the change in assignment may be made. 

Students who are due to take military drill but who expect to be on 
athletic teams for one or more sports, must be measured for military 
uniforms and order uniforms at the beginning of the term in order that 
they may be ready for use at once when the students are reported back to 
the Department of Military Training. 

HYGIENIC INSTRUCTION 
This instruction gives an insight into the practical problems of daily 
healthful living from a personal point of view. Directions are given for 
avoiding the common ills of student life, and for maintaining the highest 
physical and mental condition while in college, as well as for. gaining the 
highest development of vital power and health for future duties. 

1. — Freshman Course. Sixteen lectures. These lectures give special 
attention to exercise, rest, food, respiration, care of excretions, cloth ing, 
anH bathing and cleanliness. The effects of certain abnormal bodily con- 
ditions and habits are also given due consideration; e. g., adenoids, large 
tonsils, decayed teeth, mouth breathing, rapid eating, the use of narcotics 
and stimulants, constipation, and certain phases of social hygiene. Train- 
ing principles for athletic contests and athletic equipment also receive 
attention. 

2. — Sophomore Course. Twelve lectures. This course reviews and 
enlarges upon certain phases of the freshman course; deals with bac- 
teria and a few other common causes of disease, their distribution and 
transmission; includes a discussion of the "common carriers'' of disease, 
such as food, water, clothing, flies, mosquitoes, other insects, animals, and 
careless human beings; discusses the defenses against disease, such as 
established boards of health and quarantine, and appropriate sanitary 



272 Kansas State Agricultural College 

legislation. ^ The defenses of the individual, such as cleanliness, avoidance 
of the carriers of disease, the use of antiseptics, sunshine, fresh air, and 
immunity are further discussed. 

INSTRUCTION IN PHYSICAL EXERCISE 

This course furnishes instruction in all the various grades of gymnastic 
and athletic exercises offered by the department. The great variety of 
exercises offered is intended to meet all individual needs, capacities and 
tastes. A physical examination and test determines the grade or class 
of exercises for which a student is fitted. 

A. — Gymnastics. During the winter term the work is conducted in- 
doors, and consists of light and heavy gymnastics, which are selected 
with a view to obtaining progressive effect upon the bodily organism : 

a. Free Calisthenics, Exercises are selected for their different effects 
upon the bodily organism, and are arranged in the order of increasing 
difficulty. They involve hygienic or body-building work, educative move- 
ment, and corrective or remedial exercises. Both the Swedish and the 
German systems are used. 

b. Tactics. A modified form of the military and of the German sys- 
tem is used, both for convenience in handling classes and for disciplinary 
value. 

c. Light Apparatus. Training is given in the use of Indian clubs, 
dumb-bells, wands, bar bells, etc. 

d. Heavy Apparatus. Graded exercises are given on parrallel bars, 
vaulting bars, bounce board and. mat, side and long horse, high and low 
horizontal bars, traveling and flying rings, etc. 

e. Indoor Athletics. Instruction is given in all indoor track events 
preparatory to indoor track meets. 

/. Games. There are included basketball, indoor baseball, volley ball; 
also, other games of a more recreative nature. 

g. Specials. Under this head come fencing, boxing, wrestling, tum- 
bling, and advanced apparatus work, offered as advanced work to those 
who have had not less than two terms' work in the gymnasium. Hours 
are arranged with the instructor. 

h. Swimming. A part of the regular instruction for the spring term 
is in swimming. A passing grade must be made Jn this phase of the 
work. 

B. — Departmental Athletics. In the fall and spring terms, the 
courses in the gymnasium are partly supplemented by instruction in out- 
door athletics. Individuals are assigned to the kind of work best suited 
to them. Attendance is compulsory upon those participating. In the 
fall the following sports are offered: football; track and field events; 
cross-country running; and outdoor basketball. In the spring are 
offered: baseball; track and field events; cross-country running; and 
outdoor basketball. 

Cross-country running is encouraged throughout the year. Natural 
exercise in the open air takes precedence of all other forms of exercise. 
Opportunity is offered for tennis, but it can not be elected in place of 
required work. 

Days unsuited for outdoor work are devoted to a discussion of playing 
rules, the principles of training for athletic contests, and lectures on 
team work. 

C. — Intercollegiate Athletics. These contests are promoted and 
encouraged for the more vigorous students, because of their effect upon 
college life, and their wide social and moral value to the participants. 
Intercollegiate teams should represent the final stage of selection in an 



Division of General Science 273 

educational process and development among a large number of students, 
thereby giving both a rational physical education system and a healthy 
system of sport. Intercollegiate contests are scheduled for the different 
sports; viz., football, basketball, baseball, track athletics, and tennis. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING FOR WOMEN 
PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS 

A physical examination of each young woman is made by the instructor 
in charge of women before permission to enter a class is given. This 
includes an elaborate system of body measurements and an examination 
of the condition of the heart and lungs. Physical defects, abnormalities, 
and weaknesses are noted and judicious, healthful exercise is prescribed 
to fit the student's individual needs. 

A suit has been adopted which consists of black serge blouse and 
bloomers, and must be made in uniform style. The pattern for the suit 
is the Ladies 7 Home Journal pattern number 5421. 

INSTRUCTION IN PHYSICAL EXERCISE 

1. — Physical Training I. Freshman year, each term. Four hours. 
Required of all young women. 

Health talks are given. Correction of improper standing and walking, 
marching, free exercises, folk dancing, elementary series in wands, dumb- 
bells, Indian clubs, balance ladder, song plays, and games, are treated in 
this course. 

2. — Physical Training II. Freshman year, each term. Four hours. 
Required of all young women. Prerequisite: Physical Training I. 

In this course military marching, fancy steps, continuation of work 
with light apparatus, stall bars, flying rings, giant stride, work with chest 
weights, games and basketball are included. 

3. — Physical Training III. Freshman and sophomore years, each 
term. Four hours. One term required of all young women; three sub- 
sequent terms, optional with music, required of all sophomore young 
women. 

Fancy marching, esthetic dancing, advanced free exercises, coordina- 
tion of work with Indian clubs, wands, and dumb-bells, jumping horse and 
parallel bars are here included, along with folk dances and song plays, 
tennis, and indoor baseball. Prerequisite: Physical Training II. 



Physics 

Professor Hamilton 
Instructor Jenness 
Instructor Floyd 
Assistant Rabubit 
Assistant Allee 
Assistant Piper 

Recognizing the need of a thorough knowledge of the fundamental laws 
and principles involved in all physical changes, provision has been made, 
in the courses which follow, for both a theoretical and a practical treat- 
ment of the subject. Instruction is based upon the facts given in selected 
textbooks, and these topics are enlarged upon by lectures and illustrated 
by experimental demonstrations. The purpose is to give a training in 



274 Kansas State Agricultural College 

exact reasoning, and a knowledge of principles that will be factors in the 
solution of problems in all branches of science as well as in everyday life. 
The laboratory work which accompanies the courses in physics gives 
a student abundant opportunity to test the principal laws of the science; 
and, since he is expected to arrange and operate the apparatus, the work 
should enable him to acquire skill in manipulation, precision of judgment, 
and care in the use of delicate instruments. The laboratories are well 
arranged for the work, and the equipment provided is of a nature adapted 
to meet the requirement of accurate work in all courses. The manual in 
use in most of the courses is one prepared by the department to meet the 
exact conditions and equipment of the laboratory. 

COURSES IN PHYSICS 

1. — Household Physics. Fall, winter, and spring terms. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. 

A course of lectures and demonstrations, in which the laws relating 
to principles involved in appliances of the household are explained and 
illustrated. The work in heat is based upon thermometry, calorimetry, 
radiation, absorption, and methods of refrigeration and ventilation. The 
course includes a study of light, with its color phenomena and actinic 
effects; of some of the optical instruments used in scientific work; a study 
of electric lighting and illumination, and of cost of operating many of 
the appliances used in the home, including suggestions for the proper 
use and care of electrical apparatus for the protection of the appliance 
and of the operator. 

2. — General Physics I. Fall term. Class work, three hours; lab- 
oratory, two hours. Four credits. Prerequisite: Plane Trigonometry. 

This course, like the one following, is provided for those intending to 
specialize in scientific lines. It covers, in as thorough a manner as pos- 
sible, the general principles involved in mechanics and sound. Text, 
Reed and Guthe's College Physics. 

Laboratory. — The work is based upon laws and principles discussed in 
the classroom, and is so arranged that the students may have a practical 
illustration of the facts learned. 

3. — General Physics II. Winter term. Class work, three hours; lab- 
oratory, two hours. Four credits. Prerequisite: General Physics I. 

This course includes a study of the theory of electricity. The class 
follows the subject as outlined in the text, but special emphasis is placed 
upon those parts that have an immediate bearing on the work of other 
sciences, such as electrolysis, thermal effects, relation of electrical and 
mechanical energy. Text, Reed and Guthe's College Physics. 

Laboratory. — The work follows the subjects presented in the class, and 
is conducted with a grade of apparatus that gives training in the use of 
the better class of instruments employed in scientific investigations. 

4. — General Physics III. Spring term. Class work, three hours; 
laboratory, two hours. Four credits. Prerequisite : General Physics II. 

The work offeree! in this course includes the theory of heat and light. 
A study of the various effects of heat and the units employed in heat 
measurements. The work in light discusses not only the effects of light, 
but the* methods used in measuring light intensities and the ways in which 
light may be used in physical measurements. Text, Reed and Guthe's 
College Physics. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work consists of measurements in calo- 
rimetry, photometry, spectrum analysis, and light waves. 



Division of General Science 275 

5. — Engineering Physics I. Fall and winter terms. Class work, four 
hours; laboratory, two hours. Five credits. Prerequisite: Trigonometry. 

This course in mechanics is intended to give the engineering students 
as thorough a working knowledge as possible of the fundamental units 
and laws involved in force, work, power, and energy; also the laws of 
simple machines, gases, and liquids as they occur in the transformation of 
force and energy. Text, Spinney's A Textbook of Physics. 

Laboratory. — The work consists of the use of apparatus to test the 
laws of inertia, moments of force, moments of torsion, elasticity, and 
rigidity, and other laws and principles" involved in mechanics. Accurate 
measurements and carefully recorded data are required. 

6. — Engineering Physics II. Winter and spring terms. Class work, 
four hours; laboratory, two hours. Five credits. Prerequisite: Engineer- 
ing Physics I. 

This course treats of electricity and light. The work in electricity is 
of such a nature as to give the student a working knowledge of the units 
employed, and of the fundamental laws ; and to acquaint him with methods 
of producing a current, its uses, and the system by which electrical energy 
is measured. The principal phenomena of light, together with the laws 
that may have a direct bearing upon light as a standard and method of 
measurement, are treated in this course. Text, Spinney's A Textbook of 
Physics. 

Laboratory, — The electrical work in this course includes measurements 
of resistances, a study of primary cells, and the transformation of me- 
chanical into electrical energy. The work of light consists of a study of 
the laws of reflection and refraction, and measurements of wave lengths 
by means of the spectroscope, the use of the interferometer, and pho- 
tometry. 

7. — Engineering Physics III. Fall and spring terms. Class work, 
four hours; laboratory, four hours. Six credits. Prerequisite: En- 
gineering Physics II. 

Heat is treated both theoretically and practically, and in such a man- 
ner that its relation to mechanical energy is emphasized. The methods 
of measuring heat energy and the methods of heat transformation and 
transference are discussed and illustrated. The facts in sound that in- 
volve points of special use and training are discussed. Text, Spinney's 
A Textbook of Physics. 

Laboratory. — This course consists of measurements of velocity of 
sound in solids and gases, thermometry, calorimetry, expansion of solids, 
liquids, and gases, and the mechanical equivalent of heat. 

8. — Agricultural Physics. Spring term. Class work, four hours. 
Four credits. 

This course includes a series of lectures and class demonstrations based 
upon heat, light and electricity as involved in influencing farm life. The 
elementary factors of weather and weather forecasting are explained, and 
access given to the weather records and apparatus of the College weather, 
station. The work in light emphasizes the value of light in plant growth, 
in specturm analysis, and in many of the natural phenomena. Electricity 
is presented in such a manner that the student may gain a working knowl- 
edge of the various electrical appliances that can be used on the farm. 

9. — Acoustics. Fall term. Class work, two hours. Two credits. 

In this course a special study is made of the acoustic properties of 
buildings, of the architectural defects which give rise to poor acoustics, 
with a study of special methods used to avoid such troubles in construc- 
tion of buildings or to correct them in constructed buildings. 

10. — Kadiant Energy. Fall term. Class work, three hours; labora- 
tory, two hours. Four credits. Elective. 



276 Kansas State Agricultural College 

This course and the two courses following are arranged with the 
special purpose of giving a training which will be of value to those who 
may intend to teach physics, chemistry, or mathematics, or to those ex- 
pecting to do advanced scientific work. The various forms of radiant 
energy are discussed: spectra and spectrum analysis, polarized light, 
radioactivity, electric and magnetic waves, absorption and dispersion and 
their phenomena. 

Laboratory. — The work is based upon the theory developed in the 
class work, and includes the use of the spectrometer, polariscope, inter- 
ferometer, optical bench, of photometry, etc. 

11. — Physical Measurements. Winter term. Class work, two hours; 
laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective. 

The class work is based upon principles that are involved in instru- 
ments for accurate measurements. The instruments described and used 
are typical ones employed in measurements of mechanical forces, heat, 
and electricity. Part of the class work is the development of formulas. 

Laboratory. — The work is so selected as to give the widest possible 
range in the variety of instruments used and of principles illustrated. 

12. — Physical Manipulations. Spring term. Class work, two hours; 
laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective. 

Class periods are utilized for outlining and discussing the selection and 
arrangement of apparatus for demonstrational work. 

Laboratory. — The work consists of glass blowing, bending and grind- 
ing; silvering, photography, electroplating, and the making of pieces of 
apparatus for special demonstrations. In this course opportunity is given 
those intending to teach to become thoroughly acquainted with modern 
laboratories and laboratory methods. 

13. — Photography. Fall or spring term. Class work, two hours; 
laboratory, two hours. Three credits. Elective. Prerequisite: training 
in physics and chemistry. 

The importance of a record of exact details, as shown in a photograph, 
makes this work valuable to all scientists. The course gives the student 
some knowledge of the chemical and physical principles involved in the 
art, as well as practice in making good negatives and prints. The lecture 
and laboratory work deals with: things to be considered in selecting a 
camera; proper exposures; composition of pictures; proper development 
of plates; tests of different developers; retouching; reducing and intensi- 
fying negatives; printing and mounting; making lantern slides, bromide 
enlargement, and the prints best adapted for illustrated articles in news- 
papers and magazines. 



Public Speaking 

Assistant Professor John-stO-NT, in Charge 
Assistant Beach 

It is the constant effort of the Department of Public Speaking to cor- 
relate the training " in public speaking with the work in all the other 
departments of the College; to harmonize it with the spirit of the school, 
which is distinctly technical and industrial. With this end in view, stu- 
dents in agriculture are trained in the presentation and discussion of 
agricultural facts before supposed audiences of farmers. Students in en- 
gineering, architecture, etc., are trained in speaking on subject matter 
relating to their respective courses of study, and to their probable needs 
and activities in later life. Conviction, not entertainment, is the dom- 
inant purpose in every case. 



Division of General Science 277 

COURSES IN PUBLIC SPEAKING 

1. — Public Speaking. Freshman year, fall, winter, or spring term. 
Four hours a week. Four credits. Required in the courses in general 
science and industrial journalism. 

This course begins with a study of the fundamental principles and 
accepted rules of public address. These are applied in the interpretation 
of selected masterpieces of general literature and oratory, and also in the 
delivery of original subject matter by each student, the class serving as 
his audience and critics. Some time is devoted to exercises in correct 
breathing, articulation, and tone production, and to fit these to the indi- 
vidual needs of students. Instruction is given by recitation, lectures, and 
platform work. Text, Kammeyer's Principles and Practice of Public 
Speaking. 

2. — Extempore Speech. Freshman year, spring and fall terms. Two 
hours a week. Two credits. Required in the courses in the Division of 
Mechanic Arts. 

This course is an abbreviation of Public Speaking and is limited to 
students in the Division of Mechanic Arts. It is not an equivalent of 
Public Speaking and may not be substituted for it. Instruction is given 
by means of lectures and platform work. 

3. — Technique of Speech. Junior or senior year, winter term. Two 
hours a week. Two credits. Elective in the course in general science. 
Prerequisite: Public Speaking or Extempore Speech. 

The specific purpose of this course is to offer more extended drill and 
practice in vocal and physical expression than can be given in the others 
as outlined. Practically all the time is devoted to exercises for the cor- 
rection of faulty articulation, grouping, bearing, attitude, gesture, etc. 
* Reading and impromptu speaking before the class afford opportunity for 
testing and ability acquired. The dominant purpose of the course is to 
help students to fix correct habits of speech by means of frequent repeti- 
tions and conscious effort. Instruction is given by means of drill and 
platform work. 

4. — Forms op Public Address. Junior or senior year, spring term. 
Four hours per week. Four credits. Elective in the course in general 
science. Prerequisite: Public Speaking or Extempore Speech. 

A special study of types of utterances and forms of public address is 
made. Great orations of ancient and modern times are studied in their 
historical settings, analyzed, and interpreted. Original platform work 
continues throughout the term, and consists of after-dinner speeches, 
memorial addresses, debates, and other forms of public address for formal 
occasions. Instruction is given by means of assigned readings, lectures, 
and platform work. 



Sociology. 

Professor Holtost 
Assistant Professor Reisner 

It is recognized by all students of the development of civilization that a 
knowledge of the fundamental laws controlling social groups is essential 
in the education of those who will largely determine the character of our 
rural and urban institutions. The controlling motive in the courses in 
sociology is the need of efficiency in our social institutions. 



278 Kansas State Agricultural College 

COURSES IN SOCIOLOGY 

1. — Principles op Sociology. Senior year, fall term. Class work, 
four hours. Four credits. Required in the courses in agriculture and in- 
dustrial journalism; elective in other courses. 

This course attempts to make a systematic survey of social processes 
from the view point of developing fundamental principles and laws of 
social control. The work is given by means of textbook, lectures, and 
reports. 

2. — Social Psychology. Senior year, winter term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Elective. Prerequisites: Psychology; Principles 
of Sociology. 

This course is a study of the group-mind and its influences upon the 
individual mind. It attempts to show the influence of traditions, customs, 
conventionalities, etc., upon present-day social institutions and individual 
habits. Text, Social Psychology, by McDougall. 

3. — Rural Sociology. Senior year, spring term. Class work, four 
hours. Four credits. Optional in the course in agriculture; elective in 
other courses. 

This is a course in the elements of sociology applied to rural tradi- 
tions, customs, and institutions. An outline of the course is as follows: 
Old World peasantry; the making of peasantry; prevention; the trend 
of rural population; the composition of rural population; rural social 
institutions; the rural church; the rural school; farmers' organizations; 
vital statistics; moral level; delinquency and dependence; insanity; the 
position and work of women ; farm labor ; rural politics ; cultural ideals ; 
standards of business; the psychology of rural life; class consciousness. 

4. — Community Surveys. Senior and graduate students, fall, winter, 
or spring term. One double period a week. The number of credits de- 
pends upon the time given to investigation and the quality of the work. 
Elective. 

This course is a study of the methods of investigation and plans of 
work employed by social-service institutions, such as endowed founda- 
tions and bureaus of municipal research. Each student works out plans 
for, and makes a survey o£, the health, social, economic and educational 
conditions in a given community. 



Zoology 

Professor Nabours 
Assistant Professor Ackeet 
Instructor Harman 
Assistant Yocum 

Classroom teaching and laboratory instruction are closely correlated, 
and the student is expected to be able to draw conclusions based upon a 
comparison of information from both sources. As nearly as circumstances 
permit, the classroom and laboratory work on the same form proceed 
simultaneously. By means of frequent and carefully planned excursions 
and the free use of vivaria in the laboratory and museum, the student is 
never allowed to forget that he is dealing with living creatures, in many 
cases fellow members of his own environment, some of which are decidedly 
beneficial or decidedly injurious to his welfare. The courses offered by 
this department are intended to awaken in the student an appreciation of 
the general principles of animal life and of its relation to the welfare of 
man. 



Division of General Science 279 

A large number of standard anatomical charts, and representative 
collections of vertebrates and invertebrates, a series of lantern slides, and 
a series of microscope mounts are available for illustrative purposes. 
Oompound and dissecting microscopes sufficient for the needs of laboratory 
classes have been provided. 

COURSES IN ZOOLOGY 

1 to 3. — General Zoology I, II, and Embryology. Sophomore year 
for students in agriculture and home economics. Freshman year for 
students in general science, industrial journalism, and veterinary medi- 
cine. Required of all students in these courses. Fall, winter, and spring, 
or winter, spring, and fall terms, respectively. Class work, two hours; 
laboratory, four hours. Four credits each term. Men and women are 
taught in separate sections. The students are grouped in sections ac- 
cording to the amount of their experience, and the nature of the work 
is varied to suit the needs of each group. 

Course 1 represents a connected elementary study of the structure and 
functions of types selected to illustrate the development of the invertebrate 
part of the animal kingdom. Attention is given to classification and the 
relations of the different forms. 

Course 2 consists of a connected elementary study of the structure and 
functions of types selected to illustrate the development and relations of 
the vertebrate parts of the animal kingdom. Some attention is given to 
classification, but the work mainly consists of a study of the organs and 
their functions of a few selected types. 

Course 3 (Embryology) represents a study of the development of the 
germ cells, fertilization, and the nutrition and growth of the vertebrate 
embryo, with a greater emphasis on the comparative study of the de- 
velopment and nutrition of the foetuses of the domestic mammals and man. 
This course aims to give a general idea of embryological development and 
a better understanding of the organs and their functions of the types in 
the phylum Chordata. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work in courses 1 and 2 consists of obser- 
vations of the form and activities of living animals, both in the field and 
in the vivaria in the laboratory and museum, and of the dissection and 
sketching of the important systems of those animals selected as types. 
The laboratory work in embryology represents a microscopic study of the 
male and female germ cells, stages in the process of fertilization, the 
segmenting ovum, and the serial sections and whole mounts of the chick 
and pig embryos in several stages of development. Considerable at- 
tention is given to the dissection and study of the relations of the foetus 
to the uterus of the mother in the cat, the pig, the cow, and man. 

4 to 6. Advanced Zoology I, II, and III. Junior or senior year, fall, 
winter, and spring terms, respectively. Class work, two hours; laboratory, 
four hours. Four credits each term. Elective in the courses of general 
science, agriculture, and home economics. Prerequisites: General Zo- 
ology I, II, and Embryology, or equivalent. 

Course 4 represents a fundamental study of the structure and functions 
of invertebrate types. Course 5 begins the same sort of study of chordate 
types. Relationships are considered from the point of view of embryology 
and paleontology, as well as that of comparative anatomy. Course 6 is a 
continuation of the preceding. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work consists of the dissection and 
sketching of the systems of selected types and of such experiments in 
fundamental physiology as the time and apparatus permit. 



280 Kansas State Agricultural College 

7. — Advanced Mammalian Embryology. Senior year, winter term. 
Elective in the courses in general science and agriculture. Prerequisite: 
General Zoology I and II, and Embryology, or equivalent. Lecture and 
class work, three hours. Three credits. 

This course consists of a review and further study of the main facts 
of embryology, with a more particular comparative study of the physi- 
ology of reproduction in the domesticated mammals and man. 

8. — General Zoology Technique. Junior or senior year, spring term. 
One lecture and six hours of laboratory a week. Four credits. Elective 
in the courses of general science, agriculture, and home economics. 

This course is designed especially for those expecting to continue work 
along biological lines. The students become acquainted with methods of 
collecting, killing, and preserving, and with the preparation for study of 
various sorts of zoological material, both gross and microscopic. It 
includes the making of whole mounts and the general methods of imbed- 
ding, sectioning and staining microscopic material for microscopic slides. 
The lectures explain further the theory and practice of useful methods of 
technique. Prerequisites : Zoology I and II. 

9. — Parasitology. Senior year, winter term. Class work, two hours; 
laboratory, two hours. Three credits. Required in the course in veteri- 
nary medicine; elective in the courses in general science, agriculture, and 
home economics. Prerequisites: General Zoology I and II, or the equiv- 
alent. 

This course includes a study of the chief characteristics, life histories, 
economic importance of the serious external and internal parasites of 
domestic animals and man. 

Laboratory, — The laboratory work is a study of the structural and 
functional adaptations characteristic of a parasitic existence. 

10. — Evolution op Domestic Animals. Senior year, winter term. 
Class work, two hours. One credit. Elective in the courses in general 
science, agriculture, and domestic science. 

This course consists of lectures and readings on general evolution, with 
special reference to the domestic animals. The geological history, so far 
as it is known, and some phases in the domestication of our common farm 
animals are given careful attention. Each student works out completely 
the geological and later history of some specially assigned animal. 

11. — Economic ZoSlogy. Spring term, sophomore, junior, or senior 
year. Lectures, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Four credits. Elective 
in the courses in home economics, agriculture, and general science. 

This course consists of a study of the different phyla of animals and 
their dependence on one another, and special studies of birds and mam- 
mals. The publications of the experiment stations and the Department of 
Agriculture and the specimens in the museum are used extensively, both 
in the class and in connection with the field work. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work consists largely of four-hour field 
trips to a number of specially selected areas, ponds, streams, meadows, 
woods, and college farm. Much of the time of the trips is taken in the 
identification of birds and mammals, with special attention given to their 
adaptation and economic importance. 

12, — Zoological Seminar. For the staffs in entomology and zoology 
and advanced students in these departments. No credit. One two-hour 
session a week. Fall, winter, and spring terms, respectively. 

This course consists of the presentation of papers on original investiga- 
tions by members of the two departments and advanced students. Here 
the papers to be read at scientific meetings or published in scientific 



Division of General Science 281 

journals or bulletins are discussed. Most of the sessions are devoted to 
the presentation and criticism of the best thoughts on the fundamental 
problems of biology found in the books and periodicals in the library or 
reported by members from scientific meetings. 



Special Courses for Teachers 

At the present time the teaching of vocational subjects in the public 
schools is undergoing great development. Many schools are introducing 
manual training, agriculture, domestic science, and domestic art, and 
many others are extending the work hitherto given. The State law re- 
quiring the teaching of agriculture in the rural schools is also creating 
a strong movement in the same direction. There is an active demand 
for teachers who can handle such work successfully. 

The College offers to graduates of other institutions, and indeed to all 
who have studied such subjects as may be prerequisite, unexcelled facili- 
ties for securing training in the industrial subjects indicated. Courses 
extending over one or two years may be arranged by means of which the 
student who is already prepared in English, mathematics, and to a cer- 
tain extent in the sciences, may prepare himself to enter a broader and, 
frequently, a more remunerative field. 

Page 225, Nos. 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, and 21, exhibit groupings that 
illustrate the possibilities in work of this character, and other ar- 
rangements may be made. Those taking such courses will be cared for 
in the regular classes provided for other students, and no limitation is 
imposed except that the prerequisites for any subject must have been 
taken previously, here or elsewhere. These prerequisites are stated in 
this catalogue in connection with the description of each subject. The 
catalogue also shows the terms in which a subject is regularly given, 
but many of those of the freshman and of the sophomore year are also 
offered at other times. Prospective students may receive information 
concerning such other opportunities by addressing the President of the 
College. 



282 Kansas State Agricultural College 



The Summer School 

Edwin Lee Holton, Director 



There is no larger or better equipped plant devoted to the 
teaching of agriculture, home economics, mechanic arts, and 
related subjects than Kansas has in her State Agricultural 
College. In order that this plant may not remain idle during 
the summer, the Board of Administration has authorized the 
organization of a Summer School for Teachers. The College 
is authorized by an act of Congress to expend each year a por- 
tion of the national appropriation for "providing sources for 
the special preparation of instructors for teaching the elements 
of agriculture and mechanic arts." 

Each year there is an increasing demand for trained teach- 
ers of agriculture, shop work, and home economics. The Col- 
lege has not been able to supply this demand. The Summer 
School offers an opportunity for experienced teachers to pre- 
pare themselves to meet the new demands placed upon the 
public schools; viz., preparing the boys and girls for vocational' 
and social efficiency. 

ADVANTAGES AT THE KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

For the training of teachers in vocational subjects the Kan- 
sas State Agricultural College has a peculiar advantage. The 
College campus occupies a commanding and attractive site 
upon an elevation adjoining the western limits of the city of 
Manhattan, with electric car service into town and to the 
railway stations. The grounds are tastefully laid out accord- 
ing to the designs of a landscape architect, and are extensively 
planted with a great variety of beautiful and interesting trees, 
arranged in picturesque groups, masses and border plantings,, 
varied by banks of shrubbery and interspersed with extensive 
lawns, gardens and experimental fields. Broad, macadamized 
and well-shaded avenues lead to all parts of the campus. In- 
cluding the campus of 160 acres, the College owns 748 acres of 
land. Outside the campus proper, all the land is devoted to 
practical and experimental work in agriculture. Within the 
College grounds most of the space not occupied by buildings 
or needed for drives and ornamental planting is devoted to 
orchards, forest and fruit nurseries, vineyards, and gardens. 

The College buildings, twenty-one in number, are harmoni- 
ously grouped, and are uniformly constructed of attractive 
white limestone obtained from the College quarries. The Col- 
lege owns and operates its own system of waterworks, and is; 
provided with a complete sewerage system. 



The Summer School 283 

There is a growing conviction among the leading educators 
that the best institution in which to train teachers of voca- 
tional subjects is a well-equipped technical college, where the 
courses of study are pointed towards the producing vocations. 
The Kansas State Agricultural College is such an institution. 

EXPENSES 

Tuition is free. An incidental fee of $3 and a medical fee of 
50 cents a term are charged all students whose homes are in 
Kansas. For nonresidents of the state a matriculation fee of 
$10 upon entrance and an incidental fee of $10 and a medical 
fee of 50 cents a term are charged. Receipts for these fees 
must be presented before enrollment in the College classes. 
Table board varies from $3.50 to $4 a week. Room rent 
ranges from $8 to $12 a month. The College Young Men's 
Christian Association offers accommodations in its building 
for a limited number of students, at prices from $10 to $12 
per month. The cost of rooms is reduced by half where two 
students room together. 

COLLEGE CREDITS 

Full College credit is given for all courses satisfactorily 
completed by regularly matriculated students unless other- 
wise specified in the announcement of the courses. Students 
desiring College credit are not allowed to carry more than ten 
credit hours; provided, that an exceptionally able student 
may be permitted to carry two additional credit hours upon 
the approval of the Director of the Summer School. 

REQUIREMENT FOR ADMISSION 

Four years of high-school work are required for admission 
to the College, but any applicant holding a teacher's certificate 
will be admitted to the courses for the Summer School without 
examination. 

The following classes of applicants will be admitted : 

1. Students already enrolled in the College. 

2. Graduates of high schools that have four-year courses of 
study. 

3. Any persons holding certificates to teach in the state of 
Kansas. 

4. Prospective teachers who are hot graduates of four-year 
high schools and who do not hold teachers' certificates may be 
admitted as special students. 

CONVOCATION 

The hours from ten to eleven on Thursday morning are re- 
served for general assembly of all students. A special address 
and music are arranged for each of these general assembly 
periods. 



284 Kansas State Agricultural College 

LIBRARY 

The Library is open during the summer. The Librarian 
places all the valuable books, bulletins and reports at the service 
of the Summer School students. 

EDUCATIONAL TRIPS 

Trips are arranged, for those who desire to take them, to tlie 
experimental grounds on the College farm and campus, to 
study the work in progress. These trips are under the leader- 
ship of trained men. 

SCHOOL FOR RURAL LEADERS 

From July 14 to 24, 191,4, there will be held the Fifth Annual 
School for Rural Leaders. The College is planning to make 
this a short course in rural economics and social problems for 
the pastors, Sunday-school superintendents, teachers and mem- 
bers of other organizations interested in revitalizing rural 
and village neighborhood life. Some of the best men in the 
country will lead the discussions. 

There will be regular lectures and recitations each day in 
agriculture, rural sociology, economics, and modern methods of 
community building. 

During the afternoons the College will plan for demonstra- 
tions in stock judging, grain judging, trips to the experi- 
mental plots, demonstration fields, gardens and orchards. 



Courses in the Summer School 



Division of Agriculture 

W. M Jardine, Dean 

AGRONOMY 

Professor Call 

Assistant Professor Salmon 

Assistant Bledsoe 

Cereal Crop Production. Class work, six hours; laboratory work, 
four hours. Four credits. Required of all students in agricultural 
courses; elective in the course in general science. 

This course is a study of cereal crops, largely from a production 
viewpoint. The crops considered are corn, wheat, oats, barley, rye, rice, 
buckwheat, and grain sorghum. The origin, the history of development, 
and the factors influencing growth are studied. Facts designating the 
best place in a. rotation of crops are presented. Proper seed-bed prepara- 
tion, cultural methods, and factors which tend to maximum production 
receive highest consideration. 

Laboratory. — In the laboratory a study of the physical characters of 
each of the cereal crops is made. 

Soil Management. Class work, three hours; laboratory work, four 
hours. Two credits. 



The Summer School 285 

This course comprises a study of the management of farm soils, and 
deals with: the origin of soils and their physical nature; the effect of 
different methods of cultivation upon the liberation of plant food; con- 
sumption of moisture, and physical condition of the soil; the effect of 
different crops and different syestems of farming upon the depletion and 
conservation of soil fertility; the use of barnyard manure, including 
proper methods of handling, preserving and applying. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory exercises supplement the class work in 
demonstrating the principles of soil management, as outlined in the class. 

Elementary Agriculture. Class work, seven and one-half hours. 

This course is planned primarily for teachers in the rural and village 
schools. The subject matter is selected and the work presented with 
this end in view. The course covers a year's work in elementary agri- 
culture for the rural and village schools. All laboratory work will be 
presented in such a way that it can be adapted to the needs of the in- 
dividual teachers. This course is especially adapted to prepare the 
teachers to meet the requirements of an act of the legislature, which 
requires teachers to take an examination in the Elements of Agriculture. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Instructor Vestal 
Instructor Blizzard 

Live Stock I. Class work, two hours ; laboratory? eight hours. Three 
credits. Required in the course in agriculture ; elective in the courses in 
general science and industrial journalism. 

This course consists of a study of the market types and classes of 
hogs and horses. 

Laboratory. — Practice in judging. 

Live Stock II. Class work, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Three 
credits. Required in the course in agriculture; elective in the courses in 
general science and industrial journalism. 

This course comprises a study of the market types of sheep and cattle, 
including both the feeder and the fat classes. The different grades and 
classes of wool also receive careful attention. 

Laboratory .- —Practice in judging. 

Principles of Feeding. Class work, seven and one-half hours. Four 
credits. Prerequisite: Agricultural Chemistry. 

This course involves a study of the digestive system and processes of 
nutrition, and the theory of practical economy of rations, both for the 
maintenance and for the fattening of all classes of farm animals. 

DAIRYING 

Professor Rbid 
Assistant Gilbert 

Dairying. Class work, four hours; laboratory, eight hours. Four 
credits. 

A general course in dairying, dealing with the secretion, composition 
and properties of milk; care of milk and cream on the farm, a study of 
the different methods of creaming; construction and operation of farm 
separators; principles and application of the Babcock test; use of the 
lactometer; and butter making on the farm. Lectures supplemented by 
textbook. 

Laboratory. — Practice in operating the Babcock test and lactometer; 
separation of milk and farm butter making. 



286 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Live Stock III. Laboratory, eight hours. Two credits. 

Judging dairy stock from the standpoint of economical production and 
breed type. Score cards are used to teach the student to become accurate, 
thorough and systematic in the selection of animals as representatives of 
breeds, or for feeding purposes. 

HORTICULTURE 

Professor Dickens 
Associate Professor Ahbaen 

Plant Propagation. Class work, six hours; laboratory, eight hours. 
Five credits. Prerequisite: Plant Anatomy. 

A discussion of the natural and cultural methods of propagation ; 
seeds, seed testing, and seed growing; treatment given to different classes 
of seeds; the production of seedlings for stock; grafting, budding, layer- 
ing, making cuttings, and the special requirements necessary in propa- 
gating commercial fruits and ornamental plants. Lectures and assigned 
readings. 

Laboratory. — Practical work in the preparation of seeds, seed testing, 
the preparation of seed beds, the use of seeding machinery, transplanting, 
grafting, budding and general nursery practice. 

Landscape Gardening. Class work, four hours. Two credits. 

Lectures on the principles of landscape art and the means of their 
application to the problems of improving lawns, yards, country homes, 
school grounds, and larger plantations; and an acquaintance with species 
used for obtaining results. 

Orcharding. Class work, six hours. Three credits. Prerequisites: 
Plant Propagation and Pomology II. 

A discussion of the conditions necessary for success with orchards. 
Location, improvement of soil, application of fertilizers, pruning, pre- 
vention of loss from frost, marketing and storage. 

Market Gardening. Class work, four hours; laboratory, four hours. 
Three credits. 

This course comprises a study of the problems and possibilities of the 
market garden, the necessary equipment, and soil requirements therefor; 
the value and cost of fertilizers^ Text, Bailey's Principles of Vegetable 
Gardening. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work consists of the preparation of plans 
for the gardens ; seed testing ; the construction of the hotbed ; the use of 
tools and machines; observations on the growth of crops; management 
of hotbeds and force houses. 

School Gardening. Class work, four hours; laboratory, four hours. 
Three credits. 

This course will be offered if there is a demand for it. 

POULTRY 

Professor Lippincott 

Poultry I. Lectures, four hours. Two credits. 

This is a general course dealing with the value and importance of the 
industry and the management of poultry on the farm. 



The Summer School 287 

Division of Mechanic Arts 

A. A. Potter, Acting Bean 

DRAWING AND ART 

Miss Holm an 

Public School Drawing. Laboratory course, eight hours. 

This course presents free-hand and object drawing and some water- 
color and crayon work for rural and grade schools. The state text in 
drawing is used and the course is especially designed to be helpful to 
teachers in using these books. 

Color and Design I. Laboratory course, eight hours. 

This course consists of a study of color combinations based on spectral 
color. It includes the development of problems illustrating changes of 
hue and value. The principles of design are also developed by problems 
and closely related to the color studies. A notebook is required to be 
kept, consisting of outlines given by the instructor and of original work 
of the student. 

Color and Design II. Laboratory course, eight hours. 
This course continues the study of the principles of color and design. 
Practical applications to dress and to home environment are made. 

Note. — Color and Design II must be preceded by course I, and will not 
be given unless a sufficient number of students with preliminary training 
present themselves. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

Assistant Professor Bray 

Manual Training Methods and Organization. Class work, four 
hours. 

A course dealing with the history of manual training in the United 
States, as well as a similar development in foreign countries. A study 
is made of the different systems, the various forms of hand work, and 
the grades to which they are best adapted; the equipment and material 
required for each of the various lines of work, together with their cost 
and where they can be secured; also the best arrangement of equipment 
and its proper installation. The course will include lectures, recitations, 
discussions, reading, and written reports. 

Manual Training for Primary Grades. Laboratory, ten hours. 

This course is designed to give instruction to teachers in those forms 
of hand work that have been found most profitable in the lower grades. 
The possibilities and adaptations of the different mediums are studied 
and methods of teaching the work are carefully considered. This work 
will include weaving, cord work, raffia, reed work, and cardboard con- 
struction. Lectures, discussions, and reports. 

MECHANICAL DRAWING 

Professor Seaton 
Assistant Bowerman 

Manual Training Drawing. Drafting, eight hours. No credit. 

Instruction and practice in lettering and the, use of instruments. 
Isometric and orthographic projection drawings are made of manual 
training problems. Practice is also given in tracing and blue printing. 

Mechanical Drawing I. Class work, two hours ; drafting, four hours. 
Two credits. Required of all students in engineering courses. 



288 Kansas State Agricultural College 

The course includes the use and care of drawing instruments, with 
simple exercises in making working drawings from given plates. Special 
attention is given to the arrangement of views to secure balance, and to 
the subject matter and layout of titles and notes. 

The following supplies are required: Triangle, T-square, pencils, 
scale, pens, eraser, thumb tacks, drawing paper, and a set of drawing 
instruments. Students are advised not to purchase these supplies until 
after consulting the instructor. Text, French's Engineering Drawing. 

Mechanical Drawing II. Class work, two hours; drafting, eight 
hours. Three credits. Required of all students in engineering courses. 

Free-hand sketches are made from simple machine parts, followed by- 
complete working drawings from these drawings without further refer- 
ence to the subjects. Special emphasis is laid upon the proper selection 
of views to present the necessary information in convenient form, and 
to the dimensioning of the drawings. Text, French's Engineering Draw- 
ing. 

SHOP WORK 

Assistant Professor Carlson 
Instructor House 
Instructor Hollar 
Instructor Hayes 
Instructor Grant 
Assistant Parker 
Assistant Trumbull 
Assistant Ball 

Woodworking for the Grammar Grades. Ten hours, laboratory. 

A careful study of the tools and processes used for woodworking for 
these grades. Lectures, discussions, and reports on methods of intro- 
ducing and teaching this work. A course of suitable exercises for pupils 
of this age will be made, together with the construction of models, show- 
ing progressive steps, for class use. 

Woodworking for the High Schools. Ten hours, laboratory. 

A course in woodworking for high schools, in which a number of the 
most important exercises in joinery are carried out, with a study of their 
application, after which a series of articles in practical cabinet construc- 
tion are made, with a study of the proper method of ornamenting and 
finishing. Lectures, discussions and reports. 

Wood Turning. Ten hours, laboratory. 

A course designed to prepare teachers for teaching wood turning in 
high schools. The work includes typical application of tools and tool 
processes, in turning between centers, on faceplates, and by means of 
hollow chucks. Exercises are given in turning cylinders, cones, beads, 
convex and concave curves, after which articles are made from drawings, 
which have a practical application in a student's home or social life, such 
as handles, mallets, rolling-pins, circular boxes, with covers, Indian clubs, 
dumb-bells, napkin rings, bowls, towel rings, typical vase forms, cups, 
goblets, frames, ornamental stools, etc. While many of these articles are 
made from blue prints, it is the aim to have the student make some 
objects of value from his own designs, both as a project in turning and 
as a practical lesson in designing. 

In connection with the laboratory work a careful study is made of the 
commercial value of wood turning, kinds of wood suitable for this work, 
methods of polishing and finishing work in the lathe, together with a 
study of suitable power transmission, shafting, belting, tight and loose 
pulleys, proper speed, etc. 

Advanced Wooworking. Ten hours, laboratory. 

A continuance of Woodworking for High Schools, in which an oppor- 
tunity is furnished for taking more advanced cabinet construction, includ- 
ing wood carving and inlaying. 



The Summer School 289 

Blacksmithing I. Laboratory, ten hours. 

In this course the field of hand-forging as related to high school is 
covered. The work includes practical exercises in making articles of use, 
which involves the operations of drawing, upsetting, welding, twisting, 
splitting, and shaping. Sufficient instruction is given the student in the 
forging of tool steel to enable him to make and temper many of the tools 
that will be needed in this and other branches of manual training in the 
high school. Lectures, discussions, and reports. 

Blacksmithing II. Laboratory, ten hours. 

Advanced work in the forging of iron and in the manufacture of tools 
such as punches, chisels, drills, scrapers and hammers. Instruction is 
given in the proper methods of heating, forging, hardening^ tempering, 
annealing and working the various kinds of tool steel, and in the case- 
hardening of mild steel. 

Blacksmithing III. Laboratory, ten hours. 

Special work is given in the forging of iron and steel to impart skill 
in the different operations. Some practice will be given in the making 
of ornamental iron work. 

Machine Shop I. Laboratory, ten hours. 

This course includes both bench and machine tool work, in which prac- 
tice is given in chipping, filing, shaper and planer work, scraping, drilling, 
cutting, right and left hand and multiple threads, and murling on the 
lathe. Lectures and discussions accompany the work, so that the funda- 
mental principles are more easily grasped by the student. 

Machine Shop II. 

This course consists of progressive problems in turning and calipering, 
boring, reaming and taper turning and threading on the lathe, exercises 
in chucking, the use of forming tools, practice on the key-seating ma- 
chine, and the making of a spur gear on the milling machine. A study is 
also made of cutting edges and tool adjustments best suited to the dif- 
ferent metals, together with a study of cutting speeds and feeds. 

Machine Shop III. 

This course takes up work on the turret lathe, boring mill; practical 
work is also given with jigs, templets, and a study made of the rapid pro- 
duction of duplicate parts, belts, lacings, and methods of belt connections, 
compound and differential indexing and the cutting of spiral gears on the 
milling machine. 

Note. — The number of hours of credits in course offered in shop work will depend 
upon the amount and quality of work completed. 



Division of Home Economics 

Mary Pierce Van Zile, Dean 

GENERAL COURSES 

Presentation of Home Economics. Two hours. No credit. 

This is a study of methods of presentation of domestic science in grade 
and high schools. Attention is given to the application of the general 
principles of teaching to the teaching of home economics; to the plan- 
ning of lessons and courses outlined, and to the equipment of laboratories. 

Home Economics for Rural Schools. Lecture work, two hours. 

This course will be under the direction of Miss Frances Brown, director 
of home economics in the Division of College Extension. All the work 
will be presented under rural school conditions, using rural school 
apparatus. 

—10 



290 Kansas State Agricultural College 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

Miss Dow 
Miss Mead 
Miss Skinner 
Miss Davis 

Food Preparation. Class work, four hours; laboratory, eight hours. 
Four credits. 

Foods are classified according to similarities in composition, which 
divide them into groups representative of the five food principles : carbo- 
hydrates, fats, proteins, mineral matter^ and water. The carbohydrates 
and the fats are studied as to classification, composition, occurrence, and 
general properties. 

Laboratory. — Principles underlying the^ cookery of the carbohydrates 
and the fats are illustrated in the preparation of representative foods. 

Advanced Food Preparation. Class work, four hours; laboratory, 
eight hours. Four credits. Prerequisite: Food Preparation I. 

This course is a continuation of Food Preparation I. It includes the 
study of the proteins and of the leavening agents. 

Laboratory. — Principles underlying the cookery of proteins are illus- 
trated by preparation of representative foods; practice is given in bread 
making and in cake making. 

Dietetics. Class work, four hours; laboratory, eight hours. Four 
credits. 

This course comprises a study of the fundamental principles of human 
nutrition, as applied to the feeding of individuals under varying physi- 
ological, economic and social conditions; and a study of dietary standards. 

Laboratory. — A practical comparison is made of the nutritive values of 
the common foods by computing, preparing and serving dietaries of spe- 
cific costs in which specified nutrients are furnished. Prerequisite: Food 
and Nutrition I (see College catalogue) ; or Advanced Food Preparation. 

Therapeutic Cookery. Class work, two hours; laboratory, eight 
hours. Three credits. 

Abnormal conditions of digestion, assimilation, and metabolism due to 
disease are studied. 

Laboratory. — This comprises a study of diet in relation to disease, to- 
gether with the preparation of food suitable for the sick, including the 
arrangement of attractive trays for the invalid. Prerequisite: Dietetics. 

Home Nursing. Class work, six hours. Three credits. 

This course is a study of furnishing and care of the sick room, the 
giving of baths, administration of medicine, recording symptoms, the 
giving of first aid to the injured, and the intelligent use of antiseptics 
and disinfectants. 

DOMESTIC ART 

Miss Donaldson 
Miss Buxton 
Miss Fecht 

Textiles. Class work, four hours. 

This course will present the subject of textiles, including such topics 
as their beginnings in the art of primitive people. The study of fibers — 
cotton, wool, silk, flax; the mamifacture and evolution in spinning and 
weaving. 

Hand and Machine Sewing. Laboratory, sixteen hours. 

Hygiene in relation to clothing; suitability of clothing dependent on 
climate, occupation and general health; care and cleaning, repairing, 
relation of cost of clothing to income. 



The Summer School 291 

Laboratory. — Practice in hand and machine sewing as presented in the 
grades and high schools. 

Garment Making. Laboratory, eight hours. Prerequisite: Hand and 
Machine Sewing. 

Study of clothing; economics of spending; cost of clothing. Materials 
affected by adulterations; bargain sales; sweat-shop labor; quality, econ- 
omy in selection, conditions affecting the hygienic and economic value of 
clothes. 

Laboratory. — Drafting and making a shirt-waist dress. 

Drafting, Draping and Designing. Class work, two hours; labora- 
tory, eight hours. Prerequisite: Garment Making. 

Principles of design and combinations of color as applied to dress. 
Laboratory practice in drafting patterns and draping from original or 
copied designs. 



Division of General Science 

,T. T. WiiiLABD, Dean 

BOTANY 

Professor Roberts 
Instructor Wells 

Agricultural Botany. Laboratory, eight hours. 

The purpose of this course is to give high-school teachers a method of 
teaching botany that will bring the subject into closer relation to the 
farm and its problems. It is an attempt to render possible the study of 
botany in a scientific sense, but by the use, so far as practicable, of 
strictly economic plants for laboratory material. Considerable emphasis 
is laid on the study of plants from the natural-history standpoint. Most 
of the larger and more important groups of plants are studied from this 
point of view. The course will fall into the following divisions: (1) The 
plant and its work, two weeks; (2) the kinds of plants, one week; (3) the 
diseases of plants, one week; (4) weeds and their eradication, one week; 
(5) the improvement of plants, one week. 

Diseases of Plants. Class work, two hours; laboratory, two hours. 

The purpose of the course is to give teachers a practical working 
knowledge of the common diseases of agricultural and horticultural 
plants, and especially to enable them to learn to recognize these diseases 
in the field. A study is undertaken of the rusts, smuts, and leaf spot dis- 
eases of cereals and forage crops, of the common diseases of orchard 
fruits, such as apple blotch, apple scab, bitter rot, black rot, brown rot of 
plums and peaches, pear blight, etc., of the common diseases of the im- 
portant truck crops, such as potatoes, cabbage, tomatoes, beans, etc., and 
some attention is given to diseases of ornamental plants, and forest trees. 

The aim of this course is distinctly practical, and only so much investi- 
gation into the character of the fungi causing diseases will be undertaken 
as is absolutely necessary for the intelligent conduct of the course. The 
work will be entirely in the laboratory and field. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Willabd 
Assistant Professor Newman 
Assistant Millek 

Chemistry I. Lectures and recitations, six hours; laboratory, four 
hours. Four credits. 

The term's work begins the study of elementary inorganic chemistry, 
and covers the elements of oxygen, hydrogen and chlorine and their com- 



292 Kansas State Agricultural College 

pounds, this being accompanied by theoretical treatment of the subjects 
of matter, energy, properties of gases, chemical law and theory, solu- 
tion, electrolytic dissociation, acids, bases and salts, and chemical change 
as related to light, heat and electricity. Newell's Inorganic Chemistry 
for Colleges is used, this term's work covering the first 209 pages. The 
text is supplemented by lectures and amply illustrated by experimental 
demonstrations. 

Laboratory. — As far as the time permits, the student performs inde- 
pendently experiments touching the preparation and properties of the 
more important substances. Preference is given to those operations 
which illustrate important principles, and the student is required as far 
as possible to study experiments in that light. Laboratory Exercises in 
Elementary Chemistry, by William McPherson, is used as the laboratory 
guide. 

Chemistry III. Lectures and recitations, six hours; laboratory, four 
hours. Four credits. 

This work completes the study of elementary inorganic chemistry 
begun in the preceding terms, and includes consideration of fluorine, bro- 
mine, iodine, silicon, phosphorus, arsenic, antimony, and the metals. 

Laboratory. — The laboratory work in this course is a beginning in 
qualitative analysis, for which McPherson's Elementary Treatise on 
Qualitative Analysis is the guide. 

Organic Chemistry. Lectures and recitations, eight hours per week. 
Four credits. Chemistry III is a prerequisite. 

A systematic study is made of examples of the more important 
classes of organic compounds in their logical chemical relations. Such 
substances as the hydrocarbons, alcohols, organic acids, fats, soap, sugars, 
starch, proteids, and other less known substances are treated with 
greater detail. Compounds used for clothing, food, fuel, light, anti- 
septics, disinfectants, anesthetics, poisons, medicines, solvents, etc., are 
included. The subject is amply illustrated by experiments in the lecture 
room. 

Qualitative Analysis. Lecture, four hours; laboratory, eight hours. 
Four credits. 

In this course the prime object is to increase the student's knowledge 
of chemistry as a whole. The standard methods of analytical chemistry 
are made the basis of a systematic study of the chemical properties of the 
most important metals, nonmetals, acids, bases, and salts. The teaching 
of analysis as such is a secondary object, although the student is held to 
the exact observations and careful reasoning required in ascertaining 
the composition of single substances and mixtures. The theories of chem- 
istry receive constant application. The effect of the course is to broaden, 
strengthen, and unify the student's ideas of general chemistry, to enlarge 
greatly his knowledge of chemical facts, and at the same time to fix many 
of them in his mind by associating them with the reactions made use of 
in analytical processes. This subject must be preceded by Chemistry III. 

Laboratory. — The regular , methods of qualitative analysis serve as a 
basis for laboratory study of the chemical properties of substances. 
Laboratory manual, Qualitative Analysis, by W. A. Noyes. 

EDUCATION 

Professor Holton 
Assistant Professor Reisner 

History of Education. Seven and one-half hours. Four credits. 

This course will cover in the usual way the general history of edu- 
cational progress from the earliest times to the present, except the 
educational development in the United States. 



The Summer School 293 

School Administration and Law, Seven and one-half hours. Four 
credits. 

This course will include a consideration of such subjects as the follow- 
ing: School and classroom management, the relation of the various ranks 
of school officers to one another, administrative measures and methods as 
practiced by state, county and local school authorities, and the important 
features of the Kansas school law. 

The Philosophy of Education. Seven and one-half hours. Four 
credits. 

This course will cover a careful discussion of the general aims and 
purposes of education. It will consider briefly the contribution of the 
great schools of science and art and discipline toward the relaxation of 
the general aim of education, and will attempt to lead the student to an 
understanding of how all the foregoing agencies are brought together 
in a larger unifying force. 

History of Education in the United States. Seven and one-half 
hours. Four credits. 

This course will include a consideration of the beginnings and the 
development of the various divisions and ranks of educational institu- 
tions in the United States. It will also give considerable attention to 
present-day tendencies in educational progress in this country. 

Vocational Education. Seven and one-half hours. Four credits. 
Elective. 

The development and significance of vocational education; careful 
study of trade and continuation schools in Germany, Massachusetts and 
elsewhere; practical schools of agriculture in France; folkehojskoler 
(people's high schools) in Denmark; agricultural colleges in the United 
States; Wisconsin and Minnesota county schools of agriculture and home 
economics ; the social and economic phases of vocational education for the 
producer; its relation to moral welfare and social conditions; its place in 
the city, town and county schools; outlining of tentative courses in shop 
work, agriculture and home economics for Kansas schools; the relation of 
vocational education to the other school subjects; plans, equipments and 
cost of .shop and laboratories. A study of the principles of pedagogy as 
applied to the teaching of vocational subjects in the high school and in 
the seventh and eighth grades. 

Vocational Guidance. Two hours. One credit, if taken with voca- 
tional education. 

A study of the need of vocational guidance for pupils in the seventh 
and eighth grades and the high schools; economic and social waste with- 
out guidance; a study of the economic and social possibilities of the dif- 
ferent vocations; how to study the vocations; bureaus of vocational 
guidance; the social engineer; the teachers as vocational counselors; a 
study of the literature on the subject. This course is especially intended 
for teachers of pupils in the upper grades and high schools, the high- 
school principals, village and ward-school principals, and superintendents 
of city schools. 

Principles of Education. 

Taking the purpose of education to be the preparation of the child for 
efficient participation in the life of society, the course aims at presenting 
the biological, psychological, economic, cultural and moral aspects of the 
educative process. Textbook, Ruediger: Principles of Education. 

Teaching Method. 

The aim of this course will be the development of good classroom tech- 
nique through a detailed study of child experience as related to the larger 
demands of education. The work will include lectures, library assign- 
ments and observation of classes. A feature of the course will be indi- 
vidual reports and discussions. 



294 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Educational Psychology. 

The course will deal with those aspects of psychology that have a direct 
bearing upon educational practices. Special attention will be paid to the 
results of experimental investigation in this field. Lectures and library 
work. 

ENGLISH 

Professor Seaeson 
Assistant Professor strum 
Instructor Davis 

Literature from the Readers. Eight hours. Four credits. 

This course is planned to meet the needs of teachers of rural and 
graded schools. The aim of the course is to stimulate the teacher's love 
for good literature until she becomes conscious of her power to interest, 
impress and inspire boys and girls. Reading is considered both as a 
fundamental means of acquiring knowledge and as a stepping-stone to the 
appreciation of the world's best literature. Special emphasis will be 
placed upon teaching children how to study the reading lesson and upon 
the necessity to use in the reading lessons more of the literature of rural 
life. One hour each week is devoted to special methods of teaching 
reading. 

Constructive English. Eight hours. Four credits. 

This course is of special value to grammar-grade and high-school 
teachers desiring to learn practical present-day methods of teaching 
language and composition. The aim of the course is to train the student 
to express his thoughts clearly and accurately. The assignments of work 
are based on the experience and vital interests of the students, thus 
stimulating clear thinking as a practical basis for clear-cut, effective 
writing. One hour a week is devoted to the discussion of special methods 
of teaching grammar-grade and high-school English, and to a definite 
working program in the teaching of English. 

American Literature. Eight hours. Four credits. 

This course is designed for those desiring to take a special cultural 
course in literature, and is open to all who have completed the course in 
college rhetoric or its equivalent. The course includes a rapid survey of 
American literature from colonial times to the present and the intensive 
study and' appreciation of the works of representative men of letters. 
Suggested supplementary readings enable the student to explore the 
richest fields of American literature. One hour a week is devoted to a 
consideration of current literature. 

High-school Classics. Eight hours. Four credits. 

This course is intended especially for those teaching or desiring to 
teach high-school English and literature. The class work consists of lec- 
tures by the instructor, supplementary readings, and of interpretation by 
the class of passages assigned for study. The aim of this course is to 
awaken warm, vital appreciation of the best literature for high schools, 
and- to inspire teachers to bring the deeper message of that literature to 
the hearts of the pupils. One hour each week is devoted to a discussion 
of the best methods of teaching literature and English in the high school. 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Doctor Welch 

General Economic Entomology. Class work, seven and one-half 
.hours. Four credits. 

This course is an elementary study of the dynamics of injurious in- 
sects. It consists of (1) a study of such structural features of insects as 
is necessary to the understanding of their elementary classifications, of 
their life history, and of the application of remedial measures; (2) a 



The Summer School 295 

study of the recognition marks, distribution, habits and life histories of 
the principal insect pests of the field, orchard and garden, domestic 
animals, and the household; (3) a study of the standard methods of their 
control. Several field trips are made to observe and study the habits of 
the insects in their natural environment. 

GERMAN 

Professor Ooeteltou 

Elementary German I. Seven and one-half hours. Four credits. 
Required in the course in home economics; elective in other courses. 

After two periods given to the acquisition of the sounds of the German 
letters, the student at once begins reading. Vocabularies are learned 
from the outset, while grammar is acquired gradually through reading. 
Oral and written work and simple conversational exercises begin with 
the first reading lesson. In the work of this term there is included the 
study of articles, prepositions, declensions of pronouns, the indicative 
mode of the verb, and sentence order. Frequent reviews enable the stu- 
dent to digest the facts presented, while the abundant conversation and 
written work subserves the same end. Text, Becker and Rhoades' Ele- 
ments of German (first twenty-five lessons). 

Elementary German II. Seven and one-half hours. Four credits. 
Required in the course in home economics ; elective in other courses. 

The remaining important points of grammar are studied. Students 
are repeatedly drilled on the grammatical constructions already empha- 
sized in Elementary German I. The general plan of the work is the same 
as in the preceding term. Essential facts of grammar are insisted upon, 
but German is taught as a living language. Conversational exercises in 
German and written translations from English into German are frequent. 
Prerequisite: Elementary German. Text, Becker and Rhoades' Ele- 
ments of German (completed) . 

German Readings. Seven and one-half hours. Four credits. Re- 
quired in the course in home economics ; elective in other courses. 

This course embraces readings of dialogue selections which deal in 
detail with German life, customs, history, and mythology. A few of the 
best and most popular song poems also are studied. Grammatical drill is 
also continued, with occasional sight readings and translations into Ger- 
man. Prerequisite: Elementary German II. Text, Bacon's Im Vater- 
land. 

German Comedies. Seven and one-half hours. Four credits. Elec- 
tive in the courses in general science, home economics, and agriculture. 

This course comprises the reading of recent one-act comedies of liter- 
ary merit, and of a realistic, lively, and cleanly humorous nature, includ- 
ing the following: Julius Rosen's Ein Knopf, Gustav von Moser's Ein 
amerikanisches Duell, Hugo Mueller's Im Warteslon erster Klasse, and 
Emil PohPs Die Schulreiterin. Exercises in conversation and sight read- 
ing are occasionally introduced. Prerequisite: German Readings. Text, 
Manley and Allen's Four German Comedies. 

HISTORY AND CIVICS 

Professor Price 
Instructor Ilbs 
Instructor James 

American History I. — To 1845. Seven and one-half hours. Four 
credits. 

This course will cover the industrial, constitutional, and political 
phases of our American history, including origin, foundation, evolution 
from colonial conditions to independence, the establishing of nationality, 
our westward expansion, and the questions of the middle period. Library 
readings and reports; lectures and quizzes. „ 



296 Kansas State Agricultural College 

American History II. — Since 1845. Seven and one-half hours. Four 
credits. 

This course continues the study of the industrial, constitutional and 
political phases of American history, beginning with the annexation of 
Texas, and an intensive study of the slavery issue. It includes especially 
the economic, social and industrial conditions and effects of the Civil 
War, covers the reconstruction era, and includes such a study of the new 
nation as to give the student a clear grasp of present-day problems. 
Library readings and reports; lectures and quizzes. Students in either 
this or the a«bove course are advised to bring any texts that they may 
possess on American history or government. 

English History. Seven and one-half hours. Four credits. 

A survey of the whole field, with special emphasis on the modern 
period. The Tudor and Stuart regimes, with their bearings on constitu- 
tional development and New World history; the growth and organization 
of the empire and the more recent industrial, social and political advances 
will be studied in detail. Based on Cheney as a text, with lectures and 
assigned readings. A good course to precede civics and American history. 

Ancient History, Teachers' Course. Seven and one-half hours. 
Four credits. 

This course will include a survey of Oriental history, with a special 
study of selected periods and phases. It will be based on a standard text, 
with lectures and assigned readings. Some attention will be given to 
problems of presentation. A brief portion of the time will be given to the 
examination and discussion of the various textbooks in general use and 
to helps of all kinds. This course is designed for those who expect to 
teach ancient history in the high schools, but should be of value and in- 
terest to any others who desire advanced work in this period of history. 

American Government. Seven and one-half hours. Four credits. 

A course in government and politics, with especial reference to the 
actual operation of local, state and national political machinery, and the 
newer devices fer securing a more effective popular control, such as the 
direct primary, initiative, referendum, short ballot, and recall. A com- 
parative study o*f the constitution and government of Kansas is supple- 
mented by a discussion of the present tendencies in legislation and ad- 
ministration. Recitations, lectures, assigned readings. Text, Beard, 
American Government and Politics; or Guitteau, Government and Poli- 
tics in the United States. 

Modern Europe. Seven and one-half hours. Four credits. 

A course in the development of modern Europe. The period before 
1648 is reviewed briefly, and special attention is given to the social and 
industrial development of the various nations since 1815, and to present 
international relations. This course is designed to meet the needs of the 
teacher, who, following the suggestions of the Committee of Five, prefers 
to emphasize the modern period in the high-school course in medieval 
and modern history. Recitations and assigned readings. Text, Robinson 
and Beard, Development of Modern Europe. 

MATHEMATICS 

Associate Professor Andrews 
Assistant Professor White 
Assistant Professor Stratton 

Algebra I. Eight hours. Four credits. 

A course in elementary algebra. The transition from arithmetic to 
algebra will receive careful attention. Text, First Course in Algebra, 
by Hawkes, Luby, and Touton. 



The Summer School 297 

Algebra II and III. Eight hours. Four credits. 

These courses are a continuation of elementary algebra, including "fehe 
general theory of the quadratic equation. Text, First Course in Algebra, 
by Hawkes, Luby, and Touton. 

Plane Geometry I. Eight hours. Four credits. 

The usual theorems and construction, including the general prop- 
erties of plane, rectlinear figures, the circle, the measurement of angles, 
similar polygons, arcs, regular polygons ; the solution of original exercises, 
including loci problems and the application to the mensuration of lines and 
plane surfaces. Text, Wentworth-S'mith Plane Geometry. 

Solid Geometry. Eight hours. Four credits. 

The usual theorems and construction, including the relation of the 
planes and lines in space, the properties and measurement of prisms, 
pyramids, cylinders, and cones, the sphere and the spherical triangle; the 
solution of many numerical and original exercises, including loci prob- 
lems; application to the mensuration of surfaces amd solids. The appli- 
cation of geometry to the arts and sciences will be made, and in par- 
ticular the use of engineering and architecture as problem sources will 
be shown. The course will proceed from the modern pedagogical and 
practical point of view. Text, Wentworth- Smith Plane and SoUd Geom- 
etry. 

Secondary Mathematics. Five hours. 

This course undertakes a critical examination of the mathematical 
field of the secondary school. This embraces a careful examination of 
the contents of secondary algebra, geometry, and trigonometry; an ex- 
tensive study of the reports of the International Committee on the Teach- 
ing of Mathematics; critical examination of various pedagogical theories 
of presenting secondary mathematics; secondary-school problems in 
mathematics; resources available for secondary instruction*; objective 
points in teaching algebra, geometry, and trigonometry; history and 
bibliography of secondary mathematics. Lectures, assigned readings, and 
reports. 

Plane Trigonometry. Eight hours. Four credits. 

Trignometric functions of any angle. Measurements of angles. So- 
lution of plane triangles. Functions of multiple and submultiple angles. 
Sum and difference formulas, trigonometric equations, and inverse func- 
tions. DeMoivre's theorem, trigonometric series, hyperbolic and expo- 
nential functions. The use of trigonometry as a scientific instrument and 
as a part of a liberal education will be emhpasized. Text, Rothrock's 
Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. 

Analytical Geometry. Eight hours. Four credits. 

The work of this course is confined to the plane, and includes a treat- 
ment of coordinate systems and applications, loci, the straight line, circle, 
parabola, ellipse, and hyperbola; also a brief consideration of secants, 
tangents, and normals. The subjects treated are those usually em- 
braced in a first course. Text, A brief Course in Analytic Geometry, by 
Tanner and Allen. 

Differential Calculus. Eight hours. Four credits. 

Following the usual introductory ideas, the principal topics taken up 
are the fundamental rules for differentiating standard forms, applica- 
tions, maxima and minima, curve tracing, curvature, and partial differ- 
entiation. Especial attention is given to the applications of the calculus 
to problems in geometry and mechanics. Textbook, Differential and In- 
tegral Calculus, by Granville. 



298 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Integral Calculus. Eight hours. Four credits. 

This course contains a discussion and practical use of formulas for in- 
tegrating standard forms, a treatment of the constant of integration, 
and the idea of the definite integral. Emphasis is placed upon the appli- 
cation to curves in problems involving areas, lengths, surfaces and vol- 
umes, rather than upon the various methods of integration. Attention 
is given to both single and multiple integration in connection with the 
usual problems in geometry and mechanics. Textbook, Differential and 
Integral Calculus, by Granville. 

MUSIC 

Professor Valley 

Rudiments of Music. Class work, four hours. 

This course takes up the staff, scale, signatures, ear-training, sight- 
reading, rhythm, singing, relationship of the different tones of the scale, 
and a great deal of practice and drill on the fundamentals in music. 

Primary Grades. Class work, four hours. 

A study of the best recreation and rote songs for the primary grades. 
Practice in singing and methods of presentation of recreation and rote 
songs. Treatment of monotones. Care of child's voice. 

Intermediate Grades. Class work, four hours. 

Exercises and songs best adapted to these grades. Melody and rhythm, 
chromatic and minor scales, etc. Best methods of presentation of music 
in these grades. Drill on fundamentals. Care of child's voice. 

Grammar and High-school Grades. Class work, four hours. 

Part songs, codas and choruses best adapted for young people in these 
grades. Drill and practice in singing. Best methods of presentation. 
Study of changing of young people's voices, range of voices, and care of 
children's voices. 

Voice Culture and Singing. 

Arrangements for individual instruction in voice culture and singing 
may be made by seeing Professor Valley. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Professor Lowman 
Instructor Hutto 

These courses are offered to meet the needs of teachers who wish 
to qualify themselves for more efficient direction of and instruction in 
physical education in the public schools. The courses are planned to meet 
the needs in both theoretical and practical phases of the work. The course 
in practical work will be beneficial to those who are interested in their 
own health development. Hours of credit will depend upon amount of 
work. 

I. — Physical Education in the Public Schools. 

This course will consist of lectures and discussions three times a week, 
with one hour for outside reading. History and development of physical 
education; present status. The development of the rational system of 
physical education. 

Elementary Schools. — Emphasis is placed on -the growth and develop- 
ment of the child, the factors controlling this growth and development, 
.and the place of motor activities among these factors. Organizations 
and methods discussed in detail. The introduction of rational gymnastics, 
plays, and games. 



The Summer School 299 

High Schools, — Following a summary and study of the characteristics 1 ;* 
tendencies and needs of adolescence, this course considers the exercises* 
to be used, the condition of the individual students, the methods of study- 
ing such conditions, the social and moral leadership necessary, and the ad- 
ministration of competitive exercises, especially athletic. 

II. — Playgrounds. 

Methods. — This course treats of the development of the playground 
movement in the United States; the necessity of the playground; play- 
grounds in the large city; in the small town; how to start and maintain 
playgrounds; supervisory organizations, location, construction, and ad- 
ministration. 

Suggestions to the playground directors in regard to (a) the educa- 
tional value of directed play, (6) equipment of the grounds, (c) publicity- 
work, (d) time and hours, (e) the daily playgrounds, (/) special days,,., 
(g) clubs, (h) government on the playground, (i) activities to eneourage>„ 
(j) the special games for the playground, with special emphasis to the- 
rural problem. 

PHYSICS 

Professor Hamilton 

Instructor Jenktbss 
Assistant Kaeuek 

Introductory Physics. Class work, nine hours; laboratory, two 
hours. 

This course is designed for those teachers who desire some knowledge 
of elementary physics and yet do not have time to take the three regular 
courses offered in this subject. The entire subject will be covered and 
some time given to working problems. Simple experiments and demon- 
strations will be given. The course will be a good review for those who 
have had high-school physics. Students who expect to take county exam- 
ination for certificates to teach are advised to take this course. No col- 
lege credit is given. Textbook, Milikan and Gale. 

Elementary Physics I. Class work, seven and one-half hours; lab- 
oratory work, two hours. Four credits. 

This course is intended to give a general view of the subjects of 
mechanics and sound. Special emphasis is placed upon those principles 
which will be met again in later work in the same or other sciences. 
Textbook, Milikan and Gale. Prerequisite: Algebra III. 

Elementary Physics II. Class work, seven and one-half hours; lab- 
oratory work, two hours. Four credits. 

This course includes a study of heat and light, and is a continuation of 
Elementary Physics I. Discussion of the most important laws involved 
in each of the above, together with the explanation of many every- 
day phenomena, is followed by problems. Prerequisite: Elementary 
Physics I. Textbook, Milikan and Gale. 

Elementary Physics III. Class work, seven and one-half hours; lab- 
oratory work, two hours. Four credits. 

This course is a continuation of Elementary Physics I and II, and in- 
cludes a study of magnetism and electricity. After a brief study of 
magnetism, the fundamental laws of electricity are studied and illus- 
trated, and the working principles of many of the electrical appliances 
in daily use are made subjects for class discussion. Prerequisite: Ele- 
mentary Physics I. Textbook, Milikan and Gale. 

Students receiving credit in any of the three elementary courses above 
may substitute the grade for similar required work in the School of Agri- 
culture. 



300 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Pedagogy of Physics. Class work, seven and one-half hours; labora- 
tory, four hours. Four credits. 

This course includes a study of the modern texts, manuals and methods 
in high-school physics. Students are given an opportunity to help as- 
semble apparatus and to assist in lecture demonstrations. The laboratory 
work will include the usual experiments required in the elementary 
course in physics. The purpose of the course is to discuss methods best 
adapted for the presentation of those topics which present special diffi- 
culty, to devise methods of illustrating and demonstrating the funda- 
mental principles, and to select from a large number of possible labora- 
tory experiments a list which might be used in any of our Kansas high 
schools. This course is intended for those who are either teaching or 
expect to teach physics in secondary schools. 

Electricity and Light. Class work, seven and one-half hours; lab- 
oratory, four hours. Four credits. 

An advanced course in electricity and light. The course is the 
same as is required of all engineering and general science students, 
and gives the student a working knowledge of the units employed in 
measuring current, the various methods of producing current, and 
acquaints him with the electrical appliances used in both current 
production and electrical measurements. The work in light covers the 
principal phenomena of light, with a study of light as an exact means of 
physical measurement. The laboratory work includes the work with 
generators and motors, photometers, lamp tests, spectrometer, and ad- 
vanced problems in both electrical measurements and light. Text, Kimball. 

Household Physics. Class work, seven and one-half hours. Four 
credits. 

A course of lectures and demonstrations, in which the laws relating to 
principles involved in appliances of the household are explained and illus- 
trated. The work in heat is based upon thermometry, calorimetry, radia- 
tion, absorption, and methods of refrigeration and ventilation. The 
course includes a study of light, with its color phenomena and actinic 
effects; of some of the optical instruments used in scientific work; a 
study of electric lighting and illumination, and of the cost of operating 
many of the appliances used in the home, including suggestions for the 
proper use and care of electrical apparatus for the protection of the 
appliance and of the operator. 

Photography. Class work, three hours ; laboratory, six hours. Three 
credits. 

The importance of a record of exact details, as shown in photograph, 
makes this work valuable to all scientists. The course gives the student 
some knowledge of the chemical and physical principles involved in the 
art, as well as practice in making good negatives and prints. The lecture 
and laboratory work deals with: things to be considered in selecting a 
camera; proper exposures; composition of pictures; proper development 
of plates; tests of different developers; retouching; reducing and in- 
tensifying negatives; printing and mounting; making lantern slides, 
bromide enlargement, and the prints best adapted for illustrated articles 
in newspapers and magazines. 



The Summer School 301 

ZOOLOGY 

Assistant Professor Ackert 

General Zoology. Class work, seven and one-half hours. Four 
credits. 

A study of types of animals selected to illustrate the development of 
the invertebrates, together with a series of field trips. The latter in- 
cludes excursions to ponds, streams, and meadows, where students collect 
their own material in order to become acquainted with habitats. Ani- 
mals found are studied in relation to their own species, and to other 
animals, including man. The field trips afford also an opportunity to 
become acquainted with the names, and, to some extent, the classification, 
habits and economic importance of the summer birds and a few of the 
common mammals. 



302 Kansas State Agricultural College 



Division of College Extension 

John Harold Miller, Dean. 



Until 1905 the work of college extension, in the form of 
farmers' institutes, was in charge of a farmers' institute com- 
mittee of the College. Applications for college lectures at 
the institutes were referred to this committee, and such mem- 
bers of the Faculty as happened to be available were detailed 
to attend the meetings. The State appropriation for institute 
work was small, no regular staff could be employed, and the 
institutes themselves were for the most part unorganized and 
of a temporary and sporadic character. The first step toward 
the development of the institute work was taken in the em- 
ployment by the Board of Regents of a superintendent, who 
assumed the responsibilities of the organization of the work 
in October, 1905. In July, 1906, the Department of Farmers' 
Institutes was formally organized by the Board of Regents. 
An energetic prosecution of the work of agricultural exten- 
sion had resulted in an awakened interest throughout the 
State, and in a legislative appropriation of $4000 in 1905, to 
which amount the College added $800. In 1907 the results of 
the extension work were seen to be so valuable that the legis- 
lature appropriated $11,500, to which the College added 
$1000. In 1909 the legislature, with unprecedented liberality, 
made an appropriation for agricultural extension work of 
$52,500, just five times the appropriation made by the pre- 
ceding legislature. The legislature of 1911 appropriated for 
this department $35,000 for the year ending June 30, 1912, 
and $40,000 for the year ending June 30, 1913. The legisla- 
ture of 1913 appropriated for the Division of College Exten- 
sion, $45,000 for the year ending June 30, 1914, and $50,000 
for the year ending June 30, 1915; 

The many developments of the extension work made it 
necessary, in the judgment of the Board of Regents, to create, 
in December, 1912, the Division of College Extension, consist- 
ing of four distinct sections — the Department of Farmers' 
Institutes and Demonstrations, the Department of Highway 
Engineering and Irrigation, the Department of Home Eco- 
nomics, and the Department of Correspondence-Study — each 
with its own head and staff; the Board of Regents made the 
Director of Extension, Dean of the Division of College Ex- 
tension. 

The principal value of the Agricultural College, as a teach- 
ing factor, must be in the training it is able to give to the 
young people who enter upon and continue through its courses 



Division of College Extension 303 

of study, in residence. The Agricultural Experiment Station, 
as a nutural adjunct to the College, has its great field in the 
discovery of new truths relating to agriculture. So long, how- 
ever, as the institution limits its efforts to these lines, it is 
evident that only a small proportion of the people of a state 
can derive direct and practical benefit from the work of the 
College. The progress of agricultural education would be 
slow indeed if the Agricultural College did not Offer other 
forms of instruction to the people of the State. The same 
economic principle that justified the expenditure of public 
funds for educating young people who are able to attend the 
College justifies a similar expenditure for the purpose of 
taking the College to those who are not able to come to it. 
State education is not philanthropy, but self-protection — fore- 
sight. An educated citizenship is a prosperous citizenship. 
The Kansas State Agricultural College, through its several 
lines of extension, conducted meetings during the year ending 
June 30, 1912, with an aggregate attendance of 349,967 people 
— more than one-fifth of the population of the State. 

While this work is directed by the Division of College Ex- 
tension, the scope would be very limited were it not for the co- 
operation of the other divisions and departments of the Col- 
lege in supplying speakers for institutes, assistants in various 
lines of demonstration work, teachers for movable schools, and 
wise counsel in the various lines of public effort. 



Farmers' Institutes and Demonstrations 

Edw. 0. Johnson - , Superintendent 

P. E. Obabtbee, Farm Crops 

0. H. Taylor, Animal Husbandry 

G-eo. O. Greene, Horticulture 

A. S. Neale, Dairy Husbandry 

W. A. Boys, Demonstration Agent, West Central Kansas 

Lee H. Gould, Demonstration Agent, Southwestern Kansas 

H. J. Bower, Demonstration Agent, Southeastern Kansas 

H. T. Nielson, Demonstration Agent, Northwestern Kansas 

The farmers' institutes of the State have regular officers, constitutions 
and by-laws, and are required by law to meet at least annually. Many of 
these organizations also hold six or more monthly meetings. The College 
plans to send one or more speakers to present at a meeting certain well- 
defined lessons in some branch of agriculture. The speakers and their 
subjects are chosen because of a known need or interest in a particular 
community, and with a view to starting or encouraging certain definite 
lines of agricultural work. Effort has been made to build up a fixed 
membership in these institutes, and the list of members reported to this 
department up to March 1, 1914, is about 16,000. This membership roll 
constitutes the mailing list for the regular pamphlets issued by this 
department to the members of the farmers' institutes. In addition to 
these pamphlets, each member who fills out and returns a membership 
blank will receive from the College, from the Government, or from some 
State Experiment Station such other obtainable literature as his interests 



304 Kansas State Agricultural College 

demand. Each year some special topic, such as live stock, plant breeding, 
gardening, orcharding, or dairying, is made especially prominent in insti- 
tute programs, either for the whole State or for certain specified districts. 
Special meetings are held by approximately two-thirds of the institutes, 
for the discussion, on certain designated days, of special subjects, such 
as "Alfalfa/' "Poultry," "Good Roads," "Seed Selection," "Silos and 
Silage," "The Farm Horse," etc. 

The programs for all regular meetings are based on suggestive out- 
lines sent out by the Institute Department. When these are returned by 
the local committees, the programs and posters are printed and sent out 
free. The department furnishes literature, on request, for members who 
are to take part in the program of an institute, a grange, or other organ- 
ization. During the campaign beginning September 1, 1913, and ending 
March 15, 1914, the College assisted in the holding of 1.83 two-day insti- 
tutes and 221 one-day institutes — a total of 404 institutes, having an 
aggregate attendance of more than 73,320 farmers, with their families. 

MONTHLY MEETINGS 

One of the most important features of the farmers' institute work in 
this State is the custom of having each farmers' institute organization 
hold from six to nine monthly meetings. These meetings are held usually 
on the afternoon of the second Saturday of each month from September 
to May. The Department of Farmers' Institutes suggests the subject for 
discussion, and the same subject is to be discussed in each and every 
institute in the State. In this way certain very important subjects have 
been discussed by thousands of farmers at seasonable times, looking to 
somewhat general unanimity of action. The subjects discussed at these 
monthly meetings have included such as "Home Orchard," "The Silo," 
"Seed-bed Preparation for Corn," "Seed-bed Preparation for Wheat," 
"Care of Brood Sow and Litter," "Sorghum," "Road Improvement," 
"Consolidation of Rural Schools," etc. The department has made a re- 
quirement that every institute must hold at least three of these monthly 
meetings, in addition to the annual meeting, before being entitled to aid 
from the county. 

DEMONSTRATION FARMING 

General Field Demonstrations. After speakers from the Agricul- 
tural College have attended institute meetings and discussed certain 
methods of farming, requests have come from farmers that the College 
send men into those communities to put to a practical test the theories 
advocated. Therefore, four or five members of the department have 
usually spent the time from March to July in various field demonstrations, 
including pruning and spraying orchards, building silos, inspecting dairy 
herds, making plans for dairy barns, visiting farmers and advising as to 
farm management. 

District Demonstration Agents. In addition to the advisory demon- 
stration work indicated in the preceding paragraph, the College has em- 
ployed four district demonstration agents, one with headquarters at 
Norton, with demonstration work in several counties in the northwestern 
corner of the State. Another district demonstration agent has heen 



Division of College Extension 305 

located at Hays, conducting work in counties along the Union Pacific lines 
in western Kansas. A third district demonstration agent has been located 
at Dodge City, conducting demonstrations in the counties in the south- 
western part of the State, the College being assisted in salary and ex- 
penses by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company and the 
United States Department of Agriculture. A fourth district demonstra- 
tion agent has been assigned several counties in southeastern Kansas, 
with headquarters at Parsons, the College being assisted here by the 
United States Department of Agriculture. These men conduct demonstra- 
tions on from four to six farms in each county in the assigned territory 
in the growing of crops and in the feeding of stock. 

County Demonstration Agents. The College has assisted in the 

location of five county demonstration agents in the following counties: 

' Leavenworth, Montgomery, Cowley, Allen, and Harvey. The College, 

however, assumes no expense for the work of these agents, but directs the 

various demonstrations. 

BOYS' AND GIRLS' CONTESTS 

In the hope of creating a keener interest in rural life, contests in 
growing corn, potatoes, etc., and in baking, fruit canning, and sewing 
were inaugurated. They are usually considered a part of the work of the 
farmers' institutes and are for the most part conducted by these organiza- 
tions. Prizes are arranged for, which in some counties aggregate as much 
as $400. Prizes for boys and girls fifteen years old and over are given in 
the form of free trips to the State institute held at the Agricultural Col- 
lege each winter. This is clearly educational work, and many county 
school superintendents state that these contests in corn, bread, etc., have 
stimulated the entire year's work of country schools. Beginning with 
1911, the rules for the contest were changed, and three additional recom- 
mendations were made: (1) Each boy shall plant one acre of corn, from 
which his ten ears must be selected for the contest. (2) Any boy may join 
a yield contest, provided he notify the executive committee of his institute, 
on or before the first of October, that he thinks his acre will yield, for all 
territory east of the Sixth Principal Meridian, seventy-five bushels, for 
the next three counties west (to the west line of Barton and Smith coun- 
ties), sixty bushels, and in all territory farther west, forty bushels per 
acre, of corn or kafir. (3) Institute committees are urged to introduce, 
for boys between the ages of seventeen and twenty-two, a five-acre con- 
test; the contestant to notify the committee on or before the first of Octo- 
ber that he thinks his corn will yield seventy-five, sixty, or forty-five 
bushels per acre, according to territory. The College recommends that 
the prize for the one winner in this contest be $50 cash on condition that 
the winner attend the Farmers' Short Course at the Agricultural College 
for ten weeks. 

BOYS' AND GIRLS' MEETINGS 

The College is inaugurating a system of special meetings for the boys 
and girls who engage in the various contests. This work will usually be 
conducted in the form of a county campaign, consisting of four or six 
afternoon meetings a week, for the purpose of reaching the boys and 
girls engaged in the various contests. "When these young people become 



306 Kansas State Agricultural College 

sufficiently interested the representatives of the College will assist them 
in forming organizations to be known as boys' good farming clubs 
and girls' home economics clubs. The College is also organizing, in 
towns and villages of the State, "boys' poultry clubs" and "boys' garden 
clubs." "Girls' flower clubs" will also be organized where there are no 
"city beautiful leagues." Special circuits will be arranged for these boys' 
and girls' meetings, similar to those of the regular farmers' institutes, 
and the officers of these clubs will report to a College official as do the 
officers of the institutes. 

MOVABLE SCHOOLS IN AGRICULTURE 

As a means of intensifying the work of the farmers' institutes, 
movable schools are to be held in those communities that have high 
institute records. Schools will be conducted in dairying, poultry, 
orcharding, stock judging and breeding, corn culture, road making, 
and concrete construction. These schools will continue for three days, 
from nine A. M. to four P. M. There must be a membership of not 
less than twenty-five nor more than forty, and each member must pay 
a fee of one dollar to meet the necessary expenses. Where- a class of sixty 
is formed, two instructors will be sent and two courses will be offered. 
In case a single school possesses a total membership of sixty men and 
forty women, the instruction may be continued for a period of five days. 

SCHOOL CAMPAIGNS 

A state campaign for agricultural education would be incomplete if it 
did not affect the rural schools. According to a recent legislative enact- 
ment, all teachers are hereafter required to take an examination in ele- 
mentary agriculture. It is not required that agriculture be taught in the 
rural schools of the State, but within the next two years it will undoubt- 
edly become a part of the daily course of study of every school in Kansas. 
In cooperation with the county school superintendents and institute 
workers, the Agricultural College is each year holding "schoolhouse cam- 
paigns" in a few counties, for the purpose of stimulating interest in 
agriculture among children, teachers, and patrons. In these campaigns 
the College representative is usually able to speak in four schoolhouses 
each day, and to give a lecture in the evening, either in a rural school- 
house or in some village. The representatives sent to the different coun- 
ties are chosen with reference to the prevailing interests of the respective 
localities. 

AGRICULTURAL TRAINS 

The College has enjoyed for several years the cooperation of the 
leading railroads of Kansas in the matter of special educational trains, 
such as corn, alfalfa, wheat, dairy, drainage, and good roads trains. 
By this means it has been possible to meet many thousands of people 
and to impress upon them in a forceful way the importance of seed 
selection, of improved methods of culture, of the value of better dairy 
stock, silos, etc. 

COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATIONS 

Another form of effort to make practical the instructions given in the 
farmers' institutes is the organization of cooperative breeding associa- 
tions, fruit growers' associations, vegetable growers' associations, com- 



Division of College Extension 307 

munity breeding associations, etc. Year by year greater effort is being 
made to induce farmers to put into practical operation the plans dis- 
cussed at the meetings. 

EXHIBITS AT FAIRS 
For four years the Department of Farmers' Institutes and Demonstra- 
tions has been preparing and furnishing for county fairs a very complete 
exhibit relating to agriculture and home economics, the exhibit consisting 
of from fourteen to sixteen large boxes containing charts, photographs 
and other illustrative material, illustrating important agricultural experi- 
ments and important agricultural and economic information. 

PUBLICATIONS 
Since definite subjects are selected for each year's institute work, 
with a view to bringing about a certain unanimity of action, it seems 
appropriate that some of these subjects be treated more at length, be 
published in pamphlet form, and then be mailed to all institute members. 
These pamphlets were first issued as special numbers of The Industrialist, 
but later, under the name of Agricultural Education, were entered in 
the post office as a regular periodical. There is a membership fee in 
all institutes; all members receive free from four to six or more 
numbers of the periodical during each year. A large edition *of each 
number is printed, and back numbers are mailed to new members until 
the supply is exhausted. 



Highway Engineering and Irrigation 

W. S. Q-earhabt, State Highway Engineer 
H. B. Walkeb, Drainage and Irrigation 
A. R. Losh, Assistant Engineer 
C. I. Felps, Assistant Engineer 
W. J. King, Assistant Engineer 

HIGHWAY ENGINEERING 

It is eminently proper that the Agricultural College should maintain a 
trained highway engineer who is primarily the State adviser for county 
and city officials on matters relating to roads and bridges. He makes 
plans and specifications for bridges and culverts and advises as to their 
location. He examines proposed highway improvements, and, if it is 
desired, makes plans and specifications for such road work, whether the 
improvement contemplates the use of macadam, oil, or sand-clay, or is 
simply to be an improved earth road. Later, if desired, he will inspect all 
bridge and road work on its completion, and report its condition to the 
proper county or city officials. All such work is done without charge to 
the local community, other than for actual traveling expenses. When 
other work will permit, he also advises bridge contractors, and furnishes 
plans., specifications, etc., on the same terms as to officials, except that 
the contractor will be charged the actual cost of a draftsman's time in 
drawing the plans. 

DRAINAGE AND IRRIGATION ENGINEERING 
It has been found by careful investigation that there are more than 
twenty counties in eastern Kansas where large areas of valuable land 
are in great need of systematic tile drainage. In October, 1910, the 



308 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Agricultural College employed, and Is now maintaining, a public drainage 
engineer whose duties are outlined much as are the duties of others con- 
nected with this department — attending farmers 7 institutes from October 
to March, and from March to October advising with farmers, county sur- 
veyors, and engineers, relative to the best and most economical plans of 
straightening creeks and rivers, and draining fields and farms, and of 
developing plants for farm irrigation. To this engineer are assigned 
all problems relating to farm irrigation and land drainage. His services 
are absolutely free other than the usual charge for traveling and local 
expenses. 



Home Economics 

Frances L. Brown 
Florence Snell 
Adah Lewis 
Edith Allen 

While thousands of young women have had residence instruction in 
domestic science at the Agricultural College, there are still many other 
thousands who have been unable to take advantage of the excellent facili- 
ties which the College possesses in this field. Therefore, the Division of 
College Extension employs four competent teachers and demonstrators 
in this subject, to carry instruction in home economics to these absent 
ones. These teachers attend farmers' institutes for the regular institute 
period of five months, hold "movable schools" for three months, and then 
hold "women's meetings," and attend teachers' institutes, chautauquas, 
grange meetings, women's club meetings, etc., the rest of the year. At 
all times an extensive correspondence is carried on with the women and 
girls of the State. Girls' home economics clubs are also organized in 
high schools and in rural neighborhoods, using regular cooking and sew- 
ing lessons sent out from the department. Correspondence with women's 
clubs is also invited relative to occasional lessons in cookery, for which 
printed lessons are sent on request. 

MOVABLE SCHOOLS IN HOME ECONOMICS 

The College is able to reach a limited number of persons by means of its 
actual class and laboratory work. The institute program reaches many 
more with its system of lectures and addresses. In addition, the movable 
schools in home economics, giving definite courses of instruction which 
occupy at one place a period of one week, enable the College to carry its 
educational services directly to the homes of the people. These schools 
continue during a single week; from 1:15 P.M., Monday, to 11:45 a.m., 
Saturday. The sessions of the schools of economics are conducted accord- 
ing to the following program: cookery, from 9 to 11:45; sewing, from 
1:15 to 3:45; "round table" for the public, from 4 to 5. For a course to 
be organized, it" should have not less than twenty and not more than forty 
members. A fee of one dollar a member is paid to the local committee 
for the purchase of supplies, and for the entertainment of the two College 
teachers who conduct the class. No visitors are permitted until after the 
conclusion of the day's work, at 3:45 P. M. The sessions of the schools 
are held in the months of March, April, May, and September. 



Division of College Extension 309 

GIRLS' HOME ECONOMICS CLUBS 

The College is able to give personal instruction in home economics each 
year to only about eight hundred girls; through the movable schools it 
is not likely- that more than five hundred women and girls can be reached 
annually with the limited instruction that can be given by the present 
force of teachers during the periods of one week each; through the 
farmers' institutes and women's institutes, not more than five thousand 
women are likely to receive the information that can be given in the more 
or less formal discussions ; through correspondence courses it is not prob- 
able that more than a few hundred persons will be reached. The College 
is, therefore, undertaking in addition the work of organizing hundreds of 
girls' home economics clubs in town and village high schools, and in 
rural communities. A certificate is granted to a club having six charter 
members, although better results are likely to follow from a larger mem- 
bership. Printed lessons in cooking and sewing are supplied by the sec- 
retary of the club, together with blanks for reports, which are to be 
handed in after each lesson. Literature relating to the work being con- 
ducted is sent by the College to the individual members of the clubs. In 
a limited way this is a form of correspondence study, and girls can to a 
certain extent be prepared for either the regular correspondence courses, 
for domestic science work in high school or college, or for their usual 
home duties. The work also prepares the way for the regular teaching 
of domestic science and art in the high schools of the State. It is hoped 
that it may be arranged for a College representative to visit these clubs 
annually. A small charge, to be paid the College, is required of each 
club organized under the College auspices. 



Correspondence Study 

J. O. Werner, Director 
Geo. E. Brat, Assistant 

The Kansas State Agricultural College offers to the men and boys and 
the women and girls of Kansas an opportunity to study agriculture, home 
economics, mechanic arts, and farm engineering at home, alone, or in 
groups, believing that it is as much a part of the province of the institu- 
tion to offer such instruction to those who can not attend the College 
class as it is to offer instruction to those who are able to undertake studies 
at the College. Opportunity is therefore offered for systematic study by 
correspondence in many subjects which have a direct bearing upon the 
problems of the farm and the home. 

Three lines of work are offered for the purpose of helping those who 
have only limited time to study on any particular subject, but who need 
help, and then more extended courses for those who have more time. An 
oportunity is also offered for those who wish to study with the idea of 
securing college credit. 



310 Kansas State Agricultural College 

FOR WHOM INTENDED 

The correspondence courses here outlined should be of especial interest 
to the following classes of persons : 

(1) Boys and girls who have completed the common-school course of 
study, but who can not immediately attend a high school or other pre- 
paratory school. 

(2) Young men and women who feel that their school days are over, 
but who have aspirations, not yet satisfied, for a better education. 

(3) Men and women of middle life who wish to know more of the 
sciences of the farm and of the home. 

(4) Men who have been farming along general lines, but who have 
developed an interest in some special kind of work, such as orcharding or 
dairying, and who wish to direct their attention chiefly to that field. 

(5) Road supervisors who need to know more of the science of road 
making, the building of culverts, etc., but who can not afford to stop their 
work and take a special course. 

(6) Men and women who have passed middle life, who are about to 
retire from active farming, but who intend to keep their minds young 
by study, and who desire to enrich their own experience by adding to 
what they themselves have gained a knowledge of what has been dis- 
covered by others. 

(7) Capitalists and business men who are holding investments in 
lands, and who should know how to make those investments increase 
in value. 

(8) Teachers who desire to teach agriculture or home economics in 
special classes, or who wish to learn how to enrich their teaching in the 
sciences. 

Only a small percentage of the farming population of Kansas is able 
to attend the classes in the Agricultural College; in all, about 100,000 
people attend the farmers' institutes; a few hundred attend the movable 
schools. There still remain nearly a million adult people living in the 
country, few of whom have ever read carefully a single book on farm 
crops, dairying, horticulture, farm drainage, or the like. The College is 
now prepared to offer correspondence courses in the following subjects: 

READING COURSES 

Alfalfa. Injurious Insects, Orchard. 

Beef Production. Orcharding. 

Breeds of Cattle. Potato Growing. 

Breeds of Horses. Poultry Disease Prevention. 

Breeds of Sheep and Swine. Poultry Feeding and Housing. 

Canning and Preserving. Rural Hygiene. 

Care of Children. Sanitation and Health. 

Corn. Sheep Feeding. 

Dry Land Farming. Sheep Raising. 

Farm Dairying. Silos and -Silage. 

Hog Raising. Soils. 

Home Decoration. Sorghum Crops. 

Household Bacteriology. Stock Feeding. 

Incubating and Brooding, Study of Child Life. 

Injurious Insects, Field.- Tree Planting. 

Injurious Insects, Garden. 



Division of College Extension 



311 



EXTENSION COURSES 



Animal Breeding. 

Automobiles. 

Blacksmithing. 

Carpentry and Building. 

Civics/ 

Concrete Construction. 

Cookery. 

Dairy Manufacturing. 

Elementary Architectural Drawing. 

Elementary Woodworking. 

Farm Blacksmithing. 

Farm Builders. 

Farm Dairying. 

Farm Drainage. 

Farm Machinery. 

Farm Mechanics. 

Farm Woodworking. 

Foundry Practice. 

Gasoline Engines. 



Gasoline and Kerosene Traction En- 
gines. 
Highway Construction. 
Home Nursing. 
Home Sanitation. 
Household Management. 
Insects Injurious to Farm Crops. 
Insects Injurious to. Orchard Crops. 
Landscape Gardening. 
Machine Shop Work. 
Pattern Making. 
Plumbing. 
Sewing. 

Shop Mechanical Drawing. 
Shop Mathematics. 
Soils. 

Steam Boilers and Engines. 
Steam Traction Engines. 
Stock Feeding. 



COURSES GIVING COLLEGE CREDIT 



Algebra. 

Ancient History. 

Animal Breeding. 

Elementary Agriculture. 

English Classics. 

English Readings. 

Evolution of Domestic Animals. 

Farm Crops. 

Floriculture. 

Forage Crops III. 

Forestry, Farm. 

Fruit Growing. 

Geology. 

Geometrical Drawing. 

Geometry, Plane. 



Geometry, Solid. 

History of Education. 

Manual Training Drawing. 

Medieval History. 

Methods of Teaching. 

Modern History. 

Philosophy of Education. 

Poultry Management. 

Projection Drawing. 

Rural Sociology. 

School Law and Management. 

Sociology. 

The American Nation. 

Vegetable Gardening. 

Vocational Education. 



312 Kansas State Agricultural College 



Student Organizations 



STUDENT COUNCIL 

The student council is a representative body which was organized by 
the students in 1909 and received official sanction from the Board of 
Regents and the Faculty of the College. Its objects are: "(1) To act as 
a representative body before the governing officers of the College in all 
matters that concern the individual students, student organizations, or 
the student body as a whole; (2) to act as a body of mediation between 
different student organizations or enterprises whenever such service is 
sought by such organizations or enterprises; (3) to take cognizance of all 
matters that pertain to the good name and scholarship of the student 
body, to the end that high standards of honor on the campus and else- 
where may be maintained." 

This student council consists of four members elected from the senior 
class, three from the junior, two from the sophomore, and one from the 
freshman class. In addition, the School of Agriculture elects a delegate, 
who has the privilege of speaking on subjects pertaining to his school, 
but has no vote. At each meeting of the council a committee of the College 
Faculty may also be present to participate in the discussions. The mem- 
bers of the council are elected each term, but at each election at least two 
of the representatives of the senior class and one of those of the junior 
class must be reelected. 

The student council occupies an interesting and valuable place in the 
College life, and as a whole may be said to be an unqualified success in 
establishing a system of representative government among the students 
touching affairs peculiarly their own, and also in matters involving the 
Faculty. All acts of the council are submitted to the President of the 
College, and if they concern the rules, regulations, or ordinances of the 
College, are subject to approval by the proper governing body. The 
council is especially helpful in maintaining a high standard of honor 
among the students in both individual and organized relations. As a 
means of securing a better understanding in matters likely to cause fric- 
tion between the student body and the Faculty, the council performs a 
most important function. 

THE CHRISTIAN ASOCIATIONS 
The Young Men's Christian Association and the Young Women's 
Christian Association are organizations of the greatest worth and value 
in the College community, forming centers of moral culture and religious 
stimulus among the young men and women during their developmental 
period. As is well known, the Christian associations in colleges stand for 
the best ideals among the students, and are always accorded the cordial 
support of the authorities. In addition to general moral and spiritual 
development, the College Christian associations are of practical and 



Student Organizations 313 

efficient influence among the students in many directions. Membership 
in these associations is limited to persons connected with Protestant 
evangelical churches, but others are admitted as associate members. 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

The College Y. M. C. A. has always been a strong and influential body 
among the students. Its growth may be indicated by the fact that the 
organization was able in 1908 to erect a handsome building for its pur- 
poses at a cost of $35,000, on the corner of Eleventh and Fremont streets, 
near the College grounds. 

This building contains reading rooms, eighteen students' living rooms, 
a dining hall, and a gymnasium 42 x 70 feet, provided with lockers, 
baths, etc. The building with its conveniences is open free to all students, 
although a small fee of five dollars a year is charged for the use of the 
gymnasium and baths. One of the useful and practical features of the 
Y. M. C. A. is a students' employment bureau, which is maintained for 
the benefit of all students seeking employment. The religious work of the 
organization includes various courses for the study of the Bible and the 
work of Christian missions, which are maintained through the winter. 
The regular religious meetings of the association occur on Thursday 
evenings from 6:45 to 7:30, while occasional Sunday afternoon meetings 
are also held. Special meetings and receptions, which serve to broaden 
the acquaintanceship of the students and promote good-fellowship, are 
arranged from time to time. Especial attention is given the new students 
©n and after their arrival, and assistance is rendered in securing rooms 
and boarding places for them. The association maintains a regulr sec- 
retary, with whom prospective students are cordially encouraged to 
correspond. Address, General Secretary, Y. M. C. A., Kansas State 
Agricultural College, Manhattan, Kan. 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Similar in aim and purpose to the organization of the young men is 
the Young Women's Christian Association. The Y. W. C. A. home, at 
905 Fremont street, is the permanent headquarters of the association, to 
which all young women of the College are at all times heartily welcome. 
An office for the secretary and a girls' rest room are also maintained 
during the College year on the first floor, southwest corner, of the 
Domestic Science and Art Building. The rooms at the College are open 
to visitors at any hour of the day and are attractively furnished with 
conveniences for rest and study. 

At the association home, informal gatherings and entertainments lend 
variety and cheer to the life of the young women members and their 
friends. 

An employment bureau for women students is maintained by the gen- 
eral secretary, without charge to its beneficiaries. Various committees 
are responsible for the lines of work of the association. One of the 
most practical of these is the investigation of cases of illness among the 
College girls, and the rendering of assistance when necessary. At the 
beginning of the College terms the incoming trains are met by a com- 
mittee of girls wearing purple bows, by means of which they may easily 



314 Kansas State Agricultural College 

be recognized. This committee engages in assisting new women students 
in securing suitable lodging and boarding places. 

During the College year various social functions are held; for the 
benefit of the College women. The first of these is an informal reception, 
held on the first Friday following the opening of College, in order to 
enable the College girls to become better acquainted with one another. 
Once each year, in the winter term, the two associations entertain jointly. 

The religious life of the Young Women's Association is fostered by 
weekly religious meetings, by courses in the study of the Bible, and in 
special Sunday services, for which outside speakers are often obtained. 
Courses for the study of mission work are also conducted. 

THE NEWMAN CLUB 

The Newman Club, an organization of Catholic students, holds a social 
meeting every other Friday evening, and on the alternate Friday even- 
ings the time is devoted to some line of religious study under the direc- 
tion of the local pastor. The College authorities recognize this Bible study 
by allowing a two-hour credit for it when properly certified. In further 
recognition of the club's efforts the College has placed a set of the new 
Catholic Encyclopedia on its library shelves. Furthermore, the club has 
purchased and placed in the College library nearly one-hundred dollars' 
worth of Catholic books and pamphlets. 

The club is now on a sound basis and is qualifying for affiliation with 
a national organization of Newman clubs of the various state universities 
and colleges. Its aim is to favorably influence new Catholic students in 
the knowledge and practice of their faith, to foster sound morality and 
good character. 

LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETIES 
The literary societies of the College, eight in number, are wholly 
students' organizations, holding weekly meetings in the College buildings. 
The Alpha Beta and Franklin societies are open to both sexes; the 
Ionian, Eurodelphian, and Browning societies admit only young women 
to membership, while the Webster, Hamilton, and Athenian societies 
admit young men only. Students are encouraged to join one of these 
organizations for the sake of practice in the use of language, training 
in debate, and general experience in conducting meetings and in dealing 
with their fellows. These societies jointly maintain a debating council 
which cooperates with a Faculty committee in arranging for all inter- 
collegiate and interstate debates participated in by representatives of the 
College. The oratorical board, similarly maintained by these societies, 
arranges for the intersociety and intercollegiate oratorical contests. 

THE SCIENCE CLUB 
This is an organization of instructors and students for the promotion 
and advancement of science at the College. Membership is open to all 
persons interested in science. The meetings are held on the first Monday 
evening of each month in the lecture room of the Department of Chem- 
istry in Physical Science Hall. All papers given at these meetings repre- 
sent original work in science done at the institution. The program is 
further characterized by free discussion of the papers presented and by 
general scientific notes and news contributed by the members. 



Student Organizations 315 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OP ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS 
This national organization of electrical engineers has a College branch, 
which holds its meetings on the first Tuesday evening of each month in 
the rooms of the Department of Electrical Engineering on the first floor 
of Physical Science Hall. At these meetings papers and discussions of, 
professional interest are presented. Membership is confined to instructors 
:;md students in electrical engineering. 

THE AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION 

The Agricultural Association, composed of students especially in- 
terested in agricultural progress, holds meetings every two weeks, on 
Monday evening, in Fairchild Hall. This organization has steadily in- 
creased in numbers and interest until it is a potent and progressive 
factor in spreading the gospel of agricultural betterment. 

THE CADET CORPS 

Under the provisions of the Morrill act of 1862, under which the Col- 
lege was founded, instruction in military science and tactics is obliga- 
tory. Military science and drill are required of all men students in the 
freshman and sophomore years. This body of young men is formed into 
a cadet corps, organized into two battalions of infantry, under the com- 
mand of a United States regular army officer in active service, tempo- 
rarily detailed to this duty. The cadet corps is officered by upper class- 
men and constitutes a body under excellent discipline and training, and 
•of attractive military bearing. 

The uniforms are of the West Point pattern, and the insignia of rank 
:are those of the United States infantry. The uniform is required to be 
worn while on military duty by all students subject to the drill regula- 
tions, and by reason of its neat appearance and serviceable character it 
is also quite frequently used by the under classmen for daily wear. Mil- 
itary discipline and training for a short time in a student's life has 
undoubted value in creating habits of obedience, neatness, and precision. 

THE COLLEGE BAND 

The College band is a military organization, composed of cadets 
assigned to this duty for the College year in lieu of drill and technical 
military instruction. The band is limited in its membership, and attend- 
ance of the members upon its exercises is obligatory. It has proved an 
effective aid to the cadet corps, stimulating a love for martial music, and 
affording an attractive feature of the various public ceremonial occasions 
at the College. 

THE COLLEGE ORCHESTRA 

The orchestra is a student organization connected with the Depart- 
ment of Music, membership in which is voluntary. Its daily training 
under competent leadership results in the acquisition of a considerable 
repertoire of musical compositions of the best quality. Those connected 
with the orchestra obtain in this way familiarity with the works of 
many of the great composers, and among the students at large the orches- 
tra is an efficient aid in cultivating a taste for and an appreciation of 
good music. 



316 Kansas State Agricultural College 

ATHLETIC ORGANIZATIONS 

By means of the new gymnasium the College is now prepared to give 
complete physical as well as mental training. This building, which is 
equipped with all the usual accessories, assists in developing and main- 
taining physical tone and health in the student body. In addition to the 
gymnasium classes, and physical training in the military corps of cadets, 
all young men are encouraged to develop their physical skill by playing on 
practice teams in various athletic lines. In the fall, football teams are 
organized; in the fall and winter basketball; while in the spring baseball, 
tennis, and track athletics prevail. Every possible encouragement is 
given all students desirous of participating in these games to enter the 
practice teams and receive the necessary instruction. The most pro- 
ficient of these have opportunity to enter the first teams and participate 
in intercollegiate contests. The College authorities encourage all reason- 
able and sane athletic development, as a means for the training of 
physical qualities desirable in men everywhere. Professionalizing ten- 
dencies are strictly repressed, and the athletic rules adopted by the 
Faculty prevent, by proper regulation, all participation in intercollegiate 
games on the part of students deficient in their studies. 

The women sudents have equal opportunity for general physical train- 
ing with the young men. In the gymnasium, under a physical director, 
they receive training suitable to their needs. Basketball and tennis 
teams are organized among the young women. 



LIST OF STUDENTS 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

CANDIDATES FOR MASTER'S DEGREE, 1914 

Nellie Aberle, B. S. 1912 (Kansas State Agricultural College), English Language, English 
Literature 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Roy Brown, D. V. M. 1911 (Iowa State College), Bacteriology, Pathology, German 

Belleville, Republic county 
Edwin Henry Hungerford, B. S. 1912 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Chemistry, 
Bacteriology 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Catherine Laura Justin, B. S. 1912 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Some Economics 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Venus Kimble, B. S. 1908 (Kansas State Agricultural College), English Language, English 
Literature 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Katherine Neale, B. S. 1909 (Ohio University), Education, German 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Edgar Allen Vaughn, B. S. 1912 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Entomology, Zoology 

Toronto, Woodson county 
Don Bion Whelan, B. S. 1910 (Hillsdale College), Entomology, Zoology 

Manhattan, Riley county 

OTHER GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Hattie Julia Abbott, B. S. 1913 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Some Economics, 
Education 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Elva Akin, B. S. 1905 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Some Economics, Education 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Walter Albert Buck, B. S. 1908 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Engineering, Chemistry 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Leland David Bushnell, B. S. 1905 (Michigan Agricultural College), Chemistry 

Manhattan, Riley county 
John Willard Calvin, B. S. 1906 (Kansas State Agricultural Oollege), Chemistry 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Jane Mary Dow, B. S. 1911 (Kansas State Agricultural College), English Language, Latin 

Manhattan, Riley county 
■Lelia Dunton, B. S. 1910, M.S. 1912 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Chemistry 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Oliver Archie Findley, B. S. 1911 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Physics, Mathe- 
matics, Drawing 

Manhattan, Riley county 
James Burger Fitch, B. S. 1910 (Purdue University), Animal Nutrition 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Carlotta Marks Ford, A. B. 1911 (University of Illinois), Animal Nutrition 

Geneva, 111. 
Ivy Fuller, B. S. 1913 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Education 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Carrie May Gates, B.. S. 1911 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Some Economics 

Asherville, Mitchell county 
Lura Gilmore, B. S. 1913 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Education 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Mrs. Marietta Gish, B. S. 1912 (Kansas State Agricultural College), General Science 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Edith Lois Givens, B. S. 1913 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Education, Sistory 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Ethel Goheen, B. S. 1913 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Education 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Willis Larton Goldsmith, B. S. 1908 (Washburn), Education 

Manhattan, Riley county 

(317) 



318 Kansas State Agricultural College 

Frank Alfred G-ougler, B. S. 1909 (Oklahoma Agricultural College), Chemistry, Bacteri- 
ology, Soils, German 

Manhattan, Riley county- 
Prank Carl Grutsche, B. S. 1910 (University of Minnesota), Chemistry 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Helen Haines, B. S. 1913 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Education 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Clyde Carney Hamilton, B. S. 1913 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Entomology, German 

Holton, Jackson county 
Richard Harris, B. S. 1912 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Architecture 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Olive Wentworth Hartwell, B. S. 1913 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Education 
Domestic Art 

Wichita, Sedgwick 
Elizabeth Hassebrock, B. S. 1909 (Kansas State Agricultural College), English Language 

Manhattan, Riley county 
William. Hayes, B. S. 1913 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Entomology, Animal 
Husbandry 

Manhattan, Riley county- 
Ida Yiola Hepler, B. S. 1910 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Bacteriology, English 
Language 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Edith Antonette Holmberg, B. S. 1908 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Chemistry, 
Home Economics 

Manhattan, Riley county- 
William Avery Hopper, B. S. 1910 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Education, Mathe- 
matics 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Josiah Simon Hughes, B. S. 1908 (Ohio State University), Chemistry 

Manhattan, Riley county 
John G-rover Jackley, B. S. 1910 (University of Pennsylvania), German 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Ethel Justin, B. S. 1910 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Chemistry, English, German 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Herbert Hiram King, B. S. 1904 (Ewing College), Chemistry 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Lyman Dalton LaTourette, B. S. 1913 (University of Arizona), Pathology, Entomology 

Phoenix, Ariz. 

Vergie McCray, B. S. 1911 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Education 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Preston McNall, B. S. 1909 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Chemistry, Soils 

Manhattan, Riley county 
J. Henry Meyer, A. B. 1913 (Kansas Manual Training Normal School), Chemistry, Soils 

Girard, Crawford county 
Rolla Woods Miller, B. S. 1913 (Wabash College), Chemistry 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Margaret Morris, B. S. 1911 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Music 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Maria Morris, B. S. 1911 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Music 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Ray Murphy, B. S. 1912 (Illinois Wesleyan University), Chemistry 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Porter Joseph Newman, M.S. 1910 (Franklin College), Chemistry. 
Floyd Pattison, B. S. 1912 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Engineering 

Herington, Dickinson county 
Clara Marguerite Peters, B. S. 1911 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Home Economics 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Charles Beryl Pitman, B. S. 1910 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Chemistry, Educa- 
tion, Agronomy 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Essie Blanch Schneider, B. S. 1912 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Home Economics 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Margaret Washburn Schultz, B. S. 1913 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Education, 
Home Economics 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Virginia Sherwood, B. S. 1912 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Education, History 

Manhattan, Riley county 
John Beardsley Sieglinger, B. S. 1913 (.Oklahoma Agricultural College), Chemistry, Soils, 
German 

Lone Wolf, Okla. 

John Clifford Summers, B. S. 1906 (Clemson College, South Carolina), Animal Nutrition, 
Grain Products 

Manhattan, Riley county 



List of Students 319 

Cassie Tanner, B. S. 1912 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Education 
• Manhattan, Riley county 

Chester Francis Turner, B..S. 1912 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Entomology, 
Orcharding 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Marcia Elizabeth Turner, B. S. 1906 (Kansas State Agricultural College), English Lan- 
guage, Home Economics 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Chester Allen Arthur Utt, B. S. 1903 (Cornell College), Chemistry, Bacteriology 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Blanche Beatrice Vanderlip, B. S. 1910 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Education, 
Live iStock 

. Woodston, Rooks county 
Nellie Lunette Wreath, B. S. 1912 (Kansas State Agricultural College), Education 

Manhattan, Riley county 
Katherine Zipse, B. S. 1913 (Kansas State Agricultural College), History, English Lan- 
guage, German, Domestic Art 
Jewell City, Jewell county 



SENIORS 

AGRONOMY 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Wilber Scott Acton, Ames, Gloud 

Aaron E. Anderson, Eskridge, Wabaunsee 

John Otto Barnes, Manhattan, Riley 

Elmer Joseph Bird, Great Bend, Barton 

Harry Clay Bird, Great Bend, Barton 

Byron Ellsworth Blair, Pratt, Pratt 

Frank Scott Blair, Blue Rapids, Marshall 

Freeland Thomas Boise, . Salt Lake City, Utah 

Robert Kline Bonnett, Howard, Elk 

Horace George Chittenden Hays, Ellis 

Alfred Lester Clapp, Fort Scott, Bourbon 

Franklin Arthur Coffman, Lawrence, Douglas 

Allan Park Davidson, Patapsco, Maryland 

Ernest Doryland, Manhattan, Riley 

Frank Leroy Fleming Reading, Lyon 

Victor Horner Florell, Jamestown, Cloud 

Arthur Irving Gilkison, Hutchinson, Reno 

Hiram Stanley Gish, Manhattan, Riley 

William Ingles Gray Jamestown, Cloud 

Waldo Ernest Grimes, Greenwood, Missouri 

Simpson Floyd Hacker, . . . . ' Atwood, Rawlins 

Ralph Sams Hawkins, Marysville, Marshall 

Herbert Lynne Hildwein. Hiawatha, Brown 

Archie Loy Hodgson, . Harveyville, Wabaunsee 

Frank Robert Howe, Wymore, Nebraska 

Robert Earl Karper, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania 

Charles Park Lillard, Bloomington, Illinois 

Milton Carl Lytle, , . . Wellsville, Franklin 

Clayton Alexander Mcintosh, Palmer, Washington 

Homer MeNamara, Manhattan, Riley 

Charles Ernest Millar, Manhattan, Riley 

George Denton Miller, Horton, Brown 

Paul LeRoy Mize, Wilder, Johnson 

Edward May Parrish, Keytesville, Missouri 

Charles Arthur Patterson, Manhattan, Riley 

Aaron Ernest Pearson, Simpson, Mitchell 

Stephen Lee Potter, Marshall, Missouri 

Frank Lee Robinson, Atwood, Rawlins 

Raymond Walter Schafer, Jewell, Jewell 

Herman Henry Sherrard, Winfield, Cowley 

Martin Ivin Shields, Lost Springs, Marion 

Roy Harrison Van Scoik, -. . Aulne, Marion 

Lawrence Paul Wehrle, Scranton, Osage 

Earl Joseph Willis, . 4 Manhattan, Riley 

Yard Thomas Worstell, Bixby, Oklahoma 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Claude Arbuthnot, Cuba, Republic 

Lloyd Neil Arnold, Thomas, Oklahoma 

Milton Henry Borst, Windom, Minnesota 

Gilbert Lynn Cleland, . Alma, Wabaunsee 

Fred Raymond Dunlap, Eureka, Greenwood 



320 Kansas State Agricultural College 

SENIORS — continued. 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Verne Oren Farnsworth, North Topeka, Shawnee 

Ward Stanley G-ates Asherville, Mitchell 

Lloyd Wright Gearhart, Manhattan, Riley 

David Gray, Topeka, Shawnee 

Roy Elmer G-win, Morrowville, Washington 

Walter Andrew Hepler, Manhattan, Riley 

Earl Henry Hostetler, Manhattan, Riley 

Evan Liston Jenkins, White City, Morris 

George DeRue Meiklejohn Jones, Kansas City, Missouri 

Romney Carlyle Ketterman, Norman, Norton 

Archer Franklin Kiser, Manhattan, Riley 

Roy William Kiser, Manhattan, Riley 

Karl Knans, Benedict, Wilson 

Frank Kramer, . . " Zeandale, Riley 

David Frier Laubmann, Russell, Russell 

Carl Oscar Levine, Marysville, Marshall 

L. Evermont McG-innis, Kansas City, Missouri 

William Clifford Meldrum, Cedar Vale, Chautauqua 

Claud F. Neerman, Cummings, Atchison 

Frank Fletcher Root, '. . Iola, Allen 

Herman Frederick Tagge, New Holstein, Wisconsin 

Leon Warden Taylor, Chapman, Dickinson 

Oliver Taylor, Jefferson, Montgomery 

Harry Millard Ziegler, Iola, Allen 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Harry Benjamin Allen, Goff, Nemaha 

William Dennis Brigham, Burlington, Coffey 

Ernest Herbert Clark, Linn, Washington 

William Downs Cusic, Tecumseh, Shawnee 

William G-lenne Davis, Clay Center, Clay 

Arthur Doryland, Manhattan, Riley 

Cameron Schuyler Goldsmith, Abilene, Dickinson 

Cecil Wick Haines, Manhattan, Riley 

Ralph Hershey Musser, Abilene, Dickinson 

©mer Ivo Oshel, Gardner, Johnson 

Roy Malcolm Phillips, Manhattan, Riley 

Harry Charles Stoekwell, Havensville, Pottawatomie 

HORTICULTURE 

Lawrence William Anderson, Lincoln, Lincoln 

William Renwick Curry, Dunavant, Jefferson 

John Fuller Davidson, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Benjamin Ray Ellis, Pleasanton, Linn 

Harold Clare Gaden, Riley, Riley 

Robert Benjamin Hood, Hutchinson, Reno 

Clarence Roy Jaccard, Webb City, Missouri 

James Donald McCallum Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Ernest Grover Shaad, Lawrence, Douglas 

Thomas Garfield Spring, Greensburg, Kiowa 

William Leander Sweet, Manhattan, Riley 

Horace Theodore Wilkie, Topeka, Shawnee 

VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Hans William Broberg, Lincoln, Lincoln 

Jesse Jonathan Frey, Manhattan, Riley 

G-eorge Frederick Haas, Baldwin, Douglas 

Thomas Powell Haslam, Manhattan, Riley 

Lucian Eastman Hobbs, Manhattan, Riley 

Raymond Roger Houser, G-rainfield, Gove 

Leland Allison Howell, North Topeka, Shawnee 

Aldie Philip Immenschuh, Manhattan, Riley 

Ellis Wesley Kern, Kirwin, Phillips 

Edward Kernohan, Nashville, Kingman 

Gnstav Herman Mydland, Manhattan, Riley 

Roscoe Damron Parrish, Johnston City, Illinois 

Deles G-eorge Tepfer, '. . Wichita, Sedgwick 

ARCHITECTURE 

Samuel Hiram Crotinger, Manhattan, Riley 

Earl Philip Friedline, Alden Rice 

Harold Thomas English, Hutchinson, Reno 

Carl Olans Johnson, Clay Center, Clay 

Warren Arthur Rude, Hoisington, Barton 

Floyd Alonzo Smutz Bird City, Cheyenne 

Russell Barr Williamson Princeton, Franklin 



List of Students 321 

SENIORS — continued. 
CIVIL ENGINEERING 
Names Post office (county or state) 

George "Wallace Alexander, Atchison, Atchison 

Arvid Anton Anderson, ......... Lindsborg, McPherson 

Arthur Gilbert Beckman, Lindsborg, McPherson 

Willis Edwin Comfort, Manhattan, Riley 

Arthur Harold Gilles, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

John Gist, Manhattan, Riley 

Melvin Earnest Hartzler Goodland, Sherman 

Victor Guy Hendrickson, Manhattan, Riley 

George Barney Hickok, Wichita, Sedgwick 

John Selwyn McBride Mankato, Jewell 

Ralph Denny Rhodes, Gage, Oklahoma 

Benjamin Scalapino Everest, Brown 

Charles Henry Scholer, Milo, Lincoln 

Ulysses Jay Smith, Manhattan, Riley 

Harold Ainsworth Thackrey, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

George Edwin Werner, Linn, Washington 

Gerald Wyland, Smith Center, Smith 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Harry Everett Butcher, Solomon, Dickinson 

Harold Goble, Riley, Riley 

Lawrence Gaylord Gross, Manhattan, Riley 

Peter John Charles Klaumann, Belleville, Republic 

Lawrence Archibald O'Brien, Luray, Marshall 

Frank Sidorfsky, Leroy, Coffey 

William Ross Smith Peabody, Marion 

Charles Dayton Strain, Phillipsburg, Phillips 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

George Baird, Valencia, Shawnee 

Noble Max Hutchinson, Coalinga, California 

George Selick Knapp, Manhattan, Rijey 

James Francis Moss, Eureka, Greenwood 

Roy Reno Myers, " Manhattan, Riley 

Robert Johnson Taylor, Manhattan, Riley 

Victor Whiteside, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Joseph Roy Witmer, Sabetha, Nemaha 

James Howard Young, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Roy Norton Young . . . Beloit, Mitchell 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Katherine Maurine Adams, Manhattan, Riley 

Lulu Emma LouCena Albers, Nekoma, Rush 

Eva Alleman, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Myra Amsden, Manhattan, Riley 

Elsie Katryn Arbuthnot, Cuba, Republic 

Madeline Baird, Manhattan, Riley 

Lilian Clara Williams Baker, Topeka, Shawnee 

Ethel May Balmer, Hiawatha, Brown 

Margaret Ann Blanchard, Manhattan, Riley 

Esther Hulda Boell, Riley, Riley 

Ethel Marie Boyce, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Mary Kathryn Boyle, Chillicothe, Missouri 

Ethel Louise Brown, Hutchinson, Reno 

Jennie Mabel Brown, Plainsville, Rooks 

Jessie Mabel Brown, Ellsworth, Ellsworth 

Elma Brubaker, Edwardsville, Wyandotte 

Dorothy Jo Buschow, Colby, Thomas 

(Mrs.) Ida Rose Carlson, Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Alice Canfield, Belleville, Republic 

Cecyl DeLois Carter, Lawrence, Douglas 

Francis Mildred Caton, Concordia, Cloud 

Ella Rebecca Chitty, Manhattan, Riley 

Ida Fra Clark, Colony, Anderson 

Mae Clark, Eskridge, Wabaunsee 

Edna Florence Coith, Manhattan, Riley 

Anna Laura Cornick, Topeka, Shawnee 

Elizabeth Anna Cox, Goodrich, Linn 

Grace Lucile Craven, Manhattan, Riley 

Pearl Artena Cross, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Mary Dahl, Montrose, Jewell 

Nora Dahl, Montrose, Jewell 

Edna May Danner, Topeka, Shawnee 

Flossie Edyth Davis, Plevna, Reno 

Josephine Woodward Doran, Topeka, Shawnee 

—11 



322 Kansas State Agricultural College 

SENIORS — continued 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Mary Fay Elliott, Dell Rapids, South Dakota 

(Mrs.) Nellie IPerrin Ely, Coldwater, Comanche 

Mina Erickson, Manhattan, Riley 

Elsie May Ester, ; Peek, Sedgwick 

Helen Mary Evans, Decatur, Indiana 

Edith Elizabeth Folz Marysville, Marshall 

Lena Fossler, Manhattan, Riley 

Olive Ruth Gage, La Cygne, Linn 

Grace Ethel Garvie, Abilene, Dickinson 

Ruth Elizabeth Gilbert, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Edith Sara Glasscock, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Mabel Lucile Glenn, Minneapolis, Ottawa 

Alma Grace Halbower, Anthony, Harper 

Alta Marie Handlin, Manhattan, Riley 

Bessie Lourene Hardman, . . . Commerce, Georgia 

"Vida Agnes Harris, , . . . . Manhattan, Riley 

Rembert Lydia Harshbarger, Manhattan, Riley 

Lola Garnett Hartwell, Frankfort, Marshall 

Nola May Hawthorne, Gypsum, Saline 

Mae Yirgia Hildebrand, Manhattan, Riley 

Helen Marie Hockersmith, Manhattan, Riley 

Bessie Ursula Hoffman, Enterprise, Dickinson 

Mary Hoover, Manhattan, Riley 

Helen Marguerite Hornaday, ........ Lawrence, Douglas 

Nora Melissa Hott, Hiawatha, Brown 

Ethel Margaret Hotte, Manhattan, Riley 

Jeanetta James, . . Joplin, Missouri 

Gladys May Johnson, Manhattan, Riley 

Margaret Florence Jones, Barret, Labette 

Gladys Elsie Kirchner, Burlingame, Osage 

Alice Irene Kiser, Manhattan, Riley 

Vera Belle Kizer, Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Lemon, Plainville, Rooks 

Hazel Viola Limbocker, Manhattan, Riley 

Lillie Edna Lundberg, . . Manhattan, Riley 

Helen Pearl McClanahan, .- Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Emma McCluskey, Junction City, Geary 

(Mrs.) Maude Eveline McColloch, Manhattan, Riley 

Elvira Miriam McKee, Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Elizabeth McNamara, ........ Manhattan, Riley 

Sophia Elizabeth Maelzer, Centralia, Nemaha 

Anna Malm, Manhattan, Riley 

Maud Marshall, Manhattan, Riley 

Golda E stella Masters, Manhattan, Riley 

Edith Maude Maxwell, Topeka, Shawnee 

Gertrude Helen Miller, .......... Manhattan, Riley 

Emily June Miiner, Hartford, Lyon 

Flora Seraphine Monroe, Ottawa, Franklin 

Margaret Ellenor Moore, Manhattan, Riley 

Jessie Elizabeth Neiman, White Water, Butler 

Mary Eleanor Neiman, , . , White Water, Butler 

Prudence Eileen Neiswender, ....... North Topeka, Shawnee 

Winifred Louise Neusbaum, ........ Manhattan, Riley 

Ethel Blanch Niver, Inman, McPherson 

Mary Nixon, . . . Manhattan, Riley 

Ida May Northrop, San Gabriel, California 

Genevieve Alice Nowlin, Kansas City, Missouri 

Martha Lois Noyes, Manhattan, Riley 

Nellie May Olson, Harveyville, Wabaunsee 

Lois Fae Paddock, Manhattan, Riley 

Izil Isabella Poison, Fredonia, Wilson 

Mabel Grace Powell, Manhattan, Riley 

Anna Lottie Pratt, Burlingame, Osage 

Ethelyn Pearl Pray, Manhattan, Riley 

Maggie Price, . Manhattan, Riley 

Alta Coy Roberts, Morill, Brown 

Ethel Bruce Roseberry, Arkansas City, Cowley 

Mary Susan Rowan, Arkansas City, Cowley 

Verna May Rumble, Moran, Allen 

Clara Louise Sachau, Manhattan, Riley 

Anna Elizabeth Sanders, Manhattan, Riley 

Amy Inez Savage, Miltonvale, Cloud 

Eda Lillian Schowalter, Halstead, Harvey 

Bertha Ruegg Schwab, Clifton, Washington 

Eva Leona Sharpe, Chase, Rice 

Bessie Laura Sheaff, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Hazel Shellenberger, Westboro, Missouri 

Anna Maude Smith, Lyons, Rice 

Twyliah Opal Springer,' Tulsa, Oklahoma 



List of Students 323 

SENIORS — continued 
Names Post offi.ce {county or state) 

Anna Steckelberg, Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Kathryn Sterrenberg, Manhattan, Riley 

Lola Dow Stoddard Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Dow Stoddard, Manhattan, Riley 

May Leigh Symonds, Peabody, Marion 

Murrel Myra Sweet, Manhattan, Riley 

Gail Tatman, Manhattan, Riley 

Cora Tempero, Clay Center, Clay 

Emma Atwood Tomlinson, Topeka, Shawnee 

Bernice Truesdell, Lyons, Rice 

Bertha Truesdell, Lyons, Rice 

Verna May Vanderlip, Woodston, Rooks 

Margaret Esther Walbri-' Russell, Russell 

Bessie Blanche Walsh, Clay Center, Clay 

Nellie Merle Wartenbee Liberal, Seward 

Lillian Caroline Weekf "Vermilion, Marshall 

Amelia Ursula Wheele Manhattan, Riley 

Margaret Lee Whiter,, Topeka, Shawnee 

Gladys Wilcox, Dwight, Morris 

Beulah Wingfield, Dwight, Morris, 

Laura Wingfield, . . • Dwight, Morris 

Ada Worley Paradise, Russell 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

Jesse Bliss Adams, Mound City, Linn 

John William Allen, Norwich, Kingman 

John Gordon Auld, Manhattan, Riley 

Harry Charles B air d, Kensington, Smith 

Julia Margaret Baker, Cherryvale, Montgomery 

Albert William Bellomy, Manhattan, Riley 

Charles Fay Buck, Oskaloosa, Jefferson 

Lois Blanche Burt, Wabaunsee, Wabaunsee 

Carl Balfour Butler, Manhattan, Riley 

Leslie Irl Collins, Manhattan, Riley 

Clara Affadilla Dearer, Sebetha, Nemaha 

Henry Owen Dresser, Manhattan, Riley 

Mina Louisa Dyer Riley, Riley 

Thomas Joseph Harris, Howard, Elk 

Ruth Isabel Hughes, Topeka, Shawnee 

John Luther Hutchinson, Lincoln, Lincoln 

James Walter Johansen, Hays, Ellis, 

Frederick Herbert Loomis, Alton, Osborne 

John Lund, Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Belle Lunden, Salina, Saline 

John Michael Lyons, Manhattan, Riley 

Ethel Marshall, Manhattan, Riley 

William Joseph Marshall, Manhattan, Riley 

Alexander Bradford Morgan, Leon, Butler 

Junior Bowler Mudge, Manhattan, Riley 

Kathrina Munger, ■ Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Nichols, Nortonville, Jefferson 

Minne Beryl Pence, Dunavant, Jefferson 

George Hemrod Railsback, Manhattan, Riley 

Nellie Evelyn Reed, Havensville, Pottawatomie 

John Lee Robinson, Hays, Ellis 

Martin William Souders, Manhattan, Riley 

Joe Vale, Webber, Jewell 

Hannah Amelia Wetzig, Manhattan, Riley 

Clyde George Winter, Dover, Shawnee 

INDUSTRIAL JOURNALISM 

Lucile Rebecca Berry, Jewell, Jewell 

Vinton Virgil Detwiler, Jewell, Jewell 

Dwight Logan Miller, Manhattan, Riley 

William Allison Sumner, Manhattan, Riley 



324 Kansas State Agricultural College 

JUNIORS 

AGRONOMY 

Names Post office (county or state) 

John Joseph Bayles, Manhattan, Riley 

Fred Miles Bealey, Morrill, Brown 

Samuel Lynton Brookover, Eureka, Greenwood 

Percy Walter Cockerill, Manhattan, Riley 

William Bayles Coffman, Manhattan, Riley 

Ralph Cleland Erskine, Edgerton, Johnson 

Luzerne Fairchild, Manhattan, Riley 

Robert Everett Preeto, Cheney, Sedgwick 

Charles William Gar tr ell Kansas City, Missouri 

Roy Hagans, Utica, Ness 

Prank Haucke, Council Grove, Morris 

Herbert Henley Haymaker, Wichita, Sedgwick 

John Vern Hepler, Manhattan, Riley 

John Hungerford Manhattan, Riley 

Bon Louis Irwin, Winfield, Cowley 

James Lawrence Jacobson, WatervUle, Marshall 

Floyd William Johnson, Downs, Osborne 

Amwel Edwin Jones, Manhattan, Riley 

Foo Kau Lee, Honolulu, H. I. 

Marc Lindsay, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Charles Gardiner Lyon, Emporia, Lyon 

James Marshall McArthur, Walton, Harvey 

Guy Everett McCarthy, Manhattan, Riley 

Arthur Erskine McClymonds, Walton, Harvey 

James Myron McCray, Manhattan, Riley 

Chester Howard Middleton, Manhattan, Riley 

Fred Weymouth Milner, Hartford, Lyon 

Raymond Jack Montgomery, Topeka, Shawnee 

Lawrence Maston Nabours, Manhattan, Riley 

Edward Quinsby Perry, Manhattan, Riley 

Joseph Heber Pierce, Fredonia, Wilson 

Percival Button Potter, Manhattan, Riley 

Edward Russell, McPherson, McPherson 

Wilbur Neilsen Skourup, Colony, Anderson 

William Burton Smith, Wellsville, Franklin 

John William Stockebrand, Vernon, Woodson 

Elbert Edward Thompson, Horton, Brown 

Julius Patterson "Van Yleit, Manhattan, Riley 

George Isidore Walsh, Manhattan, Riley 

John Hanna Welsh, Kansas City, Missouri 

George Washington Williams, Bigelow, Marshall 

William Wayne Willis, Emporia, Lyon 

John Barton Wise, Clearwater, Sedgwick 

Willits Reeve Worthington Manhattan, Riley 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Glenn Allen, Lawrence, Douglas 

George Edgar Anderson Manhattan, Riley 

George Harold Ansdell Jamestown, Cloud 

Keatley Graham Baker, Manhattan, Riley 

GeoTge Herbert Bunnel, Iola, Allen 

Arthur Burkholder, Marion, Marion 

Henry Samuel Collins, Manhattan, Riley 

Harold Clay Ewers, Topeka, Shawnee 

Joe Myron Goodwin, Asherville, Mitchell 

Merrill Lenord Gould Jamestown, Cloud 

Oscar LeRoy Johnson, Mead, Nebraska 

Lafayette Poindexter Jones, Carlsbad, New Mexico 

Ernest Lawson, Mankato, Jewell 

Fred Morris Layton, Blue Rapids, Marshall 

Paul Loomis, Manhattan, Riley 

Harry Strawn Loyd, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Jay Lawrence Lush, Altamont, Labette 

Clinton Fish Mcllrath, Kingman, Kingman 

Wallace Mcllrath, Manhattan, Riley 

Lorenzo Beckley Mann, Manhattan, Riley 

William O'Connell, Kiowa, Barber 

Raymond Smith Orr, Manhattan, Riley 

Will Edward Palmer Hays, Ellis 

Wray Robert Reeves, Manhattan, Riley 

Richard Jerome Sedivy, Blue Rapids, Marshall 

Bryon John Taylor, Chapman, Dickinson 

Fred Martin Taylor, Formoso, Jewell 

Ralph Waldo Taylor Sedgwick, Harvey 

Walter Edward Tudor, Holton, Jackson 

Wilmer Homer Wilson, Osage City, Osage 



List of Students 325 

JUNIORS — continued. 
DAIRY HUSBANDRY 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Albert William Aicher, Manhattan, Riley 

Otto Lincoln Hubp, Mexico City, Mexico 

James Walton Linn, Manhattan, Riley 

William Symington Morrow, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Victor Fred Stuewe, Alma, Wabaunsee 

G-raydon Tilbury, Arkansas City, Cowley 

Francis Marion Wadley, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Harry Homer Wilson, Silver Lake, Shawnee 

HORTICULTURE 

Fred Collins Browne, Burdett, Pawnee 

Anson Lane Ford, Manhattan, Riley 

Louie Loraine Horr, Lawrence, Douglas 

Glenn Henderson Lawyer, Iola, Allen 

James Ralph Little, Topeka, Shawnee 

Archie Lee Marble Esbon, Jewell 

David Riley Shull, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

William Taylor, Mexico City, Mexico 

Walter Harris Washington, Manhattan, Riley 

VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Merrill Ellsworth Agnew, Smith Center, Smith 

William Albert Bright, Plainville, Rooks 

Lawrence Vernon Cummings Wichita, Sedgwick, 

George Holland Dean, ...» Arkansas City, Cowley 

Ira Loren Fowler, Manhattan, Riley 

William Arthur Hagan, Manhattan, Riley 

Paul King, Potwin, Butler 

William Clarence McConnell, Downs, Osborne 

Zara Harmon McDonnall Goff, Nemaha 

John William Meyer, Chapman, Dickinson 

William James Scanlan, Chapman, Dickinson 

Cameron Mac Smith, Wakefield, Clay 

Tom Toothaker, Manhattan, Riley 

Richard Thomas Wilson, Manhattan, Riley 

ARCHITECTURE 

Stanley Baker, Manhattan, Riley 

George Wilson Christie, Manhattan, Riley 

Lester Lawrence Howenstine, Manhattan, Riley 

Harold Lester Hurtt Wichita, Sedgwick 

Robert Edwin Sellers Emporia, Lyon 

Charles William Shaver Lincoln, Lincoln 

Elmer Warren Wilson Kansas City, Wyandotte 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Frank Harmon Freeto, Cheney, Sedgwick 

George Arthur Hopp, Manhattan, Riley 

Ralph Jones, Cottonwood Falls, Chase 

Wayne Ramage, Arkansas City, Cowley 

Guy Allegre Russell, Lakin, Kearny 

Francis Lewelling Shull, Manhattan, Riley 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Charles Andros Barrows, Atchison, Atehison 

James Edgar Alsop, Wakefield, Clay 

Chancellor Lee Archer, Glasco, Cloud 

Ralph Gahan Baker, Malta Bend, Missouri 

Henry Brown, Mont Ida, Anderson 

Nelson Harry Davis, Delavan, Morris 

George Louis Farmer Wichita, Sedgwick 

Shelby Glasgow Fell, Haviland, Kiowa 

Lawrence Vale Fickel, Manhattan, Riley 

Gerald Laurence Fitzgerald, Colby, Thomas 

Louis Charles Geisendorf, Clearwater, Sedgwick 

Maynard Goudy, Waverly, Coffey 

Calvin Andrew Hooker, Tyro, Montgomery 

Paul Edward Jackson, Downs, Osborne 

Foo Yueu Lim, Canton, China 

Willard Jackson Loomis, Colby, Thomas 

Frank Archer Moore, Tribune, Greeley 

Homer Earl Newhouse, Lane, Franklin 

Arthur Nichols, Manhattan, Riley 

Milo Albert Nicholson, Spring Hill, Jefferson 



326 Kansas State Agricultural College 

JUNIORS — continued. 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Lewis Reynolds Parkerson Manhattan, Riley 

Lloyd Reudy, Dodge City, Ford 

Paul Cotter Ringwalt, Oakley, Logan 

Gilbert Haven Sechrist, - . . . . Meriden, Jefferson 

Cofwin Crittenden Smith, Manhattan, Riley 

Eugene Shapley Smith, Pittsburg, Crawford 

John Thompson Steele, jr., Manhattan, Riley 

John Walter Stockebrand, Yernon, Woodson 

Leland Ray Yarcoe, Wilsey, Morris 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Joel Emanuel Bengston, Lindsborg, McPherson 

Chester Arthur Carter, . Garden City*, Finney 

Bruce Henry Cummings, Richland, Shawnee 

Arthur Douglas, Manhattan, Riley 

Nicholas Fritz Enns, Inman, McPherson 

Albert Hilery Ganshird, Manhattan, Riley 

Charles Wallace Giffin, Paola, Miami 

William Witt Haggard, Topeka, Shawnee 

George Hamilton, Manhattan, Riley 

George Mawhirter, Wakarusa, Shawnee 

John Irl Michaels, Osawatomie, Miami 

John Dwight Parsons, Arkansas City, Cowley 

William Leon Rhoades, Pleasanton, Linn 

Ralph Allen Shelly, Atchison, Atchison 

Francis Eugene Sullivan, Greeley, Anderson 

Roy Leander Swenson, •. Lindsborg, McPherson 

Frank Vincent, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Harold Adlia Wagner, Manhattan, Riley 

Corl Walter Wyland, Harlan, Smith 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Ruth Harriet Aiman, Manhattan, Riley 

Maurine Dorothy Allison, McPherson, McPherson 

Ruth Arbuthnot, Belleville, Republic 

Dulce Atkins, Manhattan, Riley 

Agnes Lenora Baird Kansas City, Missouri 

Elsie Loretta Baird, Cherry vale, Montgomery 

Bertha Fern Baker, Narka, Republic 

Florence Annie Baker , Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Edna Frances Barber, Manhattan, Riley 

Grace Adeline Barker, Newton, Harvey 

Lillian Elsie Barnum, Simpson, Cloud 

Cleo LuGile Beall, San Marcos, Texas 

Edith Nell Beaubien Dodge City, Ford 

Mabel Bennett, Manhattan, Riley 

Clara Louise Blair, Mulvane, Sumner 

Dorothy Blazer, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Ruby Edna Blomquist, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Myrtle Pearl Blythe, White City, Morris 

Marie Anita Boyle Spivey, Kingman 

Ena Bess Brown, Manhattan, Riley 

Minnie Ruth Brown, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

D'Elsie Bryan, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Elsie Luella Bueheim Winkler, Riley 

Eliza Burkdoll, Ottawa, Franklin 

Effie May Carp, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Ethel Esther Gary, Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Rosena Churchward, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Pauline Frances Clarke, Paola, Miami 

Minerva Clare Cooper, Pendennis, Lane 

Mary Margaret Courter, Topeka, Shawnee 

Yerral Janice Craven, . Erie, Neosho 

Juanita Davis, Cottonwood Falls, Chase 

Myrtle DeFever, Fall River, Greenwood 

Elizabeth Dempewolf, Frankfort, Marshall 

Mary Virginia Dodd, Langdon, Reno 

Yaleda Edith Downing, Stafford, Stafford 

Mary Rebecca Dunlap, Eureka, Greenwood 

Marguerite Elliott, Manhattan, Riley 

Emma Evalirce Evans, Liberal, Seward 

Laura Belle Falkenrich, Manhattan, Riley 

Louise Fielding, Manhattan, Riley 

Elizabeth Fitzgerald, . . . Roswell, New Mexico 

Marion Rosina Fowler, Brookville, Saline 

Erma Lea Fox, Lamed, Pawnee 

Yelora Augusta Fry, Manhattan, Riley 

Carrie Belle Gardner, Newton, Harvey 



List of Students 327 

JUNIORS — continued. 
Names p os t office (county or state) 

Mary Ellen Glenn, Waverly, Coffey 

Amy Pearl Gould Manhattan, Riley 

Louise Greenman Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Edythe Seanert Groome Manhattan, Riley 

Minuie Agnes Gugenhan, May Day Riley 

Mary Gurnea, : Belleville, Republic, 

Daisy Arminta Hall, Speed, Phillips 

Drusilla Edith Halleek, Abilene, Dickinson 

Esther Jaae Hamerli, Oak Hill, Clay 

Carru Miller Harper, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Elsie Cathrme Hellwig, Oswego, Labette 

Vivian Herron, Topeka, Shawnee 

Ruth Lucile Hill, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Mildred Hollings worth, Lincoln, Lincoln 

Louise Jacobs, Council Grove, Morris 

Grace Florence Kasermann, Topeka, Shawnee 

Crystal Helene Kelley, Yates Center, Woodson 

Mabel Beatrice Kessler, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Mary Jo Kimball, Manhattan, Riley 

Grace May King, Burlington, Coffey 

Ida Jane Kingan, . Topeka, Shawnee 

(Mrs.) Flora Einsel Kirk Manhattan, Riley " 

Katharine Mermet Laing, Manhattan, Riley 

Lillian Antoinette Lathrop, Manhattan, Riley 

Nelle Florence Longenecker, , Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Grace Isabel Luthye, Topeka, Shawnee 

Esther Grace Lyon, Manhattan, Riley 

Grace Kerns McCoppin, Phillipsburg, Phillips 

Pearle Irene McHenry, Paola, Miami 

Mary Inez Mann, • . Wichita, Sedgwick 

Sadie Mindie Marvin Emporia, Lyon 

Alice Montgomery Wilsey, Morris 

Corinne Myers; Marion, Ohio 

Esther Serida Nelson, Manhattan, Riley 

Ethel Elverna Newkirk, Geneseo, Rice 

Ruth Sabina Nygren, Topeka, Shawnee 

Gertrude Emeline Palmer, ........ Hays, Ellis 

Pauline Parkhurst, Kinsley, Edwards 

(Mrs.) Eleanor Beverly Patrick, Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Esther Peak, Pratt, Pratt 

Eva May Pease, Manhattan, Riley 

Ruby May Peck, Garnett, Anderson 

Florence Nell Peppiatt, Ellsworth, Ellsworth 

Grace Mav Pershing, Ogallah, Trego 

Thurza Elizabeth Pitman, Manhattan, Riley 

Evelyn Marie Potter, Barnes, Washington 

Eula Bess Pyle, Lawrence, Douglas 

Sara Bunitta Richardson, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Clara Louise Robbins, Colony, Anderson , 

Georgia Emma Roberts, Morrill, Brown 

Helen Dena Robinson, . Holton, Jackson 

Madge Rowell Strasburg, Missouri 

Dorothy Schloh, Natoma, Osborne 

Anna Winifred Searl, Morland, Graham 

Meta Viola Sheaff, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Jennie Ellen Shoup ITdall, Cowley 

Katharine O'Donnell Smith, ......... Stockton, Rooks 

Helen Mav Stewart, Spearville, Ford 

Lois Katharine Stewart, Spearville, Ford 

Edna Isabel St. John, Wamego, Pottawatomie 

Marie Story, Manhattan, Riley 

Helena Amelia Stromquist, Lindsborg, McPherson 

Frieda Matilda Stuewe, Alma, Wabaunsee , 

Blanche Lovina Tanner, Manhattan, Riley 

Anna Elizabeth Thomas, Kansas City, Missouri 

Gertrude Tillotson, Manhattan, Riley 

Mildred Tolles, Lawrence, Douglas 

Alberlina Tulloss, Ottawa, Franklin 

Aleatha Mae Tyner, Overbrook, Osage 

Nellie Maude Vedder, Franklin, Nebraska 

Louise Chester Walbridge, Russell, Russell 

Clara Willis, Horton, Brown, 

Berenice Elena Wilson, Concordia, Cloud 

Jessie Belle Woodworth Tecumseh, Shawnee 

Gertrude Wunder, "Valley Falls, Jefferson 

Esther Louise Zeininger, Wichita, Sedgwick 



328 Kansas State Agricultural College 

JUNIORS — continued. 
GENERAL SCIENCE 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Ernest Baird, Minneapolis, Ottawa 

Frank Bergier, (3-lasco, Cloud 

Verne Brothers, Agra, Phillips 

Vernon Everett Bundy Randolph, , Riley 

Herbert Spencer Coith, Manhattan, Riley 

James Denison Colt, Manhattan, Riley 

G-ranville Dorman, Paola, Miami 

Edna Gulick, Winfield, Cowley 

Robert John Hanna, Mankato, Jewell 

Okarles Axtell Hunter, Blue Rapids, Marshall 

Mary Alberta Johnson, El Dorado, Butler 

Eva Marguerite Kell, Manhattan, Riley 

May Belle Landis, Kiowa, Barber 

Phoebe Jane Lund, Manhattan, Riley 

Harry Virgil Matthew, Manhattan, Riley 

Bele Miller, Sabetha, Nemaha 

Charlotte Morton Ellsworth, Ellsworth 

Edgar Leon Noel, Glasco, Cloud 

CHara Anna Peairs, Topeka, Shawnee 

Josephine Price Perrill, Manhattan, Riley 

-Lurd Astor Richards, Manhattan, Riley 

Harold Edward Rose, Manhattan, Riley 

Prank Sargent, Holton, Jackson 

Hattie Christina Schaumburg, La Crosse, Rush 

Erie Hazlett Smith, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Orliff Elmer Smith, Manhattan, Riley 

Walter Francis Smith, Mankato, Jewell 

Fred Stevenson, Salina, Saline 

Viela Maude Sweet, Mankato, Jewell 

Ina Belle Wilson, * . . Wichita, Sedgwick 

Kathryn Jane Wilson, Valley Falls, Jefferson 

Hachiro Yuasa, Manhattan, Riley 

INDUSTRIAL JOURNALISM 

Harry Coxen Eskridge, Wabaunsee 

John Randolph Hall, jr., Marshall, Missouri 

Eva Hostetler, Manhattan, Riley 

Dorian Paul Kicord, Esbon, Jewell 

SOPHOMORES 

AGRONOMY 

Le Roy Alt, Norborne, Missouri 

Alfred Carroll Aptiz, Manhattan, Riley 

George Murray Arnold, Piedmont, Greenwood 

William James Baker Malta Bend, Missouri 

Lester Ford Barnes, Fontana, Miami 

Lester Jay Bell Wellsville, Franklin 

John Billings, Grantville, Jefferson 

William Ray Bolen, . Le Roy, Coffey 

Daniel Madison Bursch, Buffalo, Wilson 

George Rigg Campbell, Fulton, Bourbon 

Ira Chapman, Manhattan, Riley 

Kim Ak Ching, : Honolulu, Hawaii 

Anton Christian Christophersen, Garrison, Pottawatomie 

James William Crumbaker, Onaga, Pottawatomie 

William Deitz, Overland, Johnson 

Robert Oren Deming, jr., Oswego, Labette 

George Ernest Denman, Manhattan, Riley 

Daniel Everett Donovan Peru, Nebraska 

George Engsbrand, Leonardville, Riley 

Carl Eustace Fitzgerald, Dodge City, Ford 

Irl Ferris Fleming, Manhattan, Riley 

Claude Fletcher Hiawatha, Brown 

Lawrence Garlough, Cedarville, Ohio 

Nathan Gish, Manhattan, Riley 

Paul Bernard Gwin, Morrowville, Washington 

Charles Franklin Holladay, Spearville, Ford 

Walter Perry Hutchinson, Goddard, Sedgwick 

Elmer Herman Jantz, Larned, Pawnee 

Nicholas Tickon Jerebzoff, Manhattan, Riley 

Donald Smith Jordan, Topeka, Shawnee 

Charles Vincent Kershaw, Garrison, Pottawatomie 

John Kiene, Valencia, Shawnee 

Walter Scott Lay, Buffalo, Wilson 



List of Students 329 



SOPHOMOBES — continued. 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Howard Allyn Lindsley, Manhattan, Riley 

Reuben Edward Lofinck, Manhattan, Riley 

Claude Ewing Lovett, Eureka, Greenwood 

Willard Earl Lyness, Walnut, Crawford 

James Hendrix McAdams, . Salina, Saline 

Paul Campbell McGilliard, Manhattan, Riley 

Albert John Mangelsdorf, Atchison, Atchison 

Edwin Isaac Maris, Nortoaville, Jefferson 

James Robert Mason, Seneca, Nemaha 

Thomas Edwin Moore, Manhattan, Riley 

Ralph Vernon O'Neil Wellsville, Franklin 

John Thomas Pearson Parsons, Labette 

Joseph Vincent Quigley, Blaine, Pottawatomie 

Earl Ramsey, Solomon, Dickinson 

Archie Monroe Richards Manhattan, Riley 

Daniel Andrew Robbins Colony, Anderson 

Paul Robinson, Oswego, Labette 

Rudolph George Rodewald, Yates Center, Woodson 

James Walter Rolf, Pratt, Pratt 

Glenn Charles Salisbury, Hays, Ellis 

George McClellan Schick, jr., Plainview, Texas 

Elmer Houser Schultz, Manhattan, Riley 

Irwin Charles Scott, ' . . Agra, Phillips 

Edward Loy You Shim, Kahului, T. H. 

Guy Cephus Smith, Great Bend, Barton 

Glenn Bryan Snapp Belleville, Republic 

Ralph Robinold St. John, Wamego, Pottawatomie 

Harlan Randolph Sumner, Manhattan, Riley 

Lewis Marten tlmberger, Hymer, Chase 

Archie Glenn Van Horn, ......... Overbrook, Osage 

Fred Wenn, Erie, Neosho 

Price Harlan Wheeler, Garden City, Finney 

Wilton Terry White, Jewell, Jewell 

Raymond Hazzleton Whitenack, Manhattan, Riley 

Martin William Wilson, Lincoln, Lincoln 

Loftin Verdery Witeher Fort Worth, Texas 

Samuel Charles Yingling, El Dorado, Butler 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Walter Brown Adair, Osawatomie, Miami 

Raymond Voiles Adams, Eureka, Greenwood 

Bernard Martin Anderson, Manhattan, Riley 

Glen Harry Anderson, Lincoln, Lincoln 

James Malcolm Aye, Manhattan, Riley 

Hugh Edwin Baird, Formoso, Jewell 

Henry Bengman Bayer, Toronto, Woodson 

Orie Walter Beeler, Mankato, Jewell 

Ary Clay Berry, Topeka, Shawnee 

William Harrison Brookover Eureka, Greenwood 

Omar Olin Browning, Linwood, Leavenworth 

Arthur Baptiste Bursh, Newton, Harvey 

Orville Burtis, Fredonia, Wilson 

William Ronald Cotton Wamego, Pottawatomie 

Lewie Elven Crandall Le Roy, Coffey 

Fred Cromer, Manhattan, Riley 

Robert Elliott Curtis, Manhattan, Riley 

Hugh Byron Dudley, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Frank Arthur Elliott, Yates Center, Woodson 

Hilder Forsberg, Manhattan, Riley 

Clarence Fickel, Manhattan, Riley 

Herbert Horace Frizzell, Cherokee, Oklahoma 

Shirley Richard Gardenhire Alma, Wabaunsee 

Charles Glenn Hale, jr., Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Preston Hale, Manhattan, Riley 

Harry Harlan, Smith Center, Smith 

Frank Burton Hodgden, Manhattan, Riley 

Louis Samuel Hodgson, Harveyville, Wabaunsee 

John Herbert Howell, Waverly, Coffey 

Frederick Anthony Kays, Eureka, Greenwood 

Robert Ray Lancaster, ~ . . . . Manhattan, Riley 

Carl Richard Lawson, Mankato, Jewell 

Thomas Robert Logan, Manhattan, Riley 

Gerald Scott McNamara, Manhattan, Riley 

Clair Foster Markley, Manhattan, Riley 

Eugene Roy Martin, Eureka, Greenwood 

Lewis Augustine Maury, San Antonio, Texas 

John Arthur Meyer, Anthony, Harper 

George Herbert Mulford, Topeka, Shawnee 

Earl O'Connell, Kiowa, Barber 



330 Kansas State Agricultural College 

S OPHOMORE S — continued. 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Walter John Ott, . . . Greenleaf, Washington 

Ralph Paul Ramsey, Solomon, Dickinson 

James Leroy Robinson, Nashville, Kingman 

William Herbert Robinson Holton, Jackson 

Earl Franklin Shaw, Phillipsburg, Phillips 

Emmett Warren Skinner, Manhattan, Riley 

Charles Lorn Slentz, Great Bend, Barton 

William Whitney Smith, Westphalia, Anderson 

William Algeron Sutton, Carthage, Missouri 

Roy Nelson Walker, Atchison, Atchison 

Wayne Lycurgus Willhoite, Manhattan, Riley 

Clarence Burton Williams, .' . Bigelow, Marshall 

Lewis Arthur Williams, Sylvan Grove, Lincoln 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Earl Edward Davis, : Manhattan, Riley 

Leon Aldrich Ek, McPherson, McPherson 

Rudolph Emil Stuewe, Alma, Wabaunsee 

Hubbard Oscar Stockwell, . . Larned, Pawnee 

HORTICULTURE 

Morgan Thompson Binney, Kansas City, Missouri 

William Cecil Calvert, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Edwin William Paulconer Clay Center, Clay 

Harry Alexander Gunning, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Robert Hezekiah Kidd, Dayton, Ohio 

Everett Raymond McGalliard, Troy, Doniphan 

Lowell Marston Mason, Belle Plaine, Sumner 

Grosevenor Ward Putnam, Larned, Pawnee 

Walter Roy Quinn, Bennington, Ottawa 

James Curtis Riney, Pratt, Pratt 

James Homer Sharpe, Council Grove, Morris 

Elbert Lewis Smith, Soldier, Jackson 

Prank Andrew Unruh, Haddam, Washington 

Sidney Rendall Vandenberg, Kansas City, Missouri 

Edmund Francis Wilson, Kansas City, Missouri 

VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Richard Clay Chatman, Manhattan, Riley 

John" Bevenard Collister, Manhattan, Riley 

Earl Morris Dobbs, Manhattan, Riley 

Cecil Elder, Argonia, Sumner 

Gerald Woodward Fitzgerald, Roswell, New Mexico 

Asa Forest Flanagan, Chapman, Dickinson 

Fred Hartwig, Goodland, Sherman 

Eddell Charles Jones, Emporia, Lyon 

Samuel Robert McArthur, Walton, Harvey 

Curt Muller, Manhattan, Riley 

Charles Ernest O'Neal, Wiggins, Mississippi 

Eugene Frank Pile, Arkalon, Seward 

George Thomas Reaugh, Burns, Marion 

Glenn Armiel Riley, Manhattan, Riley 

ARCHITECTURE 

William Herbert Broddle, Herington, Dickinson 

Alvin Theodore Coith, Manhattan, Riley 

Fred Evans, Wichita, Sedgwick 

George Campbell Ferrier, Osborne, Osborne 

Thomas ■ Lewis Holley, jr., Manhattan, Riley 

Henry Robert Horak, Munden, Republic 

Charles Henry Kellogg, Manhattan, Riley 

Fred Albert Korsmier, Manhattan, Riley 

Leo Leslie Smith, Hoisington, Barton 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

George Sheares Douglas, Beattie, Marshall 

Andrew Earl Dyatt, Almena, Norton 

Forrest Everette Gilmore, Manhattan, Riley 

Edgar Goldsmith Cheney, Sedgwick 

OUey Harold Hamm, Arkansas City, Cowley 

George Noel Herron, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Irwin Joseph Jacques, Manhattan, Riley 

Elmer Johnson, Cheney, Sedgwick 

Harry Ralph Johnston, Manhattan, Riley 

Lawrence Antoine Leonard, Wamego, Pottawatomie 

Merrifield Martling, Wichita, Sedgwick 



List of Students 331 



SOPHOMORES — continued. 
Names Post office {county or state) 

Leo Alexander Mingenback, McPherson, McPherson 

Eobert Francis Mirick, Otis, Rush 

William "Warren Rutter, Topeka, Shawnee 

Paul Crowder Scheer, Topeka, Shawnee 

Edward John Suydam, Leavenworth, Leavenworth 

Loipaid Carl Teeter, Wamego, Pottawatomie 

Ralph Pierce Van Zile, Manhattan, Riley 

Ahoon Wong, Honolulu, T. H. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Benjamin MeKinley Andrews, Norcatur, Decatur 

George Carrol Bailey, Bucklin, Ford 

Elisha Boothe , Manhattan, Riley 

Antis Monteville Butcher, Solomon, Dickinson 

George Andrew Cunningham, Cheney, Sedgwiek 

Walter Emil Deal, Great Bend, Barton 

Fabian Caleb Dickinson, Topeka, Shawnee 

Robert Albert Graves, Abilene, Dickinson 

James Sidney Hagan, Manhattan, Riley 

Charlie Thomas Halbert, Agra Phillips 

Paul Russell Helt, Winfield, Cowley 

Andrew Herold, . . , Seneca, Nemaha 

William Kennedy Hervey, . . . Centralia, Nemaha 

Arthur Edward Hopkins, Tonganoxie, Leavenworth 

Arlie Noel Johnson Neosho Falls, Woodson 

Talbot Roy Knowies, Manhattan, Riley 

James Dallas Laughlin, Manhattan, Riley 

Paul Revier Lcuiiy, Ramona, Marion 

Robert Brucfc Leydig, El Dorado, Butler 

Henry Dale Lincott, Milford, Geary 

Arthur Wilford McCarter, Topeka, Shawnee 

William Charles McGraw, Manhattan, Riley 

Otto Irl Markham, Manhattan, Riley 

Jay Meara, A'xtell, Marshall 

John William Musil, Blue Rapids, Marshall 

Fred Hemmant Nash Farmington, Arkansas 

Robert Earl Nixon, Prairie View, Phillips 

Earl Rathbun Phares, Parsons, Labette 

Joseph Glenn Phinney, Manhattan, Riley 

Earl Verne Plush, Penalosa, Kingman 

John Prosser Rathbun, Downs, Osborne 

Paul Charles Rawson Wamego, Pottawatomie 

Benjamin Burgess Richards, Delphos, Ottawa 

John Paul Slade Clay Center, Clay 

Alta Roy Tanner, . . '. Iola, Allen 

Dodderidge Calvin Tate, Manhattan, Riley 

Wood Tebbe, Great Bend, Barton 

Harry Tyrell, Topeka, Shawnee 

George Lin Usselman, Coldwater, Comanche 

Thomas Kenneth Vincent, Kansas City, Missouri 

Horace Alfred Williams, Sylvan Grove, Lincoln 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Joseph Jesse Abernethy, " Gonzales, Texas 

Albert Cecil Arnold, Manhattan, Riley 

Samuel Edwin Barnes, Blue Mound, Linn 

Fenton France Borst, Windom, Minnesota 

Lawrence Irwin Champe Greeley, Anderson 

Charles Elbert Curtis, Manhattan, Riley 

Walter Freeburg, Lindsborg, McPherson 

Homer Arthur Herrick, Manhattan, Riley 

Ralph Holland, Pleasanton, Linn 

Horace Everett Pateman, Leavenworth, Leavenworth 

Frank Richard Rawson, Wamego, Pottawatomie 

Lyman Jay Rees, Talmage, Dickinson 

Charles Sappin, Manhattan, Riley 

George William Schneider, Logan, Phillips 

Foster Leonard Shelley, Elmdale, Chase 

Walter Alvin Simpson, Manhattan, Riley 

Diamond Richard Smith, Lawrence, Douglas 

Roscoe Noyes St. John Wamego, Pottawatomie 

Vester Wells, Anthony, Harper 

Leslie Adam Wilsey, Chapman, Dickinson 

Charles Herman Zimmerman, Stillwell, Johnson 



332 Kansas State Agricultural College 

SOPHOMORE S — continued. 
HOME ECONOMICS 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Ruth Adams, Manhattan, Riley 

Helen Josephine Allis, Manhattan, Riley 

Mamie Arnold, Cottonwood Falls, Chase 

Leah Catharine Bailey Topeka, Shawnee 

Orlena Marguerite Baker, Manhattan, Riley 

Anne Estella Barnum, Simpson, Mitchell 

Marcia Beam an, Macksville, Stafford 

(Mrs.) Anna Gish Bellomy, Manhattan, Riley 

Ada Grace Billings, Vermillion, Marshall 

Faye Maurine BoswelL Manhattan, Riley 

Helen Elizabeth Bower, Lincoln, Lincoln 

Edith Alice Boyle, Spivey, Kingman 

Anna Brandner, Florence, Marion 

Mildred Branson, Cambridge, Cowley 

Amy May Briggs, Sedgwick, Harvey 

Fannie Ernestine Brooks, Tescott, Ottawa 

Margaret Isla Bruce, Marquette, McPherson 

Wilma Burtis, Fredonia, Wilson 

Hannah Margaret Campbell, Attica, Harper 

Florence Caton, Foxboro, Massachusetts 

Clara May Christensen, Argentine, Wyandotte 

Mae Coleman, Little Rock, Ar leans as 

Martha Christabel Conrad, Manhattan, Riley 

Kathleen Lenore Conroy, Manhattan, Riley 

Grace Nancy Cool, Glasco, Cloud 

Grace Lydia Currie, Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Augusta Davies, Green, Clay 

Wilma Louise Davis, Manhattan, Riley 

Florence Edith Dodd, Langdon, Reno 

Mae Doonan, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Faith Elizabeth Earnest, Washington, Washington 

Frances Floretta Ewalt Manhattan, Riley 

Martha Fern Faubion, Manhattan, Riley 

Ruth Marie Ferguson, Manhattan, Riley 

Nelle Flinn, . Admire, Lyon 

Anna Grace Fox, Lamed, Pawnee 

Ruth Esther Frush, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Margaret Elizabeth Fuller, Topeka, Shawnee 

Grace Gardner, Hartford, Lyon 

Dorothea Pearl G-ish, Manhattan, Riley 

Elizabeth Emm* Gish, Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Alice Gish, Sterling, Rice 

Gladys Gist, Manhattan, Riley 

Marie Antoinette Goodman, Dwight, Morris 

Mamie Blanche Gorrell, Wa Keeney, Trego 

Leona Sanders Graves Inman, McPherson 

Mary Greenawalt, Princeton, Franklin 

Roma Lillian Greene Newton, Harvey 

Josie Griffith, Manhattan, Riley 

Leota Lee Gromer Manhattan, Riley 

Esther Gygax, Osborne, Osborne 

Blanche Mary Haggman, Kackley, Republic 

Hildegarde Elulia Harlan, Manhattan, Riley 

Verda Harris, Manhattan, Riley 

Mabel Joy Harrison, Manhattan, Riley 

Elsie Elnora Hart, Edgar, Nebraska 

Edna Avis Hawkins, . „, Lincoln, Lincoln • 

Helene Held Clay Center, Clay 

Nettie Hendrickson, Manhattan, Riley 

Alta Sarah Hepler, Manhattan, Riley 

Bessie May Hildreth, Altamont, Labette 

Ruth Brandt Hoffman, Newton, Harvey 

Lydia Helena Hokanson, Marquette, McPherson 

Bertha Belle Hole, Manhattan, Riley 

Esther Grace Hole, Manhattan, Riley 

Esther Lydia Hostetler, Manhattan, Riley 

Mabel Marguerite Hunter, Manhattan, Riley 

Ruth Amelia Hutchings Manhattan, Riley 

Katherine Ruth Hutto, . . Manhattan, Riley 

Agnes McCord Irwin, Manhattan, Riley 

Pearl LaClair Jacques, Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Florence Jones, Salina, Saline 

Florence Justin, Manhattan, Riley 

Wilma Anna Kammeyer, Manhattan, Riley 

Vera Elma King, Milo, Lincoln 

Bertha Blanche Lauger Manhattan, Riley 

Eva Myrtle Lawson, ..... . . McPherson, McPherson 

Anna Virginia Layton, Blue Rapids, Marshall 



List of Students 333 

SOPHOMOEES — continued. 
Names p 08t -gi ce (county or state) 

Mabel Lorraine, Leuszler, Linn, Washington 

Anna May Lormier, Willis, Brown 

Vera Anna McCoy, Imperial, Neoraslca 

Irene Margaret McElroy, Manhattan, Riley 

Bessie McGraw Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Elizabeth McKmlay, Udall Cowley 

Ora Mae McMillen Topeka, Shawnee 

Elizabeth Abbie March Topeka, Shawnee 

Elsie Beth Marshall Clifton, Washington 

Sarah Janet Marty, Manhattan, Riley 

w Cl1 ? i* a ^ lm ' Sterling, Rice 

S ? za 5? th SI 8 ' Topeka, Shawnee 

Ella Mae Miltner, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Helen Joyce Moore, Manhattan, Riley 

Marie Moses Manhattan, Riley 

^ary Rose Moss, Enreka, Greenwood 

Helen Munger, Carbondale, Osage 

Vman Neiswender, Nortl1 Topeka, Shawnee 

Edna JJay Oetmger, AIma Wabaunsee 

Oleda May Pace Osawatomie, Miami 

Susan Rufina Paddock, Blue Mound, Linn 

Ruth Louise Pattm, Topeka, Shawnee 

Sara Jane Patton, Hiawatha, Brown 

Hazel Berdella Peck, Manhattan, Riley 

E la Bunlap Pkemcie, Tonganoxie, Leavenworth 

Gladys Marie Phillips, Manhattan, Riley 

Edna Pi.ckrell, Manhattan Riley 

Marie Pickrell . ., Manhattan, Riley 

Helen Mitchell Pitcairn, Concordia, Cloud 

Cora Alberta Pitman, Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Elizabeth Poison, Fredonia, Wilson 

Nellie Pope, Hoxie, Sheridan\ 

Iva Holt Porter, Glen Elder, Mitchell 

Mary Louise Price, m Winfield, Iowa 

Gpurney Augusta Prier, Marion, Marion 

Hermina Meahna Quantic, , , Riley Riley 

Golda Lucile Rader, . . '. Manhattan, Riley 

Cassie Kathenne Richards Manhattan Riley 

Nannie Clytice Ross, Burrton, Harvev 

Grace Ethelynne Rudy, Manhattan, Riley 

Mabel Gertrude Ruggels, Beverly, Lincoln 

Margaret Ursula Schneider, ........ Logan Phillips 

Pearl Eunice Schowalter, Halstead, Harvey 

Evelyn Schriver, Halstead, Harvey 

Laura Lee Sethff, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Gladys Shmn . Manhattan, Riley 

Florence Hazel Smith Manhattan, Riley 

Esther Emily St. John, Manhattan, Riley 

Hazel Belle St. John, Manhattan, Riley 

Kate Sumners Riley, Riley 

Pearl Ellice Tackett, Yates Center, Woodson 

Emma Elizabeth Taylor, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Ethel Tharp, Hutchinson, Reno 

Irene Venita Thompson, Topeka, Shawnee 

Eva Esther Townsend, Nickerson, Reno 

Verna Treadway, Newton, Harvey 

Mary TunstaU, Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Edith Updegraff, Topeka, Shawnee 

Wilma Tan Horn Overbrook, Osage 

Avis Louise Voak, Worthington, Minnesota 

Irene Eleanor Walker Manhattan, Riley 

Edith Mary Walsh, Manhattan, Riley 

Mamie Wartenbee, Liberal, Seward 

Lois Wemmer, ............. Princeton, Franklin 

Laura Augusta Westphal, Manhattan Riley 

Grace Willits, Topeka, Shawnee 

Emily Thomas Wilson, Manhattan, Riley 

Ida May Wilson, Manhattan, Riley 

Winnie Pay Wilson, Formoso, Jewell 

Eleanor Witham, 

Lois Witham, Manhattan, Riley 

Elizabeth Pearl Woods Wichita, Sedgwick 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

Francis Waite Albro, Manhattan, Riley 

Edith Louise Alsop, Wakefield, Clay 

Edith Emma Arnold, Manhattan, Riley 

Wellington Tufts Brink, Manhattan, Riley 

Mortimer Lester Durbon, Junction City, Geary 



334 Kansas State Agricultural College 

SOPHOMORES — continued. 
Names Post ofice {county or state) 

Samuel Ray Gardner, Hartford, Lyon 

Earl Raymond Harrouff Inman, McPherson 

Charles Hopper, Manhattan, Riley 

Ralph Parkinson Howell Morganville, Clay 

Garnet Hutto Manhattan, Riley 

Myrtel Johnson, Manhattan, Riley 

Ward Lobdell, Great Bend, Barton 

Albert Bruce Lovett, Larned, Pawnee 

Robert Urey McClanahan, Manhattan, Riley 

David Earl Moore, Idana, Clay 

Raymond Reed Neiswender, ....... Topeka, Shawnee 

Guy Clifton Omer, Mankato, Jewell 

Edward John Otto, . . Riley, Riley 

Earl win Arthur Pearce, . Edgerton, Johnson 

Rayburn Potter, Clifton, "Washington 

Merle Elliott Ranney, Clyde, Cloud 

Emmett "Warren Skinner, Manhattan, Riley 

Mary Louetta Taylor, Manhattan, Riley 

Harry Fred Vaupel, New Cambria, Saline 

Howard Oscar "Wagner, Manhattan, Riley 

Arthur Walker t Manhattan, Riley 

Lyndell Whitehead, Walnut, Crawford 

Vera Isabel Whitmore, Manhattan, Riley 

Fred Woodward, El Dorado, Butler 

INDUSTRIAL JOURNALISM 

Albert Ellis Hylton Manhattan, Riley 

John McClenahan, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Owen Moyd McKittrick, McCracken, Rush 

George Siefkin, Newton, Harvey 

(Mrs.) Margaret James Schattenburg, .... Manhattan, Riley .. 

FRESHMEN 

AGRICULTURE 

Henry Joseph Adams, Topeka, Shawnee 

Russell Orville Andruss, Elsmore, Allen 

Walter Hubert Artman, Denison, Jackson 

John Burton Barnes, Bellaire, Smith 

Phillip Asa Barnes, Blue Mound, Linn 

Frederick Harold Bayer, Yates Center, Woodson 

Dee Daniel Bird, Great Bend, Barton 

Carlos Tomas Bischoff, Manhattan, Riley 

Edward James Bogh, Lincoln, Lincoln 

George Adam Bolz Topeka, Shawnee 

Charles Russel Brackney, Burlingame, Osage 

George Harold Brett, jr , . Ponca City, Oklahoma 

Curtis Angle Brewer, Abilene, Dickinsdn 

Earl Briney, Abilene, Dickinson 

Luster Roy Brooks, Winfield, Cowley 

Wesley Gordon Bruce, New York, New York 

Ralph Dilly Buell, Winfield, Cowley 

Floyd Hine Buvinger, Chetopa, Labette 

James Carle, . , . . Gretna, Phillips 

Welknan Dean Chaffin, Raymore, Missouri 

Clarence Chapman, Manhattan, Riley 

Stewart Clarke, Marysville, Marshall 

Robert Earl Cleland, Manhattan, Riley 

Carl Carey Cope Holton, Jackson 

Clyde Cordts, Overbrook, Osage 

Harold Robert Cozine, Linn, Washington 

Harold Brink Cravens, Parsons, Labette 

Blaine Crow, Manhattan, Riley 

Jay Howenstine Cushman, Emporia, Lyon 

Neil Edwin Dale, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Paul Oscar Dannevik, Troy, Doniphan 

Frank Alfred Detweiler Summerfield, Marshall 

Glen Ewing Devier, Fall River, Greenwood 

Alexey Evguenievich Dobrohotov, Viazniki "Vladim, Russia 

George Emery Dodson, Caney, Montgomery 

Frank Elsworth Dowling, Chicago, Illinois 

Roy Kiefner Durham, Anthony, Harper 

Howard Conwell Edwards, Jewell* Jewell 

Wilbur Gordon Elliott, Sterling, Rice 

Paul John Englund, Falun, Saline 

William Raymond Essick, Eureka, Greenwood 

Myron Lee Eubank, Emporia, Lyon 



List of Students 335 



FRESHMEN — continued. 
Names Post office {county or state) 

Morris Evans, Topeka, Shawnee 

William Lynde Farnsworth, Portis, Osborne 

Warren Fehlman, Manhattan, Riley 

Robert James Fisher, . .' Liberal, Seward 

Edward Raymond Frank, Manhattan, Riley 

Ira Gordon Freeman, Ellsworth, Ellsworth 

Vernon Frank Fritz, Valencia, Shawnee 

Lynn Harold Fuller, Horton, Brown 

John Thomas Furneaux, Moran, Allen 

Cassins Gillespie, Chetopa, Labette 

Otis Benton Glover Oircleville, Jackson 

Wilbur Ross Gore, Manhattan, Riley 

Clarence Owen Grandfield, Maize, Sedgwick 

Robert Marion Greer, Bonner Springs Wvandnt+o 

William Herbert Green Olathe, Johnson WyancU)tte 

Edward Gregory, . . . . : Manhattan, Rilev 

Albert William Griff eth, Barnard, Lincoln 

Ray Harter, St. John, Stafford 

Ernest Clarence Harvey, South Omaha, Nebraska 

Burtis Emerson Heacock, Attica, Harper ' ' 

Carl Lawrence Hedstrom, Dinas, Wallace 

Leslie Henderson, Seneca, Nemaha 

Waldo Frederick Heppe, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Ivan Walter Herriott, Garden City, Finney 

Lee Raeburn Hettick Williamsburg, Franklin 

Lyman Ray Hiatt, Esbon, Sherman 

Douglas Abrjah Hine, . Manhattan, Riley 

Harold Irving Hollister, Quincy, Greenwood 

Madison Lewelen Holroyd, Cedar Vale, Chautauqua 

William Lowell Hook, Rossville, Shawnee 

Jeffrey Horney, *^ Neodesha, Wilson 

Louis Edward Howard, . . , Manhattan, Riley 

Clarence Blythe Howe, Garrison, Pottawatomie 

Carl Fountain Huffman, Tonganoxie, Leavenworth 

D wight Hull, Abilene, Dickinson 

Gustave Arthur Heinig, Wichita, Sedgwick 

John Ralph Hudelson, Pomona, Franklin 

Gilford John Ikenberry, Quinter, Gove 

Glenn William Keith, Belleville, Republic 

Floyd Brode Kelly, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Ross Bartley Keys Winchester, Jefferson 

Arthur Hamilton Knight, Chapman, Dickinson 

Howard Morrison Knox, Garden City, Finney 

Theodore Charles Krigbaum, Bisbee, Arizona 

John Lawrence Lantow, Lyons, Rice 

Lawrence Lykins Lauver, Paola, Miami 

John Linn, Manhattan, Riley 

Harold William Luhnow, Oak Park, Illinois 

Charles Louis Lytle, Wellsville, Franklin 

Ray McClaran, Humboldt, Allen 

Cecil Lyman McFadden, Stafford, Stafford 

Roscoe Irwin MacMillan, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Daniel Claire Marshall, Belle Plaine, Sumner 

William Martin, Wathena, Doniphan 

Carl Ivor Mattson, Manhattan, Riley 

Charles Miles, Garden City, Finney 

Edgar Cruger Miller, Anthony, Harper 

Herbert Proudfit Miller, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Ben Moore, Manhattan, Riley 

Russell Morrison, Sterling, Rice 

Ralph Landis Mosier, ........... Muskogee, Oklahoma 

Harry Allison Murphy Sterling, Rice 

Kenneth Moody Murphy, Pontiac, Illinois 

Richard Baldwin Myers, Jeffersonville, Indiana 

Peter NettervUle Manhattan, Riley 

Arthur Reid Newkirk, Geneseo, Rice 

Dean Orr, Kanona, Decatur 

Robert Osborn, jr., Wichita, Sedgwick 

Ross Palenske, Alma, Wabaunsee 

Earle Peck, •-.... Berryton, Shawnee 

Thomas Edwin Pexton, Carr, Colorado 

Telford Ruddell Pharr, Manhattan, Riley 

Howard Waitman Phillips, Hutchinson, Reno 

William Francis Pickett, Manhattan, Riley 

Floyd Pickrell, * . • Manhattan, Riley 

Chester Lee Reeve, Garden City, Finney 

Robert Hall Rexroad, Darlow, Reno 

Frank Irving Reynolds, Mulvane, Sumner 

George Wilson Rhine Manhattan, Riley 



336 Kansas State Agricultural College 

FRE SHMEN — continued. 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Lyle Verne Rhine, Manhattan, Riley 

Clarence Edwin Roach Manhattan, Riley 

Francisco Rodriguez OeeNez, P. J. 

Harold Adelbert Rohrer, Junction City, Geary 

Charles Lucien Russel, McPherson, McPherson 

Harry S chafer, Mulvane, Sumner 

Carl Schulthess, Horton, Brown 

Gilbert Alexander Searight, Austin, Texas 

Frank Clarence Seeber, Great Bend, Barton 

John Sellon, Kansas City, Missouri 

Sam Sherwood Excelsior Springs, Missouri 

Simon Peter Shields, . . . " Lost Springs, Marion 

Piatt Noah Slough, Quincy, Greenwood 

Harold Wyllis Snell, Douglass, Butler 

Fayette Foster Spencer, Circleviile, Jackson 

Emmet Hibler Stambaugh, ." Maplehjll, Wabaunsee 

Herman Joseph Steinbuchel, Wichita, Sedgwick 

John Robert Stratford, El Dorado, Butler 

Joseph Burton Sweet, Manhattan, Riley 

Clifford Swenson, Lindsborg, McPherson 

Sherman Alton Swift, Beloit, Mitchell 

Glen Teeple, Mankato, Jewell 

Charles David Thomas Baxter Springs, Cherokee 

Harold Elliot Thomas, Pratt, Pratt 

Lee Thomas, Baxter Springs, Cherokee 

Frank Sumner Turner, Tonganoxie, Leavenworth 

Halley Clyde Walker Green, Clay 

Owen Walters Roswell, New Mexico 

Ed Mitchell Watkins, Garden City, Finney 

Reed Weimer Chapman, Dickinson 

Carl Ellsworth White Clements, Chase 

Joe Marshall White, Topeka, Shawnee 

Joseph Newton Wilmers Bayfield, Colorado 

Harold Spencer Winn, Wathena, Doniphan 

Adrian Lee Wolfert, Kansas City, Missouri 

Jay Roy Wood Reading, Lyon 

Lawrence Alden Woodworth, Tecumseh, Shawnee 

Wilbur William Wright, Newton, Harvey 

Wilhelm Wunsch, Argonia, Sumner 

James Carl Yost, Vassar, Osage 

Herman Henry Zimmerman, Belle Plaine, Sumner 

Louis Albert Zimmerman, Belle Plaine, Sumner 

VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Aaron Arthur Breeheisen, Edgerton, Johnson 

Ray Nelson Brown, ; . . . Belleville, Republic 

Robert Brown Craig, Manhattan, Riley 

Ernest Eddy, Havensville, Pottawatomie 

John Fitzgerald, Gypsum City, Saline 

Harve Frank, Jewell, Jewell 

John Edward Franz, Rozel, Pawnee 

John Fredenburg, Council Grove, Morris 

David Maxon Green Manhattan, Riley 

Henry Arthur Hoffman, Princeton, Franklin 

William Albert Houk, Americus, Lyon 

Edmund Hubert Hovey, Cambridge, Cowley 

Dan Jackson, Mayo, Comanche 

Charles Earl Long, Blue Mound, Linn 

Clarence Hugh Rawlings, Havensville, Pottawatomie 

Karl Richardson, Circleville, Jackson 

Harry Van Tuyl, Basehor, Leavenworth 

Lloyd Leroy Whitney, Lyndon, Osage 

Josiah Wistar Worthington, Richfield, Morton 

ARCHITECTURE 

Oliver Frederick Barnhart, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

William Richard Cristler, Edgerton, Johnson 

Earl Kesinger, Greensburg, Kiowa 

Theodore Legrand Shuart, Hutchinson, Reno 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Lawrence Claud Bernard, Sharon Springs, Wallace 

David Winfred Burch, Salina, Saline 

Albert Clarence Bux, Meriden, Jefferson 

Bung Chew Choy, Honolulu, Hawaii 

William Hoy Chun, Honolulu, Hawaii 

Henry Cornell, Wakefield, Clay 

Simon Edward Croyle, New Cambria, Saline 



List of Students 337 

FRE SHMEN — continued. 
Names p st office (county or state) 

Amon Carl Davis, Harper, Harper 

Roscoe Vanda Elliott, . . Medicine Lodge, Barber 

Don Groth, Bushton, Rice 

Jesse Alonzo Hendrickson St. John, Stafford 

Robert Kerr, jr., Wakefield, Clay 

Addison Kendall McKinnell Maize, Sedgwick 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Thomas Alleman, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

William Harold Balderston Dodge City, Ford 

James Glenn Bell, Altoona, Wilson 

Paul Adelbert Carnahan, Manhattan, Riley 

Albert Ross Challans, Newton, Harvey 

Ralph Edwin Collins, Wellsville, Franklin 

William O'Neil Collins, Wellsville, Franklin 

John Edward Conner, Circleville, Jackson 

Francis Dunlap, Keats, Riley 

William Christoph Ernsting, Ellinwood, Barton 

Jefferson Harold Flora, Manhattan, Riley 

Kenneth Francis, Neosho Falls, Woodson 

Ernest Franklin Golding, Newton, Harvey 

Clarence Hildebrand, Manhattan, Riley 

Olin Arthur Hindman, Rush Center, Rush 

William Eugene Houser Topeka, Shawnee 

James Allison Hull Stafford, Stafford 

Carl David Hultgren, Topeka, Shawnee 

Wallace Darwin Hutchinson, Wichita, Sedgwick 

William Chester Humphrey, Hoxie, Sheridan 

Thomas Hardman Jester, Oxford, Sumner 

Vernon Marion Johnson, Kinsley, Edwards 

Herbert Bernard King, Arkansas City, Cowley 

Rufus Stephen Kirk, Manhattan, Riley 

William Klooz, Manhattan, Riley 

Charles Edward Lavender, Alton, Osborne 

John Benton Mason, Stockdale, Riley 

George Harold Morehouse, Little River, Rice 

Ivan Harry Nash, Waterville, Marshall 

Clair Newton, Bronson, Bourbon 

Russell Harry Oliver, Oxford Sumner 

Augustus Stanley Parr, Rossville, Shawnee 

John Patton, Chase, Rice 

Perie Richmond Pitts, Manhattan, Riley 

Leslie Lee Purdy, Fairview, Brown 

Oliver Keith Rumbel, Moran, Allen 

Lloyd Lester Sissell, Cuba, Republic 

William Arthur Smith, Pittsburg, Crawford 

Wade McKinley Snider, Abilene, Dickinson 

Sidney Robbins Swaller, Clay Center, Clay 

Jesse Harold Talmage, WaKeeney, Trego 

Newton Ebenezer Terrill Tisdale, Cowley 

Lester Tubbs, Manhattan, Riley 

Olin Walker, Beloit, Mitchell 

Carl Adolph Wallerstedt, Lindsborg, MePherson 

Carey Ray Witham, Manhattan, Riley 

Frank Earl Whipple, Manhattan, Riley 

Ezra Taggart Whitcomb, Cedar Point, Chase 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

William Frederick Asendorf, Garden Plain, Sedgwick 

Charles Cotting Brown, Ellsworth, Ellsworth 

William Newton Caton, Winfield, Cowley 

Charles Kenneth Champlin, Canton, MePherson 

Robert Travis Corbin, " Manhattan, Riley 

George Stephen Dennett, Harper, Harper 

Lester Henry Drayer, Manhattan, Riley 

George Livingston Fickel, Manhattan, Riley 

William Walter Frizell, Lamed, Pawnee 

Leon Bernard Garvin, Erie, Neosho 

Lawton Morrison Hanna, Clay Center, Clay 

Keith Egleston Kinyon, Vernon, Woodson 

Loren Little Lupfer, Larned, Pawnee 

Edwin Francis Meara, Axtell, Marshall 

Edgar Andrew Moffat, Great Bend, Barton 

Joe Anthony Novak, Ellsworth, Ellsworth 

Url Nudson, Garrison, Pottawatomie 

Howard Walter Orr, Topeka, Shawnee 

William Ewing Paterson, Yates Center, Woodson 



338 Kansas State Agricultural College 

FRE SHMEN — continued. 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Christian Pfaff, Hazelton, Barker 

Carew Henry Sanders, Manhattan, Riley- 
Arthur Lorenzo Seeber, Great Bend, Barton 

Gabe Alfred Sellers, Great Bend, Barton 

Russel Robert Smith, Stockton, Rooks 

Earl Ebenezer Swenson, Lindsborg, Mcpherson 

Lawrence Arthur Tilton, Garrison, Pottawatomie 

Gustav Peter Toews, Newton, Harvey 

Rees Conway Warren, Manhattan, Riley 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Essie Jane Anderson, . Lawrence, Douglas 

Edith Irene Andrew Madison, Greenwood 

Madge Gladys Austin, Manhattan, Riley 

Blanche Baird, Manhattan, Riley 

Eunice Ann Baird, Cherryvale, Montgomery 

Rose Theodora Baker, Topeka, Shawnee 

Mildred Gertrude Barnes, Rock Creek, Jefferson 

Ruth Sarah Barnes, Rock Creek, Jefferson 

Mildred Edith Batchelor, Manhattan, Riley 

Anna Pearl Bates, Dighton, Lane 

Myrtle Ethel Bauerfind Minneapolis, Ottawa 

Dora Wilhelmina Bayer, Toronto, Woodson 

Mildred Lucille Beane, Chillicothe, Missouri 

Beryl Beaty, Linn, Washington 

Laura Elizabeth Becker, Logan, Phillips 

Clara Merle Beeman, Topeka, Shawnee 

Lois Viola Bellomy, Manhattan, Riley 

Ada Berger, Lawrence, Douglas 

Neva Betz, Asherville, Mitchell 

Martha Estella Blain, Manhattan, Riley 

Charlotte Bolen, Le Roy, Coffey 

Nelly Elizabeth Boyle, Spivey, Kingman 

Judith Rae Briggs, Hope, Arkansas 

May Brookshier, Chillicothe, Missouri 

Vivian Eves Brothers, Agra, Phillips 

Hazel Elizabeth Brown, Chester, Nebraska 

Helen Mildred Brown, Holton, Jackson 

Lora Kathryn Brown, Dwight, Morris 

Mildred Browning Linwood, Leavenworth 

Nettie Brush, Newton, Harvey 

Hallie May Bryson, Manhattan, Riley 

Lillian Anna Buchheim, Winkler, Riley 

Elizabeth Burnham, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Irene Mary Barrett, Manhattan, Riley 

Evangeline Casto, Wellsville, Franklin 

Josephine Chamberlain, Clarendon, Texas 

Doris Etta Chase, Hiawatha, Brown 

Blanche Clark, Eskridge, Wabaunsee 

Rachel Clark, Eskridge, Wabaunsee 

Myrtle Antonia Collins, Essex, Iowa 

Vesta Vine Cool, Glasco, Cloud 

Alva Lee Cooper, Olathe, Johnson 

Margaret Anna Couch, Phillipsburg, Phillips 

Alice Marjorie Crichton, Topeka, Shawnee 

Leslie Crittenden, Coolidge, Hamilton 

Esther Curtis, Manhattan, Riley 

Ruth Christina Daum Eureka, Greenwood 

Elma Mary Davidson, Yates Center, Woodson 

Margaret May DeForest, .- Lawrence, Douglas 

Janie DePriest, Salina, Saline 

Mrs. Ellen Josephine Dwyer, Scottsville, Mitchell 

Mabel Ruth Edmond Kansas City, Missouri 

Leuella Einsel, Greensburg, Kiowa 

Emma Gertrude Ellersick, Comstock, Nebraska 

Emma Juanita Engle, Abilene, Dickinson 

Alma Ruth Ennefer Pleasanton, Linn 

Anna Dorothea Ernsting, Ellinwood, Barton 

Rosanna Farquhar, Manhattan, Riley 

Katherine Fauleoner, Clay Center, Clay 

Christina Grace Figley, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Mary Elizabeth Pink, Pormoso, Jewell 

Marjorie Adelaide Garnett, Topeka, Shawnee 

Helen Rae Garvie, Abilene, Dickinson 

Edythe lone Gilliland, Auburn, Nebraska 

Florence Goddard, Minneapolis, Ottawa 

Altha Teresa Goodwyn, Minneapolis, Ottawa 

Stella Jane Gould, Wilroads, Ford 

Maude Rosaline Greub, Kirwin, Phillips 



List of Students 339 

FRE SHMEN — continued,. 
Names p os t office, (county or state) 

Hazel Kathryn Groff, Nortonville, Jefferson 

Dorothy Hadley, Topeka, Shawnee 

Gertrude Hale, Lebanon, Smith 

Charlotte Hall, . Chillicothe, Missouri 

Oleo Elizabeth Hamilton, Little River, Rice 

Elizabeth Lillian Hargrave, Richmond, Franklin 

Zora Harris, Manhattan, Riley 

gene Held, . . -. Clay Center, Clay 

Helen Florence Henry, TJdall, Cowley 

Mabel Ruth Henry, Junction City, Geary 

Frances Hildebrand, Coffeyville, Montgomery 

Flora Marie Hill, Lubbock, Texas 

Mabel Ellen Hinds, Pleasanton, Linn 

Nellie Maria Hord, Colony, Anderson 

Mabel Donna Howard, Cottonwood Falls, Chase 

Ellen Elizabeth Howell, Garnett, Anderson 

Ruth Kathrina Huff, Chapman, Dickinson 

Ethel Rebecca Hunt, Irving, Marshall 

Edith Brooks Inskeep, Manhattan, Riley 

Pansy Jackson, Manhattan, Riley 

Celia Belletta Johnson, Dresden, Decatur 

Estella Johnson, Highland, Doniphan 

Hazel Ruth Johnston, . Wichita, Sedgwick 

Marian Bell Keys, ............ Enid, Oklahoma 

Hazel Elizabeth Kiser, TJdall, Cowley 

Evelyn Nellie Kjzer, Manhattan, Riley 

Hazel Beatrice Kramer, Auburn, Shawnee 

Amy Alice Lamberson, Lyons, Rice 

Lottie Lasswell, Havensville, Pottawatomie 

Mayme Elizabeth Linten, Denison, Jackson 

Jessie May Littrell, Nelson, Nebraska 

Emily Lofinck, Manhattan, Riley 

Louella Elizabeth McCall Wa Keeney, Trego 

Majorie McClure, Blue Mound, Linn 

Agnes May McCorkle, Holton, Jackson 

Cynthia Ellen McGuire, Manhattan, Riley 

Bernice Elvira McKeerer, Topeka, Shawnee 

Beulah Lillis McNall, Gaylord, Smith 

Mary Mack, Manhattan, Riley 

Gladys Magill, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Lethe Marshall, Manhattan, Riley 

Thelma Eloise Marty, Smith Center, Smith 

Ada Valentine Mathes, Kinsley, Edwards 

Kittie May, La Cygne, Linn 

Tressie Edna May, Manhattan, Riley 

Bernice Michael, St. Joseph, Missouri 

Grace Hilton Willis Middleton, ....... Kansas City, Missouri 

Agnes Christina Miller, Udall, Cowley 

Katherine Miller Abbeyville, Reno 

Lucille Mills Topeka, Shawnee 

Goldie Elizabeth Mitchell, Brookville, Saline 

Stella Eliza Mitchell. Valley Falls, Jefferson 

Harriett Plummer Morris, ........ Wichita, Sedgwick 

Laura Mueller Wichita, Sedgwick 

Florence Alberta Musser Abilene, Dickinson 

Buenta Myers, ••.... Clay Center, Clay 

Anna Monroe Neer, Cambridge, Cowley 

Junia Edith Nelson, Wamego, Pottawatomie 

Ninetta Marie Neusbaum, .-••.... Manhattan, Riley 

Bertha Estella Newlin Wetmore, Nemaha 

Mary Francis Nicolay, Manhattan, Riley 

Lettie Maybelle Noyce '•.... Stockton, Rooks 

Ruth Elizabeth Orr, . Manhattan, Riley 

Caroline Roberts Packard, ......... Manhattan, Riley 

Edith Parkhurst, Kinsley, Edwards 

Anna Lillian Patton, Manhattan, Riley 

Clara Viola Peterson, Essex, Iowa 

Alma Luella Pile, Arkalon, Seward 

Lael Louise Porter, Deadwood, South Dakota 

Nina Mae Powell, Athol, Smith 

Elva Quisenbery, Lyons, Rice 

Laura Mary Ramsey, Topeka, Shawnee 

Ruth Bernita Rathbone, Manhattan, Riley 

Florence Eulalia Ridings, Solomon, Dickinson 

Gretta Roach, Manhattan, Riley 

Mildred Robinson, Salina, Saline 

Fern Martha Roderick, Attica, Harper 

Bertha Root, Brookville, Saline 

Mabel Letitia Root, Centralia Nemaha 



340 Kansas State Agricultural College 

FRE SHMEN — continued. 
, Names Post office (county or state) 

Carrie Ruffner, Beloit, Mitchell 

Anita Russell, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Florence Lorena Russell, Stafford, Stafford 

Marie Sch.ulth.eis, Hoxie, Sheridan 

Bessie Melorah Scranton, Syracuse. Hamilton 

Edith Harriett Simpson, Kansas City, Missouri 

Maud Ernestine Sjolander, Topeka, Shawnee 

Georgia Yantis Sloan, Beloit, Mitchell 

Mildred Emily Smith, Burlingame, Osage 

Bernice Barbara Soller, Washington, Washington 

Mary Ruth Stevenson, Paola, Miami 

Lulu Eleanor Stewart, Independence, Montgomery 

Amelia Cora Still, ." Manhattan, Riley 

Edna Mae Stines, Yates Center, Woodson 

Viola Stockwell, Larned, Pawnee 

Ruth LaVerne Stover Lincoln Lincoln 

Iva "Viola Strebel, Alton, Osborne 

Lena Louise Strieby Burlington, Coffey 

Josephine Sublette, Topeka, Shawnee 

Alice Mae Sweet Burlington, Coffey 

Corinne Sweet, Holton, Jackson 

Edith Tempero, Clay Center, Clay 

Madge Rector Thompson, Hill City, Graham 

Magdelen Florence Thompson Alma, Wabaunsee 

Daisy Bell Tolbert, Manhattan, Riley 

Martha Byrd Tunstall, Manhattan, Riley 

Adelaide Rebecca Updegraff, Maplehill, Wabaunsee 

Cynova Eunice Walker, St. Joseph, Missouri 

Frances Josephine Walsh, Clay Center, Clay 

Harriett Lanette Ward, Osborne, Osborne 

Charlotte Pearl Wartenbee, Liberal, Seward 

Marguerite Marie Weaver, Alma, Wabaunsee 

Mary Elizabeth Weible, Topeka, Shawnee 

Pearl Elizabeth Welty, Sterling, Rice 

Aline Alexander Williams Wichita, Sedgwick 

Nina Marie Williams, Winfield, Cowley 

Genevieve Wilson, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Vida Neil Wilson, Formoso, Jewell 

Elsie Wolfenbarger, . . . Winkler, Riley 

Fay Emma Wright, - Muskogee, Oklahoma 

Edith May Yoho, Pratt, Pratt 

Matilda Louisa Ziller, Manhattan, Riley 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

Clara Mildred Abel, Ness City, Ness 

Ora Roland Abel, Ness City, Ness 

John William Barker, Pratt, Pratt 

Hollis Lee Roy Barnes, Agra, Phillips 

Oliver Wendel Broberg, Manhattan, Riley 

Emma Alina Brosh, • Narka, Republic 

Harry Ray Bryson, Manhattan, Riley 

Paul David Buchanan, Chanute, Neosho 

Vilona Cutler, Anthony, Harper 

Guy Delaney, Waterville, Marshall 

William Taylor Douglas, Jewell City, Jewell 

Lewis Albert Dubbs, . Ransom, Ness 

Joha Burton Elliot, Manhattan, Riley 

Herbert Linwood Freese, Wakefield, Clay 

Effie Marial Hand, Clay Center, Clay 

John Benjamin Hinds, Pleasanton, Linn 

Leona Mae Hoag, Mankato, Jewell 

Anna Howard, Manhattan, Riley 

John Oscar Johnson, Dwight, Morris 

Philip Alexander Kennieott, Woodbine, Dickinson 

Brice John King, Centralia, Nemaha 

Russell Orlando Lowrance Thayer, Neosho 

Ralph Francois Lucier, Abilene, Dickinson 

Scott Rayden MacLeod, Holton, Jackson 

James Makins, Abilene, Dickinson 

Walter Matteson, Nowata, Oklahoma 

Charles Curtis May, Holton, Jackson 

Anna Rose Oberhelman, Leonardville, Riley 

William Byron Orange, Manhattan, Riley 

Vera Grace Peake Belleville, Republic 

Harry Philip Resnick, Newark, New Jersey 

Julien Van Cleave Root, Topeka, Shawnee 

Iris Russell, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Phil Alvin Russell, Paola, Miami 



List of Students 341 



FRE SHMEN — continued. 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Elwin Leslie Smith, Colony, Anderson 

Roy Sterling, Clay Center, Clay 

Mary Fidelia Taylor, ' Newton, Harvey 

Carl Morgan Thomas, Portis, Osborne 

Insley Johnston "Walker, "Wichita, Sedgwick 

Merl Watson, Claflin, Barton 

Joe Weaver, . Concordia, Cloud 

Eva Emmaline Wood, Manhattan, Riley 

John Clendenin Wood, Anthony, Harper 

INDUSTRIAL JOURNALISM 

Thompson Fulton Blackburn, Anthony, Harper 

William Edwin Burwell, Jarbalo, Leavenworth 

Grover Samuel Easter, Abilene, Dickinson 

Paul Faulconer, Clay Center, Clay 

Ralph Harold Heppe, Wichita, Sedgwick 

William Brown Kappel, Glasco, Cloud 

John Edgar McHarg, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Everett Gladstone Shimmin, Manhattan, Riley 

Charles Leroy Thomas, Manhattan, Riley 

THIRD YEAR, SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

Kate Littelton Briggs, Olathe, Johnson 

Edith Myrtle Limbocker Manhattan, Riley 

Alice Williams, . . Sylvan Grove, Lincoln 

SECOND YEAR, SCHOOL OP AGRICULTURE 

Daniel Abel, Ness City, Ness 

Harry Hamilton Bearman, Johnson, Stanton 

Elmer George Becker, Meriden, Jefferson 

Arthur Ernest Bentley, Yukon, Oklahoma 

Alma Franc Bishop, Glasco, Oloud 

David Loring Cahill, Lucas, Russell 

Lola Anna Campbell Garden City, Finney 

Lou Campbell, Mapleton, Bourbon 

Letha Viola Cooper, Manhattan, Riley 

Franklin Dave Davis, St. George, Pottawatomie 

May Dewey, Manhattan, Riley 

George Edward Fawl, Silver Lake, Shawnee 

Frank Harold Gulick, Winfield, Cowley 

Imo Jessie Hays, Manhattan, Riley 

Henry Glenn Hollister, Cleburne, Riley 

Madge Eleva Hixon, Manhattan, Riley 

Hattie Genevieve Jackson Manhattan, Riley 

Otto Fred Richard Jacobs, Luplingen, Prussia 

Donald Grant Krudop, Manhattan, Riley 

Lillie Loy, "Vesper, Lincoln 

Don McCormiek, Zeandale, Riley 

Foster Morton, Green, Clay 

Marie Elizabeth Nauman, Kinsley, Edwards 

Edwin Harold Patterson, Manhattan, Riley 

Thomas Floyd Ratcliff, Dexter, Cowley 

William Dennis Scully, Belvue, Pottawatomie 

Almeda Smith, Manhattan, Riley 

Newton Audrey Smith, Farlington, Crawford 

Donald Cheney Thayer, Manhattan, Riley 

Jesse Collins Wingfield Junction City, Geary 

Harry Palmer Witham, Manhattan, Riley 

Mabel Claire Witt, . ' Chanute, Neosho 

FIRST YEAR, SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

Joseph Leo Atkinson, Plymouth, Lyon 

Milly Anderson, Ashland, Clark 

Laura Gertrude Andrews, Hansford, Teccas 

Otto Curt Balzer, Inman, McPherson 

Sheridan Edwin Banks, Milton, Kentucky 

Forrest Wilbur Barber, Manhattan, Riley 

Thurman Bryan Barker, Bethel, Wyandotte 

Harold Leigh Baum, Phillipsburg, Phillips 

Emma Elizabeth Bennett, Soldier, Jackson 

John William Bierer, jr., Wichita, Sedgwick 

Anna Pearle Biggs, Severy, Greenwood 

John Oliver Bircher, . Kanopolis, Ellsworth 



342 Kansas State Agricultural College 

FIRST YEAR, SCHOOL OP AGRICULTURE— continued. 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Lee Bonar, " Valley Palls, Jefferson 

Walter Oscar Bowell, Kensington, Smith 

Ruth Mae Bowers, Holcomb, Finney 

Ruth Hazel Branch, Manhattan, Riley 

Ed Earl Bright, Morrowville, Washington 

Clarence Curtis Brown, Dwight, Morris 

Floyd Brown, Sylvan Grove, Lincoln 

John David Brown, Dinas, Wallace 

James Warren Callahan, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Jamie Irene Cameron, Junction City, Geary 

Violet Christina Carlson, Jamestown, Cloud 

Hobart Zenas Cammack, Manhattan, Riley 

Chester Mont Carpenter, Haviland, Kiowa 

Wallace Clapp, Logan, Phillips 

Everett Pardon Colburn, Manhattan, Riley 

John Warren Conrow, Manhattan, Riley 

Earl Bradley Cory, Belleville, Republic 

Samuel Cowan, Manhattan, Riley 

Emery Melborn Cox, White City, Morris 

Gladys Anna Craig, Manhattan, Riley 

Ada Elnora Crotinger, Manhattan, Riley 

Verne Lloyd Culver, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Dexter Verrill Daggett, Howard, Elk 

Ralph Morgan Davidson Topeka, Shawnee 

Ruth Davies, Arkalon, Seward 

Orrin Leonard Davis, Salina, Saline 

George Norton Dearden, Mayetta, Jackson 

Emma Martha Delfs, Inman, McPherson 

Henry Delfs, Americus, Lyon 

Carl Emerson Depue, Drexel, Missouri 

Porter Mayer Gobbs, Burden, Cowley 

David Edgar, Beaumont, Butler 

John Thomas Evans, New York, N. 7. 

Ross Ray Evarts, Hiawatha, Brown 

Stephen LeRoy Ferguson, Cave, Gray 

Hugh Miller Freemlm, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Bertha Marie Frey, Manhattan, Riley 

Archie Clark Fry, Valley Center, Sedgwick 

Horace Fullerton, Hazelton, Barber 

Lester Frank Gfeller, Junction City, Geary 

Rhea Gilbert, Medicine Lodge, Barber 

Charles Howard Good, Perry, Jefferson 

Ethel Grace Gorton, Manhattan, Riley 

Fannie Harriet Gorton, Manhattan, Riley 

John Byron Gorton, Manhattan, Riley 

Merrill Bird Gorton, Manhattan, Riley 

Wesley Clark Graffham, Homewood, Franklin 

Will Ely Grant, Manhattan, Riley 

Basil Ambrose Green, Mankato, Jewell 

Lily Elizabeth Guilfoil, Wamego, Pottawatomie 

William Guilfoil Wamego, Pottawatomie 

Eslie Edgar Gulick, Winfield, Cowley 

Elta Elizabeth Haege, Manhattan, Riley 

Ford Haggerty, Greensburg, Kiowa 

Claude Hayes Halsey, Sharon Springs, Wallace 

Marie Halsey, *. Sharon Springs, Wallace 

Wayne Miles Halsey, Sharon Springs, Wallace 

Walter Roy Harder, Minneapolis, Ottawa 

Loyal Harris, Manhattan, Riley 

Roger Harrison, Riley, Riley 

Leroy Neal Hartman, Scottsville, Mitchell 

Maud Ellen Hatfield, Manhattan, Riley 

Floyd Elvin Hays, Stockton, Rooks 

Carl Wilhelm Hellwig, Oswego, Labette 

Noah Zale Herde, Hoyt, Jackson 

Middleton Boriden Herrell, Urich, Missouri 

Irwin Lee Heth, Dover, Shawnee 

Howard Holt Hill, Burlington, Coffey 

Ross Wayne Hill, Manhattan, Riley 

Ward Lucas Hill, Manhattan, Riley 

Ruben Earl Hixon, Manhattan, Riley 

Clarence David Hodge, Parsons, Labette 

Ercil Addison Hoke, Manhattan, Riley 

Maurice Edward Hooper, Junction City, Geary 

Ruth Emma Houk, Americus, Lyon 

Floyd Edgar Hull, Portis, Osborne 

Solomon Willard Jackson Manhattan, Riley 

Irl Redmon John, Manhattan, Riley 

Ward Reynold Johnston, Manhattan, Riley 



List of Students 343 

FIRST YEAR,. SCHOOL OF AGRIRCULTURE— contmued. 
Names Post ojjice {county or state) 

Noble Jones, Reading, Lyon 

William McKinley Kasl, Concordia, Cloud 

Lawrence Woodard Kennedy, Lawrence, Douglas 

Milton Kenoly, \ . . Neodesha, Wilson 

Will Steve Kern, • Fort Madison, Iowa 

Leland Bryan Kilmer, . , Bird City, Cheyenne 

Dorothy Kimball, Manhattan, Riley 

George Brent Kimport, Dellrale, Norton 

John William Kirwan Purcell, Doniphan 

Clarence Albert Klusman, Lenexa, Johnson 

Walter Kramer, .Auburn, Shawnee 

Walter Evan Kroth, Soldier, Jackson 

Harry Benjamin Landis, Kiowa, Barber. 

Ellen Onedia Larsen, Norway, Republic 

Carl Franklin Lasswell, Rossville, Shawnee 

Sarah Letha Lasswell Havensville, Pottawatomie 

Jay Oscar Lee, Ness City, Ness 

Albert Lembright, Dodge City, Ford 

Jay "Van Lindley, Eudora, Douglas 

Clyde Long, ...••-. Manhattan, Riley 

Josie Long, Manhattan, Riley 

Marie Long Manhattan, Riley 

Eugene Sidney Lyons, Lawrence, Douglas 

Leo Plato McClure, Havana, Montgomery 

Ross Isaac McCollough, Rossville, Shawnee 

Charles William McGuire Sharon, Barber 

Joe Alexander McGuire, Manhattan, Riley 

Ray Edward McMoran, iEtna, Barber 

William Mackender Riley, Riley 

Rose Malicky, Oketo, Marshall 

Louise Markley, Bennington, Ottawa 

Chauncy Merritt Matthews, ....•••• Manhattan, Riley 

Harvey Paul Matney, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Ralph Waldo May, Williamstown, Jefferson 

William Harold MediU, Leavenworth, Leavenworth 

Martin Raymond Meyer, Clifton, Washington 

Halford Ernest Moody, Riley, Riley 

Ora Moody, Fort Scott, Bourbon 

Roscoe Moore, Great Bend, Barton 

John Pratt Morris, Emporia, Lyon 

Arthur Lester Morton, Fall River, Greenwood 

Harry Asa Muir, Salina, Saline 

William August Naher, Kansas City, Missouri 

Howard Leigh Neusbaum Manhattan, Riley 

Glen Gilbert Nicholas, Havensville, Pottawatomie 

Lysle Clifford Noffsinger, Osborne, Osborne 

Walter George Oehrle Lawrence, Douglas 

Nellie Orr, Manhattan, Riley 

Albert Victor Pacey, Miltonville, Cloud 

Leonard Pacey, Miltonville, Cloud 

Edward Parrish, Manhattan, Riley 

Ivan Thomas Peppiatt Ellsworth, Ellsworth 

Gertrude Pfeil Manhattan, Riley 

Irene Pieratt, Hartford, Lyon 

Paul Norman Pieratt, Hartford, Lyon 

Mildred Gertrude Pollock, Burlington, Coffey 

Harold William Poort, Topeka, Shawnee 

Mayme Fredareca Postier, Inman, McPherson 

Jay Earl Potter, Barnes, Washington 

Jennie Mary Prebyl, Oketo, Marshall 

George Edward Prewitt, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

John Michael Quinn, Salina, Saline 

Karl Sp angler iQuisenberry, Newton, Harvey 

Irvan William Rahe, . . Winkler, Riley 

Olga Jennette Rail, ............ Hutchinson, Reno 

Lloyd Everett Rains, Manhattan, Riley 

Don Winans Ray, Garnett, Anderson 

Randall Reid, Collyer, Trego 

Zades Richards, Manhattan, Riley 

Fred Lokke Ross, Montrose, Jewell 

Guy Rudy, Manhattan, Riley 

George Eddie Ruggles, Guilford, Wilson 

Albert Henry Saxton, Everest, Brown 

Mary Hazel Schafer, Manhattan, Riley 

"Vernon Scott, Montezuma, Gray 

James Jacob Seright, Lucas, Russell 

James Frank Smid, Fowler, Meade 

Joseph Earl Smid, Fowler, Meade 

Harry McMillen Smith, Codell, Rooks 



344 Kansas State Agricultural College 

FIRST YEAR, SCHOOL OF AGRIRCULTURE— continued. 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Joseph Lucien Snyder, Manhattan, Riley 

Phillip Sylvanis Stephens, Horace, Greeley 

Fred Stephenson, Clements, Chase 

"Ward Clinton Stout, '. Arkalon, Seward 

George Ambrose Stuck, Manhattan, Riley 

Abbie Swafford, Manhattan, Riley 

Herbert Clifford Sylvester, Goodland, Sherman 

Roy Charles Taf t • Hanover, Washington 

Abraham McKinley Tidball Wa Keeney, Trego 

Charles Marion Tillotson, .El Dorado, Butler 

Frank Ernest Trablik, Goodland, Sherman 

Herbert Henry Uhlrig, Wamego, Pottawatomie 

Charlie William Underwood, Lawrence, Douglas 

Cecil Van Meter, St. Joseph, Missouri 

Leslie Wayne Vawter, Carbondale, Osage 

Emmet Daniel Vilander, Manhattan, Riley 

Grace Wagner Junction City, Geary 

John Everett Weeks, Belvue, Pottawatomie 

Cecil Clayton Willars, Glasco, Cloud 

Frank Edward Williams, Harper, Harper 

Oliver Brown Wilson, Topeka, Shawnee 

Clara Rebecca Wismer, Formoso, Jewell 

Jessie Marsdon Witham, Manhattan, Riley 

Frank Weeks Wood, Reading, Lyon 

Hubert Steven Woodard, Eudora, Douglas 

George Wendell Zeller, Manhattan, Riley 

Lulu May Zeller, Manhattan, Riley 

Zell Albert Zordel. Ransom, Ness 

SPECIAL, SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

Clinton Conrad Albers, Hargrave, Rush 

Dora Alley, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Leland Carpenter Allis, Manhattan, Riley 

Eva Emma Anderson, Beattie, Marshall 

John August Anderson, Ottawa, Franklin 

Myrtle Christine Anderson, Vesper, Lincoln 

Esther Etta Andrews, Manhattan, Riley 

John Wendell Andrews, Manhattan, Riley 

Ethel Arnold, .... Manhattan, Riley 

William Allen Atchison Wakarusa, Shawnee 

Harry Austin Manhattan, Riley 

Lillian Belle Baker, Manhattan, Riley 

Ralph Vernon Baker Cherryvale, Montgomery 

Alta Malinda Balch, Formoso, Jewell 

Maye Balch, Formoso, Jewell 

Malvina Maude Baldridge, Manhattan, Riley 

Lowell Edwin Baldwin, Manhattan, Riley 

Herbert Bales, Manhattan, Riley 

Nancy May Barhite, Manhattan, Riley 

Theodore Lawrence Bayer, Yates Center, Woodson 

Arthur Joseph Bayles, Manhattan, Riley 

Esther Grace Bayles, Manhattan, Riley 

Montie Melvel Beaman, Macksville, Stafford 

George Bear, Manhattan, Riley 

Merle Benjamin Beevers, Hamilton, Greenwood 

Don Henry Bell, :y. • . • Neodesha, Wilson 

Selestine Robinson Biggins, Dallas, Texas k 

Harold Bixby, Manhattan, Riley 

Avis Blain, Manhattan, Riley 

Foster Raymond Blockcolsky, Manhattan, Riley 

Elna Elizabeth Blom, . Concordia, Cloud 

Harold Blood, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Joseph Alvin Bogue, Glasco, Cloud 

Nora Margaret Boettcher, Winkler, Riley 

Lillian Bowen, Arnold, Ness 

Arthur William Boyer, Scranton, Osage 

Helen Marie Brady, Manhattan, Riley 

Martha Inez Brandt, Manhattan, Riley 

Herman William Brauer, Herington, Dickinson 

Palmer Fair Bressler Manhattan, Riley 

Arthur Hayes Brewer, Manhattan, Riley 

Don Britton . Mapleton, Bourbon 

Fred Burt Broadbent Beloit, Mitchell 

Irene Dale Brooks, Parsons, Labette 

Zada Agnes Brooks, Tescott, Ottawa 

Mrs. Ella Hutchason Brown, Manhattan, Riley 

Herbert Norton Brown, ......... Simpson, Mitchell 

Arthur Browne, . Burdett, Pawnee 



List of Students 345 



SPECIAL, SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE— continued. 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Richard Hoag Browne, Burdett, Pawnee 

Genevieve Vador Bruce Manhattan, Riley 

Arthur Newton Burditt, Ness City, Ness 

Martha Marie Burnside, Junction City, Geary 

Noel Adrain Burt, Hallet, Hodgeman 

Charles LeRoy Caldwell, Grinnell, Gove 

Julia Helen Caldwell, Oswego, Labette 

John Charles Campbell, Manhattan, Riley 

Levah Campbell, Manhattan, Riley 

Lysle McCord Campbell, Manhattan, Riley 

Evelyn Dulcina Carey, Manhattan, Riley 

Helen Juanita Carey, Manhattan, Riley 

Lucile Margaret Carey, Manhattan, Riley 

Carl Victor Carlson, Manhattan, Riley 

Otto Carlson, Manhattan, Riley 

Teckla Christine Carlson, Olsburg, Pottawatomie 

Clyde Eugene Cave, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Glenn Dell Chartier, Clyde, Cloud 

Sara Chase, Manhattan, Riley 

Francis Neuman Cheatum Langdon, Reno 

Robert Hamlen Che«ney, El Dorado, Butler 

Edwin Christian, • . . . Iola, Allen 

Merrill Aikman Cissell, Manhattan, Riley 

Benjamin Finley Clapham, Lane, Franklin 

Frank Lester Clark, Riley, Riley 

Forrest Edward Clark Manhattan, Riley 

Melvil Cleland Manhattan, Riley 

Tracy Cleland, Manhattan, Riley 

Milton Livingston Coe, Manhattan, Riley 

Russell Fesler Coffey, Geneva, Allen 

Alda Conrow, Manhattan, Riley 

Arthur Everett Cook, . Russell, Russell 

Robert Frances Copple, . Glasco, Cloud 

Alta Mamie Couch, Gardner, Johnson 

Harry Lance Crittenden Coolidge, Hamilton 

Donald Winfield Cronkite St. Joseph, Missouri 

Walter Crotts, Woodsdale, Stevens 

Charles Frederick Croyle, New Cambria, Saline 

Sylvester Owen Cummings, Phillipsburg, Phillips 

David Earl Curry, Dunavant, Jefferson 

Dora Fern Curtis, Manhattan, Riley 

William Henry Curtis, Ogden, Riley 

Mary Danner, Topeka, Shawnee 

Kathryne Dappen, Lost Springs, Marion 

Price Davies, Arkalon, Seward 

Homer DeWitt Davis, Riley, Riley 

Oscar Nuten Davis, Altamont, Labette 

Pearl Robert Davis, Manhattan, Riley 

Raymond Clarence Davis, Manhattan, Riley 

Russell Gordon Davis Bronson, Bourbon 

George DeBaum Bushong, Lyon 

Otto Delfs Inman, McPherson 

Arthur Reginald Denman, Manhattan, Riley 

Eliza Bertha Dennett, Harper, /Harper 

Floyd Everett DeShon, Logan, JPhillips 

Frank Nelson Dick, Parsons, Labette 

Lovie Elizabeth Dittman, Downs, Osborne 

John Julius Doebert, Manhattan, Riley 

John Dow Emporia, Lyon 

Harry Leslie Drown, Manhattan, Riley 

Dora Frances Duffield, Manhattan, Riley 

Robert LeRoy Duffy, Manhattan, Riley 

Merton Edward Dull, Westphalia, Anderson 

John Donlepr Dunlap, Eureka, Greenwood 

Nadia Dturi Manhattan, Riley 

Chester franklin Ebey, Topeka, Shawnee 

John Fredrick Eggeman, Manchester, Oklahoma 

Charles Arthur Ellersick, Comstock, Nebraska 

Maggie Ellis, * Westmoreland, Pottawatomie 

James Culp Elsea, Lake City, Barber 

John Errebo, Yesper, Lincoln 

Martha Errebo Vesper, Lincoln 

Mary Theodora Errebo, Vesper, Lincoln 

Clarence Jinks Etherington, Neal, Greenwood 

Grace Mirriam Ferguson, Manhattan, Riley 

Homer Fink, Manhattan, Riley 

Claude Charles Fish, La Crosse, Rush 

Cora Belle Flanders, Ellsworth, Ellsworth 

Forrest Custer Flora, Manhattan, Riley 

Edith Louie Folger Northbranch, Jewell 



346 Kansas State Agricultural College 

SPECIAL, SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE— -confines. 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Ethel Folger, Northbranch, Jewell 

George Adam Franz, Rozel, Pawnee 

Charles Anthony Frankenhoff, Atchison, Atchison 

Earl Benjamin Fulk, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Lewis Eli Gardner, Manhattan, Riley 

Herman Andrew Gehrke, . . Herington, Dickinson 

Jesse Conrad Geiger, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Ella Gfeller, Junction City, Geary 

George Raymond Giles, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Mary Emma Giles, Manhattan, Riley 

Bernie Gleason Jericho, Vermont 

Estella Glogan, Paxieo, Wabaunsee 

Fred Roy Glover, Wamego, Pottawatomie 

Ray Franklin Glover, Wamego, Pottawatomie 

Jennie Marie Goodsheller, McPherson, McPherson 

Albert Charles Graffham, . Homewood, Franklin 

Jennie Grant, Manhattan, Riley 

Mabel Bertha Green, Oswego, Labette 

Louise Gregory, Manhattan, Riley 

Ward Clarke Griffing, Manhattan, "Riley 

Willis Goodrich Griffing, Manhattan, Riley 

Harold Dwight Grimes, Ottawa, Franklin 

Laura Annie Gustafson, Stockdale, Riley 

Benjamin John Hahne, Dodge City, Ford 

Annie Lucile Haines Chanute, Neosho 

Floyd Hanna, Manhattan, Riley 

Wayne Hanna, Manhattan, Riley 

Frank Hansen, Penalosa, Kingman 

Henry Edward Hanser, . Lenexa, Johnson 

Faith Hathaway Harling, Manhattan, Riley 

Gertrude Elisabeth Harling, Manhattan, Riley 

Jack Calvert Hart, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Ernest Clarence Harvey, South Omaha, Nebraska 

Freda Louise Haslam, Manhattan, Riley 

Clifford Hazen, Wayne, Republic 

Alfred Sidney Heard, Dodge City, Ford 

Charles Arthur Hensleigh, Winchester, Jefferson 

Emra Adam Hepler, Manhattan, Riley 

Nettie Ruth Hepler, Greensburg, Kiowa 

Chester Albern Herrick, Colony, Anderson 

Roscoe Easter Hey, Manhattan, Riley 

Agnes Jane Hickok, New Ulysses, Grant 

George Henry Hill, «... Denison, Jackson 

George Winfred Hinds, Manhattan, Riley 

Agnes Hodgins, Belleville, Republic 

Earnestine Hodgins, Belleville, Republic 

Edna Lethe Hoke, Manhattan, Riley 

Merton Anderson Hoke, Manhattan, Riley 

Harry Stewart Holden, Topeka, Shawnee 

Bertha Lydia Holladay, Wright, Ford 

Leda Leah Holt, MorganvUle, Clay 

Charles Henry Honeywell, Leoti, Wichita 

Samuel Willet Honeywell, Poe, Logan 

Ray Dalton Hooton, Garnett, Anderson 

Dick Hopper, Manhattan, Riley 

David Marion Howard, Manhattan, Riley 

Otis Humphrey, Denison, Jackson 

Mable Amanda Howard, Manhattan, Riley 

Bessie Husband, Speed, Rooks 

Rosa Mary Husband, Speed, Rooks 

Nellie Elizabeth Hunt, Manhattan, Riley 

Ralph Edward Hunter, Palmer, Washington 

Howard Huston, Manhattan, Riley 

Hortensious Lowry Isherwood, Carl Junction, Missouri 

Samuel James, Riley, Riley 

"Vera Louise Johnsmeyer, . Riley, Riley 

Bernice Johnson, Manhattan, Riley 

Harry Don Johnson, Manhattan, Riley 

Huldah Dorothy Johnson, Marquette, McPherson 

Lurenzo Johnson, Manhattan, Riley 

Myron Johnson, Olathe, Johnson 

Anna Marie Johnston, Manhattan, Riley 

Raymond James Jolley Manhattan, Riley 

Arthur Norman Jones, Manhattan, Riley 

Clifford Jones Emporia, Lyon 

Ralph Edward Jones, Moline, Elk 

Francis Norwood Jordan, Manhattan, Riley 

Howard Rodney Joslin, Lincoln, Lincoln 

Horace Lyndon Kapka, Kansas City, Wyandotte 



List of Students 347 

SPECIAL, SCHOOL OF AGRICTJIjTVR'E— continued. 
Names post office (county or state) 

Myron Scott Kelsey, Topeka, Shawnee 

George Ewing Kennedy, Manhattan. Riley 

Arch Kernohan, Nashville, Kingman 

Anna Hermina Kessler Leoti. Wichita 

Clare Kimport, Dellvale, Norton 

Charles King, Olsburg, Pottawatomie 

Jordon Carroll King, Manhattan. Riley 

Willard Lester Kjellin Garrison, Pottawatomie 

Leonard Kline, Topeka, Shawnee 

Jerry Emil Kublik, Caldwell, Sumner 

Dan Glenn Lake Lake City, Barber 

Russell Lake, Lake City, Barber 

Harry Bernard Lamer, Salina, Saline 

Ella Luverne Landon Manhattan. Riley 

Clay Forrest Laude, Rose, "Woodson 

Nyle Eloise Lewallen, Manhattan, Riley 

Chauncey Glenn Lewis, Phillipsburg, Phillips 

Richard Thomas Lough, Fort Scott, Bourbon 

Frank Friend Love Jetmore, Hodgeman 

Lyla Edith Lundberg, Manhattan, Riley 

Clarence Marion Luse, Nortonville, Jefferson 

Emma Ruth McClenahan, Manhattan, Riley 

Maxine McDonald, Manhattan, Riley 

Lester Pearl McDowell Manhattan, Riley 

Gertrude Elizabeth McEiroy, Manhattan, Riley 

Ernest Earl McGuire, Sharon, Barber 

Harold Clarence McKinney, Dresden, Decatur 

Fred McMichael, Plainville, Rooks 

Mathew Edward McMichael, Plainville, Rooks 

Bessie Olive McMillan, . Home, Marshall 

Elsie Faye McSparrin, Manhattan, Riley 

Haley Myrtle McSparrin, Manhattan, Riley 

Donald Eugene MacLeod, Holton, Jackson 

Deyo LeRoy Magee, Downs, Osborne 

Leo Alphonsus Magrath, Williamsburg, Franklin 

Elva Iojae Mall, Manhattan, Riley 

Ivor Orin Mall, Manhattan, Riley 

Earle Allen Manker, Manhattan, Riley 

Glayds Gertrude Markley, Scranton, Osage 

Jessie Marsh, Paola, Miami 

Marguerite Irene Marshall, ........ Clifton, Washington 

Sylvester Samuel Marshall, ........ Manhattan, Riley 

Helen Marten, Leavenworth, Leavenworth 

Calvin Medlin, Chamal Tampo, Mexico 

Ralph Birtrum Medlin, Manhattan, Riley 

George Clarence Mehl, Beloit, Mitchell 

Frank Merrill, . . . Le Roy, Coffey 

Edna Mabel Metz, Jewell, Jewell 

Reuben Miller, Milford, Geary- 
Edna Mitchell, *••.... Manhattan, Riley 

Helen Mitchell, Manhattan, Riley 

Ellis Morrill Moore, Manhattan, Riley 

Lucile Moore, Manhattan, Riley 

Muriel Barbara Moore, .......... Manhattan, Riley 

William Henry Moore, Tribune, Greeley 

William Alfred Moriston, Rosedale, Wyandotte 

Donald Addison Morton, Elk Falls, Elk 

Leo Clifford Moser, Cortland, Republic 

Ruben Reison Mouttet, . . . . Hillsboro, Marion 

Opie Olan Mowry, Luray, Russell , 

Andrew Scott Muir, St#ckton, Rooks 

Zenith Mullen, Labette, Labette 

Edith Lura Nash, Topeka, Shawnee 

Comfort Amanda Neale Manhattan, Riley 

John Rogers Neale, ■ . . Manhattan, Riley 

Philip Earl Neale, Manhattan, Riley 

Chester Parker Neiswender, Topeka, Shawnee 

Harry Hibbard Nelson, Wakarusa, Shawnee 

Oliver Franklin Nelson, Manhattan, Riley 

Frank Nick Ney, Claflin, Barton 

Carrie Ada Neusbaum, Manhattan, Riley 

Barbara Lenora Nicolay, Manhattan, Riley 

Eunice Nicolay, Manhattan, Riley 

Clarence Gilbert Nicholson, Manhattan, Riley 

Henry Otis Niehaus, Whiting, Jackson 

Mabel Alma Niehenke, Manhattan, Riley 

Amanda Christine Olson, Brookville, Saline 

Esther Dora Olson, Brookville, Saline 

Inez Olson, Manhattan, Riley 



348 Kansas State Agricultural College 

SPECIAL, SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE— continued. 
Names Post office (county or state) 

Elver Wayne Osbourn, Manhattan, Riley 

Gladys Mae Owen, Medicine Lodge, Barber 

Helen Agnes Palmer, Manhattan, Eiley 

Walter Bowman Palmer, Manhattan, Riley 

Arthur Oris Park, Tyro, Montgomery 

Lorenzo Parker, Linn, Washington 

Richard Harry Parsons, Arkansas City, Cowley 

Gladys Isabell Patterson, Clifton, Washington 

Leroy Dudley Patton, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Gay Elbert Paxton, Emporia, Lyon 

Thomas Howard Payne, Hutchinson, Reno 

Nevels Pearson, Manhattan, Riley 

Ada Lueile Pellet, Eudora, Douglas 

Iva Ida Pemberton, Yates Center, Woodson 

Minnie Fern Peppiatt, Ellsworth, Ellsworth 

Essie Leah Peterson, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Oscar Francis Peterson, Manhattan, Riley 

Lillian Marie Peterson, . "Vesper, Lincoln 

Samuel David Petrie, Pratt, Pratt 

Fred Pollom, . .' Topeka, Shawnee 

Olive Clara Potter, New Albany, Wilson 

William Robert Pryor, <w Fredonia, Wilson- 

Joseph Lloyd Puckett, > Partridge, Reno 

Ray Marrion Purinton, Banner, Trego 

John Harold Rasford, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Zeno Clifford Rechel, Hutchinson, Reno 

James Everett Redburn, El Dorado, Butler 

Mary Ann Redden, Manhattan, Riley 

Marion Capps Reed, Havensville, Pottawatomie 

Ward Irving Reed, Havensville, Pottawatomie 

Raymond Gilfillan Reeve, Garden City, Finney 

Sarah Inez Reynolds, Kensington, Smith 

Ralph Joseph Richards, Manhattan, Riley 

Nellie Caldonia Richardson, Kansas City, Wyandotte 

Edward Stanton Riley, Dover, Shawnee 

Fulton Dick Ring, McPherson, McPherson 

Jacob Noah Ring, Caldwell, Sumner 

Malcolm Roach, Manhattan, Riley 

Floyd Clifford Roadhouse, Portis, Osborne 

Carl Otto Roda, Paradise, Russell 

William Herman Roda Paradise, Russell 

Harold Edwin Roe, Yinland, Douglas 

Joe Edward Roesler, Holyrood, Ellsworth 

Lloyd Leland Roll, Wichita, Sedgwick 

Nerva Yiola Ross, Coolidge, Hamilton 

Carl Rowland Rothrock, Baldwin, Douglas 

Orvid Yance Russell, New Albany, Wilson 

Theodore Fay Russell, Paola, Miami 

Everett Chester Rice Oxford, Sumner 

Alma Ruth Schafer, Manhattan, Riley 

Hugh Howard Scherer, St. John, Stafford 

Dan Scheufier, - Great Bend, Barton 

Elias Elizabeth Scheufier, Great Bend, Barton 

Merrill Philip Schlaegel, Yermilion, Marshall 

Anna Schlegel, Abilene, Dickinson 

Clara Schober, ...» Baker, Brown 

Frank Schwartz, Manhattan, Riley 

Chester McKinley Scott, Manhattan, Riley 

Ruby Pearl Scott, Manhattan, Riley 

Clarence Roy Sheets, Topeka, Shawnee 

Robert Shimmin, Manhattan, Riley 

David Loyd Signor, Manhattan, Riley 

Clarence Simcox, Canton, McPherson 

Clarence Harvey Simon, Haddam, Washington 

Nora Marguerite Simonson, . Manhattan, Riley 

Edna Skinner, Manhattan, Riley 

Francis Slattery, J ew ell, Jewell 

Allen Thurman Smith, L? Cygne, Lmn 

Henry Edwin Smith, Manhattan, Riley 

Mollie Manerva Smith, Westphalia, Anderson 

Paul Walter Smith, 2? bo , r . De * A 0sl ° w*V ^^ 

Ray Leonel Smith, Washington Washington 

Frances Colista Snyder, Lawrence. Douglas 

Ray Sook, Topeka, Shawnee 

George Sorick, Narka, Republic 

George William Sova, Harper, Harper 

Addie Mae Speck,. B eTlmg '^ 1C % ,r 

Ernest Boyd Stewart, Morganville, Clay 



List of Students 349 

SPECIAL, SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE— conimw^. 
Names p os t ^ ce (county or state) 

Velda Elizabeth Stewart, Morganville, Clay 

Esther Elizabeth Stonge, Riley. Riley 

Rose Elizabeth Straka, McPherson, McPherson 

John Godfrey Stutz, Utica, Ness 

Hartwell Wheeler Sullivan, Bazaar, Chase 

Francis Edgar Sweet, Manhattan, Riley 

Cleda Geneva Taylor, Manhattan, Rilev 

Earl Hicks Teagarden, Wayne, Republic 

Roy Otto Temple Lamed, Pawnee 

Orin Milton Thatcher, Manhattan, Riley 

Harold Tbeiss, Hutcbinson, Reno 

Anna Elizabeth Thomas, Kansas City, Missouri 

Kyle David Thompson, Densmore, Norton 

Frank Sylvester Toms Wichita, Sedgwick 

Harland Beal Towne, "Valencia, Shawnee 

Calvin Stover Tressler, Peabody, Marion 

Richard Culbent Tunstall, Manhattan, Riley 

Zelma Mabel Turner, Seneca, Nemaha 

Gail Maurice Umberger, Elmdale, Chase 

Alexander Unruh, Pawnee Rock, Barton 

Frank VanHaltern, Manhattan, Riley 

Archie Dennis VanPetten, Washington, Washington 

Loren Gilbert VanZile Manhattan, Riley 

Adelpha Ruth Vilander, Manhattan, Riley 

Joseph Kelly Walker, Ellsworth, Ellsworth 

Alice Webster, Manhattan, Riley 

Ethel Winona Wehrman, Nelson, Nebraska 

William Andrew Wehry, Peabody, Marion 

William Henry Weir, Topeka, Shawnee 

Peter Weissbeck, Collyer, Trego 

Thomas Welch, Emporia, Lyon 

Adelaide Wemmer, Princeton, Franklin 

George Louis Whitcomb, Cedar Point, Chase 

Mrs. Etoila Myrtle White Manhattan, Riley 

Julia May White, Manhattan, Riley 

William Moorhead White, Natoma, Osborne 

Wilma Whitmore, Manhattan, Riley 

Gilbert Whitsitt, Manhattan, Riley 

Arthur Wayne Wilhite, Rosedale, Wyandotte 

Clyda Dell Wilkinson, Manhattan, Riley 

Aline Letitia Williams, Sylvan Grove, Lincoln 

Bowman Minor Williams, ' . Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

Embre Lloyd Williams, Bigelow, Marshall 

Lee Scott Williams, Sylvan Grove, Lincoln 

Owen Williamson, Manhattan, Riley 

Homer Bryan Willis, ' . Manhattan, Riley 

Kay Wilson, Clifton, Washington 

Leon Brewer Wilson, Manhattan, Riley 

Perry Wilson, Englewood, Clark 

Alice Pearl Wismer, Pomona, Franklin 

Nettie May Wismer, Pomona, Franklin 

C. S. Wolgamott, Roswell, New Mexico 

Alice Jean Wood, Anthony, Harper 

Dorothy Agnes Woodman Manhattan, Riley 

Ralph Woods, Newton, Harvey 

Ava Hazelletine Woodworth, Tecumseh, Shawnee 

Helen Elizabeth Work, St. Joseph, Missouri 

Bertha Eme Wreath, Manhattan, Riley 

Nellie Flo Tantis, Garrison, Pottawatomie 

Samuel Floyd Yocum, St. John, Stafford 

Alvin Bernard Zerbe, Andover, Butler 

SPECIAL ST